3 Functions of Right Arm in Backswing

In this video, I'll show you the 3 functions of the right arm in creating the perfect backswing position. You'll find out: 1) How to properly use your core muscles for an efficient and under control backswing, 2) How to eliminate a shallow arc in the backswing by freeing up your right arm, and 3) Why the famous "towel under arm" drill can destroy your swing.

  • Elevation and flexion will give the club lift into your backswing 
  • You need elevation and flexion to create width in your backswing 
  • Stop losing width in your swing arc by keeping the arms tucked into the body

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Tyler
Hi Chris Tyler! Thanks for the review the other day and taking me off the ledge. So, I have a question regarding the transition from the takeaway to the backswing. I have been working hard on moving the club away with my core muscles and am improving my takeaway position. However, I know that the takeaway to backswing should look like one smooth movement, but what exactly should I feel when completing my backswing?? Do I simply elevate and use flexion from there while I keep turning? maybe a little right should rotation combined with left forearm rotation to set the club on plane and not go over the line? It just kind of feels all herky jerky transitioning from the end of the takeaway to the backswing. Many thanks man!
May 26, 2021
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello there sir! To finish off the backswing, feel the body continue to turn and then feel the hands elevate above the right shoulder. Do not allow the arms to feel like they are doing added movement away from the rotation of the body. This should help smooth it out and keep your the thoughts minimal for now. Always think big body turn, teeeeeny tiny hand and arm movements. Hope that helps
May 27, 2021
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Tyler
Got it! Thanks much for the reply. I have been doing a ton of body movement reps and am starting to feel good about it. I was tempted to hit some balls last night but I'm going to keep engraining the movement. I will send you in another swing review this weekend after I play a round. I appreciate your straight to the point comments, it is just what I need to get my @s!% in gear and get a better backswing. I'm totally confident that if I get this down, I can easily start compressing the ball better.
May 27, 2021
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Sounds like a plan!!! Stay focused and committed to the new movements and you will get there.
May 27, 2021
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Daniel
When watching clips of you, Chuck and some of his more successful students I notice you all have your right forearm straight up-and-down at the top (from this position if you were to stand upright the forearm would be angled behind you). When performing this drill my forearm starts straight up-and-down then angles downward when I hinge my waist. Basically my forearm angle matches my spine angle. A few questions about this. First, should I be trying to achieve a more vertical forearm at the top or should I stick with what's comfortable? Trying to fan my forearm to vertical at the top causes pain in my shoulder so maybe it's just a body-specific limitation. But I want to make sure I'm not missing something here. Happy holidays and no rush on the response. I'd rather you relax and spend the holidays with family
December 24, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Daniel. The elbow should point down. The amount will depend on how much external humeral rotation you have the ability to achieve. The trail arm matching perpendicular the the chest/shoulder line will be fine. Some players don't have enough to get it straight up and down with the ground. Enjoy the Holidays! Thanks for the well wishes.
December 24, 2020
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Lee
My right arm swings open more than it should. Exterior humorous rotation is almost zero for me. Is this something that could be increased with flexibility drills? Should I really care or work on this? How much arm swing, if any, is optimal? Tour players seem to swing arm slightly away but not really sure. Other than advising "just don't do it", what is the best drill(s) and check points to get the right amount of arm motion and position at the top. Appears that less than a full shoulder turn can give the illusion that its right and actually not. Thanks!
October 24, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Lee. You can increase it somewhat. But, not a ton with flexibility drills. There is minimal arm swing in the golf swing. You want full shoulder rotation, but remember elevation is variable. If you need to keep the hands a little lower and a touch more forearm rotation to counter balance the lack of external humeral rotation. This is fine. Take a look at 5 minutes to the perfect backswing checkpoints video.
October 25, 2020
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Kevin
Is it safe to say that if the right arm is getting too deep that we should focus more on elevation in the takeaway to counter that deep arm swing? Also, I've found I have some luck if I feel like I build my "arm unit" and just turn to the top but I also am feeling a lot more tension as I do this which I know can be a killer
April 23, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Kevin. You can check to see if you have enough elevation in TW, but that necessarily won't fix the issue.
April 23, 2020
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Bill
Wow. What a great drill it gets you to use more body and less arm swing to start your back swing. Also using the mirror you can see how your trail arm gets to the proper position at the top of the backswing from a set up position.
April 9, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Bill. Awesome. Thanks for the compliments to Chris.
April 9, 2020
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James
In this drill, when Chris first holds the club in his right hand when standing upright with the right arm flexed and mentions about the weight of the club causing the right wrist to bend back, does he maintain his thumb on the shaft? I can create an external rotation of the humerous, not quite as much as Chris though.
March 10, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. Genetics can limit external humeral rotation. The thumb will be on the club in real world scenario. The trail arm/hand will be providing some support.
March 11, 2020
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Bo
Hi Chris, in my last review you mentioned not letting my hands get too far in front on the downswing. I think I’m in a good position, but I wanted to double check. I’ve put in a lot of reps over the past week, and I want to make sure I’m not ingraining a bad habit.
February 24, 2020
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Bo
And top of backswing. This is feeling really good!
February 24, 2020
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Bo
This is with my left arm parallel to the ground.
February 24, 2020
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David
Hi Chris, thanks for the feedback, I'd heard you suggest I keep the right arm close as I turned on a prior swing feedback hence the feeling I have been practicing but understand what you say about width. Re the drill, are you suggesting I practice the drill as is shown in this video or something a little different?
February 12, 2020
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hi David, the drill in this video will work for sure. What I said in the previous reviews, were to keep the elbows and forearms (both right and left) close together as you work into the vertical plane. Hope that helps.
February 13, 2020
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David
Thanks Chris, you did say that but also that you wanted me to keep my right arm close as it was way too loose. Just wanted to check, was it the drill in this video that you wanted me to follow or were you trying to get me to do something slightly different?
February 13, 2020
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Sorry for the misunderstanding....This video and the drill will work to help solve the issue that you are faced with.
February 13, 2020
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Paul
Hi, after watching alot of videos, it seems the right side of our bodies should be the main focus when rebuilding the backswing. Is this correct ?
June 24, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Paul. Correct (for right handed player).
June 25, 2019
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James
Hi Craig, been working a lot on my backswing and trying to sort out the early wrist action as I begin the takeaway and not fully extending my right arm fully. I feel not getting the width in my backswing is contributing to my elbow flying out. I have been studying various golf models DL against my backswing and in all the cases I have looked at the main thing I see is that although my left arm stays straight, I think my right arm folds too early. After studying the captures below and other model comparisons, one thing I have spotted is that I feel my right wrist is overly flexing as I turn back. I feel this also attributes to my club being flatter in the backswing. When I concentrate on feeling that my right arm stays as straight as I can and stop over flexing the right wrist, I get into a better position at the top of my swing and the right forearm is on the same plane as my spine angle. As you can see in the DL capture, when my left arm is parallel with the ground, the shaft plane is pointing beyond the target line, whereas in the same position Chuck’s shaft plane is bang on the target line. It was the same when I compared to two other models, including your DL swing. As you know I do practice a lot in my study but the issue there is the ceiling is too low and I have gotten ingrained in flattening that right wrist to stop myself hitting it! So, I am going to have to stop doing a full swing in my study and work on those points above, plus any others you may wish to point me to.
June 15, 2019
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James
Here is a face on capture showing that when my left arm is parallel to the ground my right elbow is more folded (right elbow below left arm) than Chuck's is. His right arm is not really visible as it is parallel with his left arm. Plus he visibly has more width in his arms.
June 15, 2019
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Alan
Hi - so on the downswing should it be the exact opposite with the movement of the arms? Arms lower arms straight down as you squat to square and then right elbow straightens and rotates through impact?
June 8, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Alan. Somewhat it will be the exact same move. However, I don't want you actively trying to make those positions happen, or over work the trail arm. It will reach those spots as a byproduct of proper lead side usage in the downswing.
June 9, 2019
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Robert
what was the video mentioned at about 5:48 of this video?
March 16, 2019
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Dean
Pool Noodle Drill for Shoulder Elevation
March 17, 2019
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Cary
While working on this drill, once I reach the top of my back swing, I keep getting a lot of tension in my shoulders. I have tried to pull my shoulders up and relaxing them but the tension continues to creep back in. Any suggestions? Thanks in advance!
February 14, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Cary. You should have some muscle engagement. But, if you are overly tense. Sounds like the core is lacking a little. Take a look at Proper Muscle Activation Video.
February 14, 2019
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Cary
Chris, You are right on the money! After reviewing the video as well as getting in the box, I immediately lost the tension in my shoulders. What I now realize is that I had been rolling my shoulders forward and thus losing the connection to my core which has been causing me a multitude of problems, mainly getting stuck. Thank You!
February 15, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Cary. It's Craig. But, thats ok . Great. Love to hear less tension!
February 15, 2019
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charles
What are some drills for straightening the right arm at release? Having trouble with my post impact full release?
August 20, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Charles. The latter part of the 5 Minutes to the Perfect Release, Side Bend in the Golf Downswing, and Right Arm Release Video.
August 20, 2018
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charles
why do I keep getting messages to sign up for premium when I've been a member for two years??? Your answer to my question came as a message TO SIGN UP?
August 20, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Charles. That must be a glitch in the system for your account. I apologize for that. I don't have the technical details on my end. I would contact customer support. They should be able to fix the error for you.
August 20, 2018
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Yuefeng
What would be the issue if I can't do the third movement of the right arm very properly? Some degree of flying right elbow? And if I try really hard to to "tuck in" the right elbow I guess I can, but there is elevated strain in my elbow and tricep, is this even worse for the swing (and rather not to have it) given the tension?
August 13, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Yuefeng. Some players lack the ability for a lot of external humeral rotation. More of a genetic factor. Therefore, you have to be very aware of allowing proper lead arm shoulder socket rotation so you don't change the orientation of the club/plane. Trying to keep counter balancing of the trail arm out.
August 13, 2018
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Paul
I guess it is just and feels like to much of a strain to get my right arm at a 90 degree angle at the top of the back swing like I see on the videos I just don’t have the same body type as a tour pro or you guys so when I say I feel like my elbow is at mid chest likely it is at a 45 degree angle so do I need to get it to 90 and strain iris 45 good enough
July 18, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Paul. We all have the same bodies. Tour pros aren't built any more special than the rest of us. Some flexibility issues here and there, but the same muscle and bone groups. We all can have a great swing. Typically, when someone is feeling strain it's due to improper movement. The elevation factor is a variable in RST (Understanding Arm Elevation and How to Maintain Club Head Speed as You Get Older). Looking for base of the pectorals. The flexion is no more than 90 degrees. I haven't met a student yet that can't fold their elbow more than this. Have you had a previous injury, or surgery limiting your motion? The more I read your statement it sounds like you are referring to the elbow pointing straight down. Now, external humeral rotation is a genetic factor. If you can't get it all the way down straight you will require a little more rotation from the lead shoulder socket and forearms (How the Keep the Left Arm Straight and Stop Over Swinging Video - to check ext humeral rotation).
July 19, 2018
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Paul
for me when I feel like my right elbow is connected to my mid chest is when I have the most consistency in my swing it does limit my ability to get wide with my back swing is this a good feel to have
July 18, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Paul. Feeling is too subjective too teach. Can you define mid chest more? You don't want the arm glued to the side. The connection should be in the upper pectoral/upper bicep.
July 18, 2018
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Dave
Craig, you directed me just yesterday to this video to deal with my overswing and it seems really helpful. But, two things come to mind. It does seem like a lot of tour pros, Jack Nicklaus being a prime example, but also plenty of modern golfers, had a flying right elbow and it didn't seem to be a problem. Can you suggest why that worked for them? I have that issue, and can't seem to play as well as Nicklaus did, even though I also played since childhood with it....ha.... Second, in one of the comments here you mention that it is possible to overdo the humerus rotation and then end up with the club too much in front of you. How do you know whether that is happening? It turns out that I seem to have a lot of humerus rotation available, but don't want to go from a flying right elbow and overswinging to keeping it too much in front and not getting a long enough swing. Thanks for your help!
December 10, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dave. There are players that have a flying trail arm, but they require tons of practice and compensations in their swing to recover from it. Jack also had a massive Reverse C which he was able to make work. But, also why he has a new hip now. Our goal is efficiency and safety. Keeping the trail arm in front and in the box requires the golfer to make much less compensations and a safer position working into the strike. If you overdo rotation you will notice the trail elbow won't point down, but inverted to pointing at the ball. Also, the club will start to sit too much back in the trail wrist shutting the face.
December 11, 2017
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Dave
Thanks. Working with video of my swing today it is obvious I don't have the problem of overdoing rotation. But still overswinging some. There also used to be a video on the site that was called Biomechanically Shorten Your Swing, but the link no longer works. Is that because the idea behind it is not something you guys subscribe to any more?
December 11, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dave. Not many people can overdo it. Sadly, I am on of the few that can. Hence, shoulder surgery in the past. This video: Load Right Glute: Shorten Swing, Start Transition?
December 11, 2017
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arthur john
I always have a problem getting my arms high enough. When I do this drill all is good up and down how do I get this from normal address position. It's Ok when I am going from off the the ground as in the drill . How do I get to there from the address position. From the takeaway position? A john
September 13, 2017
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Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
Take a look at the Five Minutes to the Perfect Backswing video
September 18, 2017
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Frank
Wow, This video worked wonders for me. For the first time I am hitting center of club consistently and not topping ball or taking big divots. Thanks for the great explanation and demonstration. I finally got it.
August 25, 2017
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Frank
Is there any exercise to improve external humorous rotation to help with ideal position?
August 24, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Frank. There are a few baseball or pitching stretches on the web that may help, but genetics play a big factor in the amount of external humeral rotation you may add.
August 24, 2017
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Frank
Why does the towel under the armpit not encourage maintaining the connection with arm and pec?
August 24, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Frank. The towel under the arm pit reduces the ability to add proper shoulder elevation and glues the arm too much to the side.
August 24, 2017
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Eric
I had a horrible round yesterday and went to the range afterward. I have been battling a flying right elbow for years ingrained from youth. I'm in my 50's and grew up watching Jack and his flying elbow. Also a guy in my golf club is a scratch golfer with a flying elbow, Furyek like swing. However, I always feel like I play well - power and accuracy with a loaded right arm pointed to the ground. I have been trying to do it with perfect alignment, stance width, neutral shoulder alignment and grip. Sometimes it comes naturally, but when I press in a tournament or money on the line my right elbow takes over and I get deep and come over the top in a hard pull. So, i guess you really do need to train the numeral rotation and keep the bicep/pec connection, right? They are so many good things on this sight for stance, setup, takeaway, etc., but I think this does require some conscious thought to break the bad flying elbow? Just sharing my situation to save others time at the range and bad golf.
July 9, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Eric. It will take some conscious thought and training to over come the flying elbow. I would focus on the Right Arm Backswing Drill and Creating a Swing Plane Video to gather some real good awareness of the proper movements of the trial arm.
July 9, 2017
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Remington
Biomechanically Impossible to keep upper R arm close to bicep. How is this done?
March 30, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Remington. Take a look at the Stop Overswinging Video. You might be lacking external humeral rotation. Also, the connection is an awareness and not a massive pinch.
March 30, 2017
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Hank
After doing the elevation and flexion, I have trouble with my right elbow getting behind me and not keeping the connection between bicep and chest. It is the same motion as when I throw a ball and I cannot seem to stop doing it.
March 29, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Hank. Take a look at the Stop Overswinging Video. You might need to have more conscious thought or work on External Humeral Rotation.
March 29, 2017
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Hank
Thanks Craig, video very helpful. Now to see if I can use more conscious thought. Again it comes down to me not feeling that I am doing that move. I am due for another video review, so you can see if there has been any progress.
March 30, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Hank. Good. Yes, that is the major problem with golf. Feel and real are two different things.
March 30, 2017
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James
You mention something about another video with the word Checkpoint but I cannot understand the rest of the name. Please help me locate it. Thanks
February 18, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. I believe the video you are referring to is no longer on the site. I apologize. If you give me a time stamp when Chris mentions it. I will let you know for sure.
February 19, 2017
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Damien
Hello, I really struggle with consistency with ball flight. If I close my face the ball goes well left, if the face is open it goes right. I have tried everything to come from the inside, I have really good lower body stability and can start with the lower body, but results don't change. I have started to notice that at the top of the backswing my right elbow points behind me. Could this position stop me getting my arms back in front of my from a proper inside swing path, and be the cause of my inconsistent shots and probable OTT issue. Cheers Damien
December 5, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Damien. If the trail arm starts to point too far behind you at the top of the swing. 1. You are more likely to get stuck coming into the ball. 2. Also, over using the trail side to get the arms back in front leading to over the top. Poor trail arm positioning at the top can easily lead to inconsistent shots.
December 5, 2016
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Robert
I'm able to get more than 45 degrees of external rotation in my right arm considering I used to be a swimmer / diver. How much external rotation of the right arm is too much?
November 4, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Rob. When the hands start crossing centerline too much and getting to the side of the body. And/or the weight starts pushing the trail elbow down too much due to the heaviness of the club.
November 4, 2016
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Jason
The video talks of right arm flexion to be no more than 80 or 90°. I personally struggle with over flexion. It makes me get deeper I think and then I have a tendency to heave myself from the top to get the arms back in front (or so I think).---> what would be the reason you'd say why we should only flex the right arm by about 80 to 90°?
October 25, 2016
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Jason, the total amount of flexion is a variable and can be differently measured from one golfer to the next. Flexion helps move the hands and arms into the vertical plane and we are looking for you to keep the lead are straight when achieving your flexion. Note: we don't want the lead arm ramrod stiff straight, just passively straight. If you are struggling with over flexion, then you might want to start working to the top of your swing and get into the desired position and hold it static, then shift and swing through. Other than that, we can help you in the swing reviews with this issue. Hope that helps.
October 26, 2016
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Claus
While the drill works pretty fine, once I hit a ball, my takeaway is still left hand dominated. What thought can help to "calm down" my left push? Would it help to grip with more pressure/awareness in the right hand?
October 18, 2016
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Claus, if you see your takeaway breaking down like this, I would focus more on keeping the grip pressure light in both hands and put more focus on shifting your weight and turning your body to start the swing. Weight shift and body turn will move the club into a good takeaway position and keep the focus off the hands and arms. When you focus more on the arms early on, the tendency is to overuse them and thus, lead the problems you are facing. Hope that helps and good luck.
October 19, 2016
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T David
Should we try to achieve a flat left wrist at the top?
October 12, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dave. The lead wrist should be flat at the top. Take a look at Using the Wrist Effectively and Efficiently.
October 13, 2016
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T David
Thanks, Craig. That video really helped clear things up a lot! Also, just wanted to tell you how much I appreciate the great insights on my video swing reviews. They are spot on with your suggestions and really prompt getting the responses back. I truly appreciate it! You are totally awesome in your diagnosis of my swing issues. I can see my improvement with each review. Thanks much!
October 13, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dave. Thanks for the compliments. However, you do all the work. I just help nudge you in the right direction.
October 13, 2016
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Corby
Video says maintain connection between top of bicep and top of chest. This is a huge change from my old (incorrect) swing. One in which I pulled the right arm/elbow well behind my chest. My question is this: Can I get some more detail on this crucial move - maintaining the connection between the top of the bicep and top of chest? Want to make sure I am doing it correctly. Right now this requires me to consciously apply pressure from my right bicep to my chest - very strange feeling which fatigues my right bicep.
October 11, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Corby. You don't want to overly press the upper pectoral and bicep together. It is more of an awareness that they are staying close. Don't clinch, but keep the sensation that both aren't separating. You can see the same thing in the 5 Minutes to the Perfect Backswing Pitfalls.
October 12, 2016
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Derrick
When working on this drill, I feel tension in my right rear deltoid (near my tricep). I know I'm not supposed to have tension there, but I can't figure out how to get rid of it. I think it's caused by trying to get some external humerus rotation. Are there any drills or advice on how to prevent tension in the right shoulder at the top of the backswing?
September 27, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Derrick. Take a look at the Winter Golf Training Program Backswing Video. It helps with players that over engage the trail side to the top. You will be able to monitor your tension by adding the arm at the end of the drill.
September 27, 2016
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Yuefeng
I wonder for the correct right hand position at the top, does it have to be just above the right shoulder? Is it ok for the hands to be somewhat behind the shoulders (from DTL view)? I also notice from the pro videos, the longer the clubs, the further back the hands seem to be behind the shoulders. Thanks.
September 22, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Yuefeng. Ideal positioning will be directly over the trail shoulder. However, the longer the club gets with most pros you will see it get a touch deeper.
September 22, 2016
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James
I didn't see in this video "Why the famous "towel under arm" drill can destroy your swing." I think that the reason is that the right arm won't have a proper, efficient width. Correct?
September 10, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. That was under the previous version of this video. This is an updated video. I apologize. The towel under the arms restricts elevation and glues the arms to the chest. Making a more rounded motion versus allowing for vertical motion with the arms. Moving the arms and club too much into the depth dimension. (4 Square Drill).
September 10, 2016
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Pat
Best golf video I've ever seen-- made huge impact on my game
July 25, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Pat. Awesome. Thanks for the post!
July 26, 2016
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Joshua
Hello at what point in the swing do you begin shoulder elevation? Is it after the 2 inch shoulder blade move in the takeaway? Also does the right elbow flexion occur simultaneously with the elevation?
July 16, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Joshua. There is a little shoulder elevation in the takeaway (4 Square Drill). The vast majority will begin after the takeaway is completed (45 degrees of rotation - 2 inch movement). As you begin to elevate after the takeaway the trail arm flexion will begin.
July 16, 2016
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Joshua
Ok thanks so after you get the club in the correct spot in the takeaway like in the 4 square drill, it's mostly elevation and elbow flexion not too much more rotation at that point?
July 17, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Joshua. There will be 45 degrees more of shoulder rotation to give you a total of 90 degrees at the top. While rotating the arms will elevate combined with flexion and external humerus rotation.
July 17, 2016
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Brent
I have been working on this drill and I am wondering if it is possible to keep your right arm TOO MUCH in front of your body? In other words can you over do keeping right arm in front?
July 11, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Brent. You can add too much external humeral rotation depending on flexibility. Some albeit very little. Can achieve a position a little too in-front.
July 12, 2016
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Jason
If I combine right arm flexion with some remaining arm elevation, I feel like I lose control of the club, or feel it is "floating" out there with no control.----> alternatively, I have tried to think of it in this way as the backswing sequence (while rotating of course); elevation first, then 90 degree wrist set second, followed right arm flexion third.----> this way I can avoid flexion and elevation together. any thoughts on this sequence being "ok"
June 30, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jason. It sounds like you are getting the hands involved too early. The wrist set should be very gradual and a product of adding the elevation and flexion correctly.
June 30, 2016
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Michael
Chris, Would I benefit from the Rotary Connect swing training aid? I ask because the shipping to UK makes it expensive.
June 15, 2016
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Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
Yes the shipping is a pain, very expensive for us to get them over to you but if you struggle with the proper feeling of the arms this helps correct it immediately.
June 16, 2016
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Michael
Chris, Spent sometime this morning on 5 minute backswing drill. This evening spent an hour on the above drill interspersed with some chipping in the garden. My question is: do you need to keep your eye on the ball when you are at the top of the back swing? Or do you adjust as you are coming through on the down swing and the ball comes back into the eyeline?
June 14, 2016
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Micheal, depends on the mobility that you have in your neck, you will see some players head rotate a bit as the shoulders complete more of a full turn. Ideally, you want to keep you eye focused on the back of the ball. I use the left eye on the back of the ball all of the time. If you are losing sight of the ball, then you might be creating a bit too much movement of the head. Hope that helps.
June 14, 2016
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Michael
OK. Thanks.
June 14, 2016
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
My pleasure!
June 14, 2016
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James
I feel like the momentum of the club moves my right bicep away from my chest, any tips?
June 14, 2016
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey James, If you are sure that the club is causing the disconnect and not coming more from a lead side push of the club into the backswing, you may want to try the get perfect tempo video and see if that helps give you a focus point going back. https://rotaryswing.com/videos/full-swing-advanced/backswing/get-perfect-golf-swing-tempo
June 14, 2016
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Loran
What happens to a ball flight when the elbow gets too deep? I try to do a good turn, with my left shoulder tucked under my chin, to the right, but I still fear the elbow gets out of range?
May 14, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Loan. The deeper the trail arm gets the more it will affect the ability to apply club head speed with core rotational power and getting the arms to work with ease back in front of the body.
May 14, 2016
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Charles
for clarity sake, elevation and flexion take place at the three o'clock position? Many of the videos show a sequence that is elevation, flexion, rotation. The rotation taking place with the club elevated and the right arm at 90% then the rotation. This may be for teaching purposes and not the 'live' full swing sequence???
May 11, 2016
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Charles, the sequence of building a perfect backswing always needs to be rotation, elevation (at a gradual rate through the takeaway and into the backswing, and elevation. Always best to train the arm movements once you have weight shift and rotation down perfect. Hope that helps.
May 11, 2016
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Charles
In the full golf swing where is the club when the positioning of the right arm takes place?? Does this start from the left arm side, or centered o the spine or Moe Norman esh from the right arm side?? advise
May 10, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Charles. The trail arm will begin the majority of the elevation and adding flexion just after the takeaway. The arms will be out in front of the sternum and if I am gathering the question correctly more center of the spine.
May 10, 2016
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Stephen
Hi Craig, When practicing I do the elevation and flexion, however I have an open club face? Does the external humeral rotation help to get the club face matching the lead arm? Thanks. Stephen
April 12, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Stephen. Yes, a little bit of the external and making sure that you have just a little hinge in the trail wrist.
April 12, 2016
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Stephen
I do the above and I still have an open club face
April 12, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Stephen. Do you still experience the same issue with lead arm only. For Ex. Winter Series Backswing?
April 12, 2016
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Stephen
I wil have a try n get back to u . Thanks. Stephen
April 18, 2016
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Tom
Would you recommend using the "Right angle" training device to enhance learning the correct right arm bend?
February 28, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Thomas. You may use the device. The only issue you might find would be struggling with feeling the proper muscles versus just relying on the device to correct the motion. Training aids are only as good as you allow them to be.
February 29, 2016
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Tom
Thank you. The question is now moot as my right arm collapse is so ingrained that I actually snapped my right angle device practicing at the range yesterday. Believe it or not this was the 2nd time I've done this. I won't be buying a 3rd but will focus on the videos and other techniques Thank you for answering and for the help. The videos are excellent.
February 29, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Thanks for the compliments on our videos. If we can help any further, please ask away. Take a look at the Over Swinging Video. It will be hard to allow for too much flexion if you maintain external humeral rotation.
February 29, 2016
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Joel
My rotary swing instructor told me that I have a big problem with a deep right arm and extreme right arm angle, causing me to overswing. I then have to work hard to get everything aligned back to the ball. I'm naturally quite flexible so are there any drills that I can use to help fix this? I'm particularly interested in drills I can do indoors. Thanks.
February 16, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Joel. This drill will be one of the best to tackle poor right arm positioning. You can also supplement this video with the 5 Mins to the Perfect Backswing - Checkpoints - Pitfalls.
February 16, 2016
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Loran
Then, ideally the arm elevation should not be too high. Modified and shorten according to body height?
February 7, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Loan. Yes, you can over do the elevation. No more necessary than inline with the base of the pectoral.
February 7, 2016
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Dave
Hi Chris. Great check going to the top, down to the impact and then back up. Helps that feeling of how the right elbow and arm should feel on takeaway. I notice you didn't discuss why the todwel drill can ruin your swing and I am interested in your thoughts. I used to use it and developed great connection with it. However it pretty much ruined my width and subsequent lag as it flattened out my takeaway by reducing my elevation as I became obsessed by holding the towel under my arms that I never gained any height. Only after a friend pointed out to me my right hand was across my shoulder instead of above that I realised how much width I had lost. Is this what you were referring to in the comments about the towel drill?
February 4, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dave. Yes, the towel drill can get you too connected and cause the arms to want to move too horizontal in the swing versus vertical. Affecting the arm depth in the swing and especially speed.
February 4, 2016
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
RST Members, I hope you enjoy the remastered version of this video, with a different spin on how to train the trail arm in your golf swing. Keep working hard on your changes and big things to come in 2016.
February 3, 2016
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Yuefeng
Hi Craig, I want to clarify a bit on the right arm external rotation - is it upper arm rotation that makes the forearm further away from the body (without much change of the palm facing direction) or forearm rotation that will make the palm face more towards the face? Thank you.
February 2, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Yuefeng. The external humeral rotation will keep the arm from flying away from the body. The little bit of forearm rotation will help you with the club to not point across the line.
February 3, 2016
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Marc
Hi Craig, I think I am onto something which is going to change my swing dramatically as I have always struggled with my backswing. What I see is that when Chris does the flexion of his right arm without a club he is able to look into the palm of his hand and not just his thumb. When I take a club and do the same I find I can complete the backswing with the external rotation and keep everything nicely in front of me without any risk of over swinging and loosing control of my right elbow. Is my interpretation of what Chris does correct or would the flexion bring the hand up with the thumb in front in which case I still need to find how to limit my backswing. Thanks a lot by the way for your great swing reviews Best, Marc
December 1, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Marc. Thanks for the compliment. Yes, that little bit of forearm rotation you are seeing from Chris will help with the trail arm going back. You are seeing it clearly in the video.
December 1, 2015
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Marc
Perfect it all makes sense
December 1, 2015
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Yuefeng
Hello, I think what I get really confused is that if I simply grab my left thumb with my right hand, and then lift and bend the right arm 90 degree in front of my body (with forearm external rotation too), I simply cannot keep my left arm straight. In other words I have to bend my left arm too for this to happen. In my swing review, Craig commented that my right arm was pushed outside the body to the right, and I guess that's what I subconsciously did in order to keep my left arm straight. Really appreciate the clarification.
November 30, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Yuefeng. It sounds like you are using the trail arm flexion to make up for lack of wrist set. If you are using the trail arm properly and adding flexion to guide the lead arm into position. But, reach a point where the lead arm has to bend. You more than likely aren't allowing for the wrist to set.
December 1, 2015
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Yuefeng
Thanks Craig. Just to be sure, when you said lack of wrist set, are you referring to left wrist cocking or right wrist hinging? Thanks.
December 1, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Yuefeng. The left wrist will set and the right wrist will have a touch of hinge. You can see this well in the Using the Wrist Effectively and Efficiently Video and the Checkpoints Video. In your case it is more likely the left wrist.
December 1, 2015
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Corey
I think I'm starting my arm flexion too early. Should the elevation begin before any flexion occurs or is the process blended?
November 24, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Corey. Elevation will start slightly before, but will feel and look like a blended move after continued reps. Elevation, flexion, then external humeral rotation.
November 24, 2015
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Jason
how much of the external upper arm rotation during arm flexion is an active process vs a "preset" process at address where the golfer sets up making sure the right elbow pit faces away?
November 5, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jason. You don't want to preset all of the external humeral rotation at setup. The trail arm would become too rigid and locked. Elbow pit facing away comfortably. Then, add just a little once you start reaching the top.
November 5, 2015
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Jim
Great, succinct video by the way!
July 12, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jim. I will pass the good word to Chris. Thanks.
July 14, 2015
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Jim
I think the answer to my question immediately below is "somewhere in between", that is, in a neutral position with right palm facing skyward. Correct?
July 12, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jim. Correct.
July 14, 2015
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Jim
At the top of the backswing should the right forearm be fully pronated, fully supinated or somewhere in between? Because it is possible to rotate the forearm while externally rotating the upper arm/shoulder.
July 12, 2015
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Jim, The forearms and wrists rotate together due to the distal radialulnar joint. We are looking for gradual rotation of the wrists during the entire swing. Take a look at the "using the wrists effectively and efficiently" video for further clarification. You do not need to be at full ROM of supination in the right wrist/forearm at the top of the swing.
July 12, 2015
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Alessandro
I' m trying at home to reach the position as you suggested: first elevation, second flextion and third extra rotation and I can say that for me is very difficult to do extra rotation with right arm. Is it normal ?
June 26, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Alessandro. It shouldn't be to difficult, but some people lack the flexibility. Clay discusses this in the Fix the Flying Elbow Video in this Section.
June 26, 2015
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Loran
The right arm that forms the "magic triangle" at the top of the swing means the right arm must stay in front of the chest? Any more than that is considered "deep," correct? A little away, some leeway is allowed, no? This right arm location depends on body type or is this rule rigid?
June 26, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Loan. Yes, the trail arm will stay in front of the body. If it start to come away from the chest it is considered flying and deep. You don' want to glue it to your side. Just awareness that it hasn't come completely away. Trail arm positioning is the same for all body types.
June 26, 2015
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Dean
I have two clarifications that are creating some confusion for me all related to the right arm in the downswing. 1) I've been reading on the site lately the distinction between Rotary Swinger and Rotary Hitter. The Hitter (Rotary Swing Chuck has refined and is teaching now) uses the arms (right arm too) through impact vs the focus on body rotation of the Swinger. This Swinger vs. Hitter distinction is confusing. 2) The article on the "Throw the Ball Drill" reinforces the importance of the right arm (trail arm) in gaining club head speed at and through impact. This seems to counter the pull with the left obliques and left arm through impact that the 5min to the perfect Backswing teaches.
June 11, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dean. The Hitter is using more of the 3 power sources efficiently (Leverage, Width, Rotation). The Swinger is using primarily rotation as a power source. Much more beneficial to use all 3. Less wear and tear on the body and more efficient. The trail arm does add speed in the golf swing. However, most players way over use it and a few under use it. The Throw the Ball Drill is to show players that under use it and typically have too much lag how to release the energy. And, players that over use it that they are losing speed by exerting too much trail arm force too soon.
June 11, 2015
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Dean
Thanks Craig, this helps clarify. I have strong lag and had trouble pushing everything right with the driver. Could be a symptom of not enuf right arm.
June 11, 2015
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Jason
I've been doing right arm drills for a couple of weeks now and seems to be going good. When I start to hit balls again ( full swing ) would you advise to think of right arm flexion or let flexion happen through shoulder/ arm elevation?
May 7, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jason. Elevation won't force the right arm to add flexion. However, I've never seen anyone be able to keep the trail arm completely straight to the top. Think elevate and allow for a little flexion.
May 8, 2015
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Nguyen
Guy I see there are forearm rotation (supination). And it's the forearms rotation happen in the take away. Here we list only 3 funtion: elevation, flexion, external rotation. Do you mean the right forearm supination is the consequence of left forearm pronation in the takeaway and does not count as a right arm function here?
April 15, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Nguyen. There is right forearm rotation in the takeaway. Not a ton, but there is a little. Discussed in the Bucket Drill and the Unleash Your Thumbnail for Power Video in the Takeaway and Advanced Takeaway Section. This video focuses mainly on the right arm from the takeaway to the top. The left arm will rotate from the takeaway to the top as a function of folding the right arm correctly.
April 15, 2015
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Nguyen
Thank Craig. So the right forearm rotation only happen in the takeaway.
April 15, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Yes. You don't need to focusing on making a big forearm rotation with the right arm from the takeaway to the top.
April 15, 2015
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love this video as it totally helped me understand how to stop my flying right elbow. One problem that has developed for me is that while my contact and compression has increased , I now hit fades and slices (always before hit draws and hooks) . Is this something that is natural until I get used to what feels like a big change in my golf swing?
January 29, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Sometimes when players start to correct the trail arm fly. Being in front of the body is new and foreign. Therefore, they tend to push a little too much with the trail shoulder and get steep on the ball. Keep working on the trail arm and flying elbow position. Take a look at the LADD Video in the Downswing Section to start shallowing out the plane better into the strike. Remove some of the trail side push.
January 30, 2015
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Jeff
I am working on getting my right arm underneath my shoulder during the backswing. I can't keep it from flying out without forcing it into place. Should I try to force it in place or simply "engage" the right lat until it gradually over time moves to the right position?
January 13, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jeff. Nothing in the RST swing should be overly forced. You may have a lack of flexibility/external humeral rotation. Take a look at the Fix the Flying Elbow Video in the Advanced Backswing Section. Get as close to it as possible.
January 13, 2015
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Iain
External Rotation - I don't seem to be able to do this without moving my elbow. Is there an exercise I can do to help this?
November 20, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Lain, Just keep moving the joint in the direction often. The best way to improve mobility and flexibility is to move. Don't force it further than it wants to go because that will actually cause the brain to slam the brakes on more because it says "ah ah ah, I don't feel comfortable doing that". So, just get used to moving the arm in that direction and eventually the joint will be more mobile. This works with all joints. Dynamic stretching during that day and Static stretching before you go to sleep and when you wake up will help your flexibility and mobility greatly. Good luck! R.J.
November 20, 2014
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Dan
Thx RJ for the quick response and completeness of your explanation. You've been very helpful. I appreciate it.
November 11, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Dan, You're welcome. R.J.
November 12, 2014
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Dan
A clarifying question. If I execute the 3 moves of the right arm properly in the backswing and make a full rotation where should my hands be at the top? For me (from face on) they end up at ear height and considerably to the left of my head. Is that correct? For a lot of tour players the hands seem to get at least behind the head. Thx
November 11, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Dan, Yes, the way that you're doing it is proper. Pros tend to get a little deep in their backswing in order to try to generate more power, mostly because they're using a one plane swing approach, but they have to make a significant move in order to get their arms back in front of their bodies in the downswing. However, if you look at Jason Dufner at the top of the swing, you'll be able to see that he is in a similar position that you described and he still gets more than enough club head speed. Although Dufner's swing is pretty goofy looking from the setup and at the finish, his backswing and downswing are closer to the RST fundamentals than many of the pros on tour, he just needs to make some compensations in order to get to those positions, whereas, we're teaching you to not have to worry about making compensations to get to the proper positions. Tiger is another great example of a pro who keeps his arms in front of him, he's a little more flexible than most of us though so he can get more shoulder turn than most of us. R.J.
November 11, 2014
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Mike
This is very helpful in my fight to fix my flying right elbow, and I can now mimic these moves in front of a mirror. However, how should this feel brom the completion of the takeaway, assuming I now have that reasonably correct. I'm sort of able to feel a move where the right arm simultaneously lifts, folds and externally rotates, but most of the videos seem to talk about them sequentially. Any help would be great. Thanks.
November 5, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Mike. They do feel like they happen all at once. As you elevate, the arm will add a little flexion, and following with a little external humeral rotation. It's a blended move. Take a Look at the Move 2 Video in the Backswing Section. Learn how to continue to pull with the shoulder blade and add the correct arm motion.
November 5, 2014
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Lawrence
Craig: Is there anyone who is certified to teach/instruct RST in the San Diego area?
October 20, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Larry, Check the world wide instructor listings in the in-person lessons section of the header. The instructors are organized by state. R.J.
October 20, 2014
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George
Would a good feeling to have during the backswing be for both forearms to stay as close as possible to each other?
October 7, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Patterson. You can be aware of them staying close like wearing a Rotary Connect. But, don't overly force it. If you stress external rotation with both arms throughout the swing, it will engage other muscles not needed. Keep awareness and the trail elbow pit facing away.
October 7, 2014
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David
Great video. What is the ideal amount of elevation for the right arm? At the 3:40 mark, filming from down the line you describe the shoulder as elevated to "the bottom of the pec." But if you stood straight up at this point (instead of being in your address position), how elevated would the shoulder be? Would the humerus be parallel to the ground? (And thus the forearm perpendicular to the ground?) I'm just trying to get a good landmark for how much shoulder elevation to shoot for.
September 29, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello David. Shoulder elevation will be variable depending on genetics and body size. The elevation will be to the bottom of the pectoral. It would be hard for me to say if your humerus parallel to the ground is your exact amount.
September 29, 2014
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David
Thanks Craig. Looking again at the 3:40 mark, your spine and your humerus form a 90 degree angle, and your elbow is also flexed to 90 degrees, making your spine and your forearm about parallel to each other. If you were to extend the hips and stand straight up, it appears that your humerus would be parallel to the ground and your forearm would be perpendicular. I'm wrestling with how much elevation to shoot for (right now I have none unfortunately), and the cue "bottom of the pec" is just too vague to me (what exactly gets to the bottom of the pec? the meat of the upper arm / triceps? the humeral bone?) I guess my question is, if I am flexible enough to get the shoulder raised to the point where the humerus is at 90 degrees to the spine (and thus would be parallel if I were to stand straight up), should I do that? Or should I stop a couple inches lower, at the "pec" landmark? Thanks again
September 29, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello David. That's Chris in the video. However, I can see the confusion. Everyone here has a name that starts with a "C". Kinda of a prerequisite. I see where you are going with that. If you don't have enough elevation and the 3:40 mark is a good checkpoint for you with relation to degrees. You can use that. Just know if you start getting too much, the arms will start to swing pass your rotation. If your arms start getting long/deep, then you know to back down on the elevation and/or flexion.
September 29, 2014
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michael
Hi Craig, with regard to elevating the right arm, having watched a number of my videos it appears that mt right elbow runs parallel with my hip line and then goes behind me no matter what I try. Are there any tips to help me over this in order to achieve the 3 functions correctly. Thanks Michael
September 12, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Michael. Have you tried the 4 Square Drill in the Advanced Backswing Section. It should be some good visuals for keeping the arms more in front.
September 12, 2014
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David
In the video, it appears that as right arm is flexing, there is some rotation occurring such that the "hitchhiker" thumb would not point directly over the right shoulder, but rather 45* to that point. Chuck does this too except when he states to eliminate upper arm rotation to simplify more. But this rotation is needed to set club on plane, else swing too vertical. However I feel this rotation more in my forearm. Right?
September 10, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello David. I think you are referring to External Humeral Rotation. That will be done more by rotating the right scapula clockwise (right handed). Take a look at the Over Swinging Video in the Advanced Backswing Section for more detail.
September 10, 2014
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leobaguilar13953
I very seldom can view your videos because of the stop and go or don't go at all quality of playing them
September 8, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
It sounds like it is a browser issue. Are you using Chrome or Firefox? Please feel free to Contact Customer Support with the Contact Us Link at the bottom of this page. They should be able to help you.
September 9, 2014
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julian
I would like to see the right arm finish picture in a still, the video does not make this very clear.
August 14, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Julian. Use the Right Arm Only Video in the Advanced Backswing Section for more clarification. Feel free to use the self analysis tool to slow Chuck or any of our models to spot check the correct position.
August 14, 2014
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John
Would this be a good drill to use with the impact bag to feel how much power I could get with minimum amount of effort?? Great video!! Thanks
July 30, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey John. It depends. What would you be doing with the impact bag? Swinging it to the top, or using the right arm only into the bag?
July 30, 2014
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Seth
I am a little confused of this movement. I can do this move two different ways. (1) as elbow flexion happens there is no rotation of my forearm and my two forearm bones are one in front of the other facing towards me and outwards. I can then externally rotate post elbow flexion. (2) as flexion happens my wrist bones rotate in and are next to each other facing towards me and outwards. I can externally rotate post elbow flexion. Which one is correct and each give me two different feelings at the top of my backswing?
July 22, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
More like number 2. As you add the flexion there will be a little forearm rotation into the external humeral rotation. A blended move. Not two piece. Take a look at the Move 2 Video in the Backswing Section. You can see it when Chuck does it as well.
July 22, 2014
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Joseph
Hey guy I was looking at the drill and was wondering if this will help me get less wrist hinge because I do that and causes me to get a little over plane. Another thing is how is your right hand suppose to feel at the top I know some people say your suppose to feel like your holding a Tray in your hand to get the proper feeling. Maybe you can help me understand how the right hand is suppose to feel. Thanks
July 21, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Yes, this will help with some of the wrist hinge issue. Typically too much flexion and too much wrist hinge go together. The right hand has a little bit of hinge and set. Holding a tray would be too much. Flat would be too little. Right in between. Roughly looking like a 45 degree angle to the forearm and feeling like flipping a coin over the shoulder.
July 21, 2014
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Ryan
Hey Chris great stuff from all you gys as usual but when i hear that we don't want to bury our arms but also that our biceps or top of biceps that you discuss here should be touching our chest!!!! Could use just explain the feeling or a solid checkpoint for this??? I mean as a low single digit I'm always trying to feel little things that help with my consistency and in search of a fundamentally near perfect positons throughout my entire golf swing. I don't know why I struggle with this concept other then the fact that I must not be understanding properly how the top of my left bicep as a left handed player touches my chest/pec/body!!! Thanks as always fellas and keep up the great stuff!!!!!
May 7, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Best way to describe this feeling and we do not recommend drilling in this nature, is if you had a tee in the very top of the arm pit and you were trying to hold it in place. That would keep the very top of the bicep touching the very top of the chest. Hope that helps.
May 7, 2014
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Ryan
Thanks Chris okay so it seems for me that when i look on camera I'm pretty much in good position and nothing i really need to think about and just let it happen naturally!!!! Thanks....
May 8, 2014
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david
Can you comment on where the upper left arm/shoulder should be in relation to the chin at the top of the backswing. I find that with practice swings things feel fine but when I am taking a shot and trying to keep my eye on the ball my shoulder jams under my chin so I try to chin up but it would really like to know where the left shoulder/arm should touch the chin or face, if at all when actually taking a shot.
May 6, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey David, I posted an reply back to you on this in the backswing video that you commented on. Check it out and see if that helps at all.
May 7, 2014
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Craig
Chris, I'm having a hard time with my left arm collapsing across my chest in the back swing I've been working on my backswing drills in the mirror and they look good. But when I hit balls on video, left arm gets all involved again Suggestions? Thanks
April 30, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
When you say collapsing, are you referring to the left arm pushing across your center rather than being pulled across your center? Have you checked your elevation points out. Take a look at the pool noodle shoulder elevation video that we just put out and see if that helps. Make sure the the arms are passive and focus on big body turn (rotation) and small arm movements (elevation and flexion).
April 30, 2014
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Craig
Yes left arm pushes across my body, rather than keeping hands in-front of my chest they end up behind me
April 30, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
You need to do your best to train the arms to be as passive as possible from the get go. Only a bit of elevation from both arms in the takeaway coupled with the most important part of rotation. Then into the backswing, the right arm flexion pulls the left arm across the center with the final bit of elevation all while rotation still being the most important part of the move. I would start right in with the takeaway and work through getting the arms to remain passive and keeping the hands in the center of the chest, with both arms straight, 45 degrees of shoulder turn and the club head in line with the hands. Start at the takeaway make sure there is no pushing from the lead arm, then work into the backswing.
May 1, 2014
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Craig
Thanks Chris
May 2, 2014
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greg
Chris: Is there a video of the sequence that occurs after the right shoulder glide to complete the backswing? When & how do the hips turn, etc. Thanks!
April 23, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Continued rotation of the torso as outlined in 5 minutes to master rotation will help finish the turn in the shoulder line and also pull the hips to a wound position as you work into the backswing after a completed takeaway.
April 24, 2014
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greg
Chris: I understand the teaching of the right shoulder glide, etc. to start the backswing, but turning the right hip out of the way works better for me, the arms, wrists, & shoulders remaining passive. Can you give me some videos and advice on using this swing thought? Thanks!
April 16, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
The hips really need to be controlled by the rotation of the torso in the backswing. They need to have little to no turn in the takeaway and then pulled to a wound position in the backswing. Starting with the hips will not give you the full awareness of the big muscles in the core that are critical for building power.
April 21, 2014
64x64
vernon
I am having difficulty achieving the last few degrees of rotation and of shoulder elevation so at the completion of my backswing my hands are lower than the top of my head and the right elbow is lower than my pecs. I believe 50 years ago this would not have been an issue for me. I have been working hard on flexibility exercises. Any suggestions?
April 8, 2014
64x64
René (Certified RST Instructor)
Hi Vernon. Be sure that you have your shoulders retracted and depressed (in the box) and that you keep them that way if you are bending from the hips. See the Setup section for this. If your shoulders are rolling forward it will limits your rotation of your torso and elevation of the arms.
April 8, 2014

If you've been struggling with maybe getting your golf club on that perfect looking swing plane at the top of your swing, or maybe you've even been battling with that flying right elbow, well, I've got great news for you. Because we're gonna be discussing the three key functions of your right arm from your take away position into the top of your backswing.

                This is going to allow you to get the golf club on plane every single time. It's also gonna help you correct that deep right elbow position.

                Okay guys, so I'm pretty sure you've heard us talk over and over about the three key components that can prize club head speed. We talk a lot about width, leverage and rotation. And obviously we know that leverage is going to be our biggest source for fishing club head speed. And I'm not gonna argue that at all. I think that's a great way to get the golf club really moving without having to do a whole lot of work.

                But what I want you to think about here to day is that we still need to have a good balance of rotation width available to us in our swing for a couple different reasons here. Is that, if we built our golf swing primarily around leverage.

                Okay. So, if I had my golf swing where I wasn't really rotating my body at all. My arms were really close to my body. Yeah. And I released this angle, I could get that club head really really moving through the hitting area. But I'd have to work pretty hard, number one, with my hands and my arms. And number two, I'd be relying more on timing in my golf swing. And timing is one of those things that can make your shots fluctuate from one to the next. It can actually make your rounds really fluctuate and that's really one of the things that a lot of our golfers struggle with is being consistent.

                So, in order to balance the golf swing out properly, we still have to have those other two ingredients. And that's where we are going to be focusing today. Is we are going to be focusing on training proper within your golf swing so you can have a well balanced equation. And than you can also stop feeling like you having to work so hard with your hands and arms.

                So I want you to think about your right arm and your golf swing as the governor of width. It's an extremely important part for you to really grab a hold of. We're gonna call it the governor of width in the video.

                Okay, so now that you've heard me talk about the importance of having rotation and width in your golf swing, I wanna go ahead and give you two perfect examples of why width is going to be a variable in your golf swing.

                Now, let's start off by looking at player like Davis Love III who goes into this really really tall position with his hands and arms us to the top of the swing. He's got a ton of width available to him. What is he gonna have to take out of his equation in order to be able to have a good balance? Well, he's gonna have to take out rotation. Because if we get our hands and arms up into this really tall position, we're gonna have to be much more patient for the hands and arms to get down in front of us. So again, that's not a bad way to create a lot of efficiency in the golf swing.

                Now looking at things from a flip side there. If I went to a very low position here with my hands and arms so you can see my hands much lower than my right shoulder. You can see my arms kinda pulled back into my body here. What am I gonna have to rely on to help produce that speed and make up for width? Well I'm gonna rely more on rotation and more on leverage.

                Now rotation is one of those areas you gotta be really careful with in your down swing because that could start to put a lot of sheer force on your spine. And over time, that could leave you injured.

                So, now that you understand that we can use width in the golf swing as a variable, I'm going to teach you how to keep things kinda down the middle.

                All right. I'm going to give you a couple of key check points in the next part of this video. I'm going to talk to you about how to train it properly.

                Okay guys. So now that we have talked a little bit about the importance of having a good amount of balance between rotation and width in your golf swing, let's go ahead and get into today's drill so you can start to train your right arm properly in your golf swing. In turn, get yourself into a really good back swing position that's gonna allow you to become way more efficient.

                So, what I want you to do is I want you to go ahead and stand up. Okay. Get into proper stance width here. About two inches outside of neutral. Okay. Your just gonna stand vertically for now. Keep your shoulders back at a good neutral position. And I want you to just lift your right arm straight up right in front of you here. Okay. So lift it up to where your elbow is now the base of your chest. 

                Now this next point that I'm about to make is extremely important for those players that battle with their arms being a little too deep in their golf swing.

                When you lift your arm up, and your elbow is now the base of your chest. Okay. What I want you to make sure that your maintaining is the very, the connection between the very top of your bicep and the very top of your chest. Don't allow your arm to separate away from your body.

                Okay. So, when you left your arm up here. Okay this is what we call arm elevation or shoulder elevation around the sight, you wanna have your right elbow right at the base of your chest. We use this as a check point here to make sure we have a good balance between rotation width.

                Okay. So elbow gonna be right up at the base of the chest. Now the second function of our right arm is just going to be flexion. Okay. And this is happening once we've completed take away position. We are starting to flex our arm. And we really only going to flex it to about 80 or 90 degrees or so. Okay. So you can see my arms got about 80 or 90 degrees of flexion, my elbow is still at the base of my chest.

                Those two factors are gonna help give your golf club lift into the vertical plane.

                Now the third function is going to be a variable and what I mean by it being a variable is that some people just don't have the mobility in their shoulder to be able to do this. And this is what we call external humorous rotation.

                So if I've maintained the connection. I've got my arm flexed here to about 80 or 90 degrees, you can check how my extra external humorous rotation you have available to you by rotating your arm away from your face, or rotating your had away from your face.

                So you can see, I've got quite a bit here. Where some players can't rotate it past this position that I'm showing you now. That's not a big deal. It's not going to make or break your back swing. All it is is if you have some external humorous rotation it allows you to set the club a little bit more on plane at the top. Again, it's not going to make or break you.

                So, those are the three functions that are actually going on with your right arm through the entire take away and back swing. Obviously, the arms, the right arm, we don't really want to flex it at all very early one. We want to make sure we're maintaining as much width at possible through the take away position.

                So all the arm, all the right arm is doing is just a little bit of elevation. So you wanna train that in a gradual process. And we've got a video on the website called The Pool Noodle Short Elevation Video. That's got two check points to help you gradually help to build that in.

                But once we get through a take away position, then we're slowly starting to flex that right arm. And than the external humorous rotation helping us get the club really on that good plane position at the top of the swing.

                So, the reason why I wanted to show you these functions is, is that now we can tie this into a drill that's gonna help you get into that good spot at the top. And we're going to go ahead and add the club back into the mix. I wanna show you this from down the line. Okay.

                So we are still gonna stand up right here. Okay. I want you to go ahead and lift your right arm out in front of you. The clubs gonna feel pretty heavy at this point. Elbows gonna be right at the base of the chest. I'm gonna flex my arm, maintaining the connection between the top of my bicep and the top of my chest. I'm gonna flex it to about 80 to 90 degrees here. Okay and I'm going to externally rotate.

                Now, because the club head is going to feel really heavy at this point, you're gonna notice that your right wrist is gonna start to get some natural cocking and some natural hinging to it. Okay. Allow that to happen. Don't grip the club really tight and get the club, let, just feel like you're holding the club very lightly in the right hand and let the club kinda feel like it's sagging down here. Okay. It's almost gonna look like your right hand is like a support brace for your left arm at the top of the swing.

                So again, let's walk through this. Okay. Elbow right at the base of the chest, flex my arm, allow the club to just kinda rest in the right hand. Now what I'm going to do is I'm gonna grab it with my left hand. Okay. Keep my left arm fairly straight and relaxed. I'm gonna go into my golf posture. And than what I'm going to do is hold my arms, don't allow your arms to fall or sag, hold your arms where they are. Okay. And than just turn your body and your gonna notice that hey I've got a pretty good looking back swing position that's got a good amount of elevation in it.  I don't have my arms deep behind my body. I don't have my right elbow flying. And I certainly don't have my arms buried to my chest. Okay.

                So again, flexion, elbow at the base of the chest, let the club rest in the right hand, grab it with the left hand, and than turn your body, and you're gonna bet the club into that really good spot.

                Now how do you progress past this? Well, what you're gonna do from that new spot at the top is you're gonna swing down to impact and you're gonna go right back up to the top of your swing. That way is what it's gonna do is it's gonna start to train you to what it feels like to have your hands in a more elevated position.

                So, what I want you to do is I want you to start out without a golf club. I want you to do several reps, going through the processes. Than add the club back to the mix, go up to the top of your swing, hold your hands and arms there in a static position and than go ahead and work down to the bottom and right back up to the top. And your gonna see that you get that perfect on plane back swing position.  

 

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