Golf Swing Takeaway & Drills

The golf takeaway has been described by golf instructors countless ways, so many ways that it's impossible for the average golfer to have any real idea how to take the club back. Think of the fundamentals you may have heard or know about the takeaway and list them out now. Perhaps you said set your wrists early, shift to the right, lift your arms, put your left shoulder under your chin, point the club down the line, etc. The takeaway is a crucial part of the golf swing, but it's not that hard, in fact, it's only 2 inches of movement.

  • The most efficient takeaway involves only 2-3 inches of movement
  • Keep arms and shoulders connected to your core
  • Move the right shoulder blade in and down, toward your spine
  • Stay centered and rotate around your spine
  • This small movement provides 45 degrees of shoulder turn, with minimal hip rotation

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Joy
I’m finding out so much about how my body moves (and doesn’t move), and that’s pretty cool. Is it safe to say that when I’m in my setup with arms extended, if I feel my bicep activate first to initiate the shoulder pull, that’s incorrect? I can feel the difference compared to localizing it in the shoulder. I’m guessing that’s my old motor pattern of moving the club with my arms. So much unlearning to do!
April 26, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Joy. Yes. The bicep shouldn't be the first thing to initiate shoulder rotation. Try focusing on the abs/obliques. Take a look at 5 Minutes to Master Rotation Video.
April 26, 2021
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Joy
Thanks, Craig. I have watched just about everything on the takeaway that I could find and recorded about a good amount of starter reps on that drill. I see this as an extension of that video and met my brain’s processing capacity adding axis tilt, weight shift, and right ankle pressure. The arms just wanted to do the work automatically. I see this is where I need to spend some time grooving the shoulder and not the bicep before moving to the backswing. Thanks!
April 26, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Joy. Yes. The arms don't need to be the star of the show. Let the core and shoulder blade glide do the work for you.
April 26, 2021
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Joy
Appreciate the reply. I woke up with soreness in the lower point of my right scapula closest to my spine, I think I figured it out!
April 27, 2021
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Eric
Catching the momentum of the weight shift is a very good thing for me to stay on plane. If weight shift my body starts to rotate. But if finish with a flying elbow if I don’t do the shoulder blade glide at the end to pull my shoulder blade into my spine and finish elbow down. This confuses me because these videos discuss the shoulder glide early in the swing. Help, what is the proper sequence - weight shift, turn rib cage and shoulder glide? Sequential? Simultaneous? I like capturing the momentum of the weight shift, it gets the swing naturally on plane, so trying to understand how to supplement that. Thanks.
December 31, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Eric. Rotation, or weight shift can start the move. Most players use the weight as a good trigger. But, the core rotation and shoulder blade glide happen almost simultaneous in the takeaway. Think about is like weight to get going, core to start rotation, and glide to start getting shoulders really moving. The scapula will already move 2 inches in the takeaway down and in. All three components happen so fast it will feel pretty seamless.
January 1, 2021
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Eric
Thank you. almost simultaneous weight - rib cage - shoulder glide feels good in the mirror. JUST the shoulder glide and my core rotation stalls out half way through when my scapula gets down and in. Just rib cage core rotation with the shoulder glide and I get in a stuck position at the top. I bring it up because In so many videos on the takeaway there is emphasis on the shoulder blade glide which would be pre-rib cage or torso rotation. I just point it out as a pupil, it might be impeding progress for other member. I had a lesson from an RST instructor and he did the shoulder glide can cause issues In learning the proper movements. Thank you for the very timely response and thoughtful guidance.
January 1, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Eric. No problem for the added guidance. Thanks. Happy New Year.
January 1, 2021
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Eric
First of all, it is critical for me to be in the proper stance width. However, I have been trying to master this for a while. I can hit half shots with precision and beautiful compression. But when I go to the full swing things fall apart. If I get my right shoulder blade to I start pulling like a lawn mower. If I weight shift mechanically an inch or so to the right and initiate my right shoulder I also get off plane. It seems what works for me is feeling the momentum from the initial weight shift in proper stance width (too wide kills the weight shift and hands and arms takeover) and the shoulder glide becomes almost natural versus something that I initiate. Does this this make sense? This is a great video, but so much emphasis on the right shoulder blade glide seems different from what is working for me with natural momentum from weight shift. Thanks.
August 3, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Eric. Take a look at My Golf Backswing Secrets. Makes sense. Shift weight and rotate rib cage. The momentum will aid.
August 3, 2020
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James
question? how should the right bicep or trail arm bicep feel and look during the backswing? should it feel as if it is lifting? should the right bicep (for a right handed golfer) be facing the sky?? Thank you
April 5, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. Take a look at Right Arm Backswing Drill Video and 3 Functions of the Right Arm Video. You shouldn't feel a ton of lifting. More of less staying straight with some flexion. It can appear/feel like the trail bicep is facing upwards the entire way.
April 6, 2020
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Michael K
I do not see any deliberate axis tilt at set up. It looks like his shoulders are flat . Are we supposed have axis tilt when we do the drill ?
February 2, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Michael. Yes you should always be doing the swing drills with axis tilt.
February 3, 2020
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Darryl
When you get to the end of the takeaway, and into the backswing, do you lift your arms straight over you rear shoulder, or turn your shoulders to bring your arms over the rear shoulder?
November 7, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Darryl. You will continue to rotate your shoulders as the arms work up. The momentum from weight shift and rotation will help you achieve this, but also need to make sure it doesn't work deep. Take a look at My Golf Backswing Secrets and 4 Square Drill.
November 7, 2019
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Johnny
This is the best backswing video on the site. Much better than the dead drill video, which doesn’t tell you how to move the trail shoulder back.
October 26, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Johnny. Glad you liked the video. You can also use 5 Minutes to the Perfect Backswing and 5 Minutes to the Perfect Takeaway to really delve into the details. Also, Understanding Shoulder Blade Glide Video.
October 26, 2019
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Nick
Thanks Craig. I’ve looked at the 2 videos you recommended and also club in the navel. I still don’t understand how the club shaft goes from 45 deg to the target line (where it is when stuck in the navel) to parallel. Elevation would simply raise the club shaft on the same 45 deg angle. How does the butt end of the club get out of the navel and point down the target line? Isn’t this just a posed position, anticipating the rest of the backswing?
June 12, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Nick. The takeaway is a combination of weight shift, 45 degrees of shoulder rotation, forearm rotation, wrist set and elevation. This combo is creates the appearance of pointing down the target line. If you review the 5 Minutes to the Perfect Takeaway. Chuck will cover all those topics and perform the move very slowly which I think will show you the visual you are looking for. Also, think about the radius. Your shoulder movement is only 2 Inches with the trail scapula (creating 45 degrees), but the club is moving few feet.
June 13, 2019
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Nick
If the takeaway is complete when the shoulders have turned 45 deg, and the hands are still in front of the sternum, how can the shaft be parallel to the target line? Wouldn’t it be at 45 deg as well?
June 12, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Nick. There is slight elevation in the takeaway to keep it in front. Take a look at the 4 Square Drill and Pencil Tee Drill.
June 12, 2019
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Gary
Excellent video with succinct explanation and drill. 5 star! It took me a long time to get to this video! The info on this site is overwhelming. Please recommend similar videos with drills re the back swing, down swing & release. Many thanks,
February 17, 2019
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello, Gary, I'm glad you like the video! Haha, yes, there is a lot of content to look at. Most of it is specialized to hone in particular issues while you're trying to execute a particular move. However, there is a base video for each section. Check out the "5 minutes" series. 5 Minutes to the Perfect Golf Setup, 5 Minutes to the Perfect Golf Setup w/ weight shift, 5 minutes to master rotation, 5 minutes to the perfect golf takeaway, etc. If you need extra help, you can send in a swing review and we can guide you with an analysis of your swing.
February 17, 2019
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Ross
I have always wondered why we would want the toe of the club pointing straight up at the end of the take away. The more natural position would be matching the spine angle. Can you explain?
July 28, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ross. Take a look at Forearm Rotation in the Golf Swing for Power, Using the Wrists in the Golf Swing and Shake Hands Drill. Basically, you are going against physics and the design of the club.
July 29, 2018
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Ross
Thanks Craig. I looked at the videos you recommended. I still find it strange to focus on such a peripheral movement when the whole RST concept is that correct movement of the body will automatically make the club move properly. By the way, as an ex-physics teacher I can confirm that the shank into the pond goes with physics just as much as the perfect drive. Striving for mechanical efficiency is one thing. Going against physics is the stuff of science fiction.
July 29, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ross. Agreed about excessive focus in the periphery. But, the club wants to rotate. If you are manually creating tension that would be the only way for it not too. Rotating properly around the spine with lack of tension in the arms should allow for free rotation without too much thought.
July 29, 2018
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Samuel
Can you tell me the first move in the takeaway? Does it start with the should blade glide, weight shift or both. What do you recommend to initial the takeaway?
March 21, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Sam. It can be player dependent due to the motor patterns they have already ingrained. However, we recommend starting with weight shift into rotation.
March 21, 2018
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Kerry
thanks for another great video. a question to clarify -- after practicing the drill pulling with the right shoulder and right obliques, I think I over-rotate, and take the club inside the target line. Is it correct that once the club is on that line, that's when the arms lift it to the top of the backswing? Guy
March 9, 2018
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Kerry
Thanks Craig. Where can I find 5 minutes to the perfect takeaway? I search for it on the dashboard, but it doesn't come up.
March 9, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Guy. You must have a little gradual elevation in the takeaway to keep it in front (4 Square Drill, Pool Noodle Drill, and 5 Minutes to the Perfect Takeaway). If you tend to swing the arms inside the tendency would be to stop rotating and let the arms swing deep or in some cases solely lift.
March 9, 2018
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Kerry
thanks Craig. Where can I find 5 minutes to the perfect takeaway? I search for it on the dashboard, but it doesn't come up.
March 9, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Guy. Type it in the search box exactly like this "Golf Takeaway, 5 Minutes to the Perfect Golf Takeaway".
March 9, 2018
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Alex
Thank you Rotary Swing! The concept of Rotary Swing makes so much sense and although I am not doctor or golf professional, I agree with every concept and fundamental Rotary Swing provides. I have a general question not related to this video. A right side dominant player who plays right handed can have a tendency to push with their right side which often causes an over the top downswing. What is the general tendency of a left side dominant person playing right handed? I would think that would be the ideal combination since it would be more natural to pull with their dominant left side on the downswing and eliminate an over the top pushing technique. Your response would be greatly appreciated. Thank you
March 5, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Alex. Much appreciative of our site and swing logic. Glad you are enjoying the process. A lead side dominant player playing right handed would have an issue of too much lag and shallow path. If you've ever heard of the term on tour "he got stuck" on the downswing. Typically, its because the better player pulls too hard and doesn't give him/her self a chance to release their angles.
March 6, 2018
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Chris
I seem to have a tendency to loose my axis tilt when I focus on right should pulling back. Kind of like left shoulder coming makes my head want to move towards the target (reverse pivot .. ish). Probably some bad habits creeping in. Suggestions on points to focus on to overcome this.
March 5, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Chris. As you shift in the backswing. You will tend to lose a slight bit of tilt due to the shifting. Take a look at How to Fix Golf Reverse Pivot. You may need to do some body drills (even exaggerated to overcome your move).
March 5, 2018
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Richard
So the left shoulder should "go down" in the backswing. Not possible without producing a reverse pivot. I am really confused by that comment.
February 6, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Richard. You are not trying to push the lead shoulder down. But, you are rotating around a hinged forward spine. While rotating around a hinged forward spine and maintaining tilt (Importance of Axis Tilt Video) you shouldn't reverse pivot. The lead shoulder will work down slightly, but not because you pushed it there.
February 6, 2017
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Alex
Chuck makes it sound so simple... I have a problem with left arm (I swing right handed) moving across my chest during the takeaway which limits the shoulder rotation. This also causes the club to get inside and an open club face because of some unnecessary forearm rotation. Please help. Thank you
January 28, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Alex. Practice the 2 Inch hand drill in the Role of the Right Arm Video. Take your setup and place your hands at address 2 inches apart with the fingertip length the same. Maintain the gap and fingertip length throughout the takeaway. If you do, you should feel rotation and less lead arm push.
January 29, 2017
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Ron
Keeping my right arm straight and hands passive during the takeaway has helped quite a bit with more solid ball striking and distance with the driver. I love the more controlled compact swing. But I am loosing my touch with shorter clubs such as my sand wedge, full to 3/4 wedges, and shots around the green. From watching videos of these types of shots it appears the right arm folds much quicker than with full longer shots. Is that correct?
January 28, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ron. It's not necessarily that it will fold quicker. But, you will tend to have a quicker hinge or set in the wrist. For full wedges, the trail arm will stay pretty straight. Pitches and feel shots will have a little more wrist set/hinge earlier on in the move.
January 28, 2017
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Leigh
My club is slightly closed when I complete my backswing. Is this ok or could it mean my grip is too strong?
December 22, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Leigh. A slightly closed position means the grip is either a little strong or a little shut in the takeaway. Use the Winter Golf Training Program - Backswing Video to help.
December 22, 2016
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Paul
Loved these drills. I hit practice balls today concentrating on the two inch right shoulder takeaway with outstanding results. No hooks which is my major nemesis. The club seemed to go back more easily on plane. Thanks for this tip.
July 13, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Paul. Great. Happy to hear the improvement.
July 14, 2016
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John
Great summation!
July 13, 2016
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Glad you liked it John!
July 13, 2016
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sandeep
Hi, as you start the takeaway by using the shoulder blade glide and pulling your right shoulder towards your right ear, how should the arms move? - should they move more horizontally from address position to the shaft parallel to the ground position or should they move more vertically from address position to the shaft parallel to the ground position?
June 27, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Sandeep. The arms move vertically in the golf swing. Take a look at Understanding Shoulder Elevation and the 4 Square Drill.
June 27, 2016
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Hector
HELLO, I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER FOR A COUPLE OF YEARS BUT I DON'T UNDERSTAND YET THE CONCEPT OF THE SHOULDER BLADE IN THE TAKEAWAY. I UNDERSTAND THE THEORY BUT HOW I PUT THE SHOULDER BLADE OR HOW I CAN ROTATE MY SHOULDERS WITH THE BLADE DOWN AND MEDIALLY I CAN NOT DO IT??? GIVE ME A DRILL OR SOMETHING I CAN PNTRODUCE TO MY SWING WHERE I CAN DO IT THAT MOVEMENT, LIKE I DONT KNOW TO KEEP THE L ARM FIXED TO THE ARMPIT, TO KEEP THE RIGTH ARMPIT CLOSE TO THE CHEST ??? I DONT KNOW SOMETHING, THANKS
June 9, 2016
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anthony
The best way to think about it is how you would load your shoulder when throwing a ball really hard. Or throwing a really heavy ball. You can get this sitting or standing. the swing is IDENTICAL. simply look straight in front of you at something on the wall. Now imagine your going to throw a 3 pound lead ball right through the wall. JUST DO A NORMAL, POWERFUL THROWING MOTION AND SEE WHAT YOUR BACK FEELS LIKE AND HOW YOUR SHOULDER KIND OF PULLS DOWN AS YOU LOAD FOR POWER. THAT IS THE GOLF SWING!!!! LOAD JUST LIKE THAT EVERY TIME!!! WATCH THE 20 MINUTE THROW THE BALL DRILL TO DIAL THIS IN. THIS DRILL WILL GIVE YOU THE STRONGEST INDICATION ON WHAT YOU SHOULD FEEL IN THE TAKE AWAY. But whatever you do.....DON'T think of it as a over the top throw. it's more like skipping a stone.
July 14, 2016
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Richard
FINALLY . The absolute best description of the required movement of the shoulder blade. Thank you . Thank you . Thank you.
February 6, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Hector. You don't want to fix the arms to the chest due to the fact you will need to elevate during the golf swing. The 2 inch hand drill (maintaining the gap and fingertip length throughout) in the Role of the Right Arm Video should help give you a proper feeling. The shoulder blade only move 2 inches down and in during the takeaway. You might be trying to over use it. Also, add the Body Rotation in the Golf Backswing to help.
June 10, 2016
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Michael
Craig, I've also been a member for a couple of years and tried to follow the videos and descriptions to a tee. I focused too much on the glide as a separate thought and was not able to stop taking the club inside too early. It wasn't until I added the thought that the shoulder elevation needs to start immediately with the turn that the light bulb went on and the club ends up on plane every time. At first it felt like it went against everything I ever learned about taking the club back low and slow, but with relatively little practice and the thought of elevating my arms (and therefore the club) at the start everything came together and I'm now getting the accuracy, trajectory and power RST touts in the videos. i think it would help your students to emphasize this more. In Chuck's video it looks like he merely turns using the glide, but if you don't elevate simultaneously the club will end the takeaway in a down and inside position.
June 23, 2016
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James
I look on camera and my left elbow pit is rotated over. I know this could be because of pushing from the left side. will keeping the left elbow pit the same as address help me get on plain going into the backswing.
May 29, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. There will need to be some forearm rotation and the elbow will rotate slightly. However, you can over do it. Take a look at the Winter Series Backswing Video.
May 29, 2016
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Greg
I am having trouble with the takeaway. During the first few inches I am starting the club outside. I have noticed this tendency even when chipping which can lead to shanks. Could insufficient axis tilt be part of the problem? Could you give me some ideas on cause and possible solutions. Thanks!
May 25, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Greg. Could be axis tilt. Also, the trail hand staying on top due to being too weak on the club. Grip Tips to check trail hand positioning. Bucket Drill, Forearm Rotation in the Golf Swing for Power, and Pencil Tee Video to help.
May 26, 2016
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Troy
When I practice pulling the right shoulder in towards centre (spine) it often feels like I'm reverse pivoting or not shifting my weight to the right leg properly. Is this the correct feeling or is it possible I'm doing something wrong?
May 25, 2016
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Are you starting with enough axis tilt at address?? Are you making sure you are getting 80-85% of your weight into your trail foot before rotating? Make sure that after you shift the weight into the trail side that you are keeping the trail leg flexed and facing forward to help stabilize the pelvis and keep you from over rotating into a reverse pivot.
May 25, 2016
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anthony
I'm starting to think is should be required to watch the "throw the ball drill" video once a week to retain membership...lol. I've shown dozens of people the key points in this drill and what it forces and it cures HUNDREDS of the little finicky issues people get wrapped up in, wrist set, weight shift, axis tilt, loading fully into the right side, transition...ect. I think most people watch it once, feel its awkward, and don't keep working at it. I watch it 3 times a week now and follow along like I'm teaching it. Then when I do go out with people and show them as we golf, I have the best rounds of play. I can even shut my eyes now before the take away on the course and produce better strikes imagining "throwing a ball" Just takes actual practice and confidence.
July 14, 2016
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Michael
That's great - thank you.
May 9, 2016
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Gary
Did they give you a trigger because I'm looking for that too. As much as I concentrate on pulling the right shoulder back sometimes it just won't move
June 10, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Michael. You're welcome!
May 9, 2016
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Michael
In my comment below I am asking for a "swing trigger" to start the backswing. Thank you
May 8, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Michael. I gotcha.
May 9, 2016
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Michael
May I ask what are good ways to start the takeaway e.g. forward press, small kick in of the right knee. What does Rotary swing recommend? Also do you recommend a waggle before the takeaway? Thank you
May 8, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Michael. We don't like too much of a forward press or excessive waggle. However, you can trigger the swing by starting with your weight shift into the trail glute.
May 9, 2016
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David
New member mesmerized by the material and presentation. Am I correct that the "in the box" set up is essential to execute the blade glide and further if you can maintain the position of the shoulder blade into the first downswing motion then over the top movements are suppressed if not nearly impossible?
May 7, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello David. The box setup should be the shoulders slightly depressed to stay away from rounding or early protraction. It is important to be in the box to execute the proper shoulder blade glide for the takeaway. Staying in the box would make it hard to come over the top.
May 9, 2016
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Richard
When I take the club away the club head goes well outside the target line... What would be the cause of that?
April 22, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Richard. Typically, lead side push or over elevating. Take a look at the Pushing from the Left Side Video and the 4 Square Drill to not over elevate.
April 22, 2016
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Orlando
I have struggled with this and I wonder if it is because I am rotating entire upper torso with the shoulder blade glide than just shoulder blade glide which would then pull entire upper torso into backswing. I believe this is leading to too much arm elevation at the start of the swing. Any help is appreciated.
April 14, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Orlando. You will use the trail shoulder blade and the core for rotation in the takeaway. However, you still can over use the core/torso going back. Try to get a good feel for the trail shoulder pull and not over activating the torso with the 2 inch hand drill in the Role of the Right Arm Video.
April 14, 2016
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Dave
Hi Craig. I am trying to really groove this feeling and have made great progress using the shaft upside down. I am working also on keeping the arms relaxed. The big problem I am finding is that when I relax my arms using the club the right way up, I do t have enough to lift the club off he ground which means I tend to have to manually lift it which then seems to start the takeaway with the hands which is exactly the opposite to what we want. So should the club head rest on the ground at set up or hover slightly? Also how should my arms feel? I can't find a half way point between them bring too straight and tight and now too limp and soft. Any tips?
April 12, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dave. Preferably, setup up on the ground. However, I hovered for years. You just have to monitor the tension even more. Grip pressure will be about a 2 at setup (1-10 Scale 1 being the weakest). You need to have enough to control the club. Being too limp is detrimental.
April 12, 2016
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Peteroflanagan77@gmail.com
As a 72 year old who played off between 4 and 8 handicap until 3 years ago,when a significant loss of distance has me out to 11. Your video has convinced me to change from taking the club away with sternum and arms (with shoulders responding ) and a downswing dominated with push off right side to a backswing as described in this video. My first practice session has given me huge hope----from simply using the right shoulder to turn back on itself and ensuring that my shirt buttons and navel turned with it (and conscious that left arm pronated slightly by itself) I am back hitting a 5iron 170 yards ,an addition of 30 yards. One question ,if I may, to do with downswing-----I found the videos on downswing a little hard to follow. By jamming left heel straight into ground (having retained the squat posture in backswing), dragging butt of shaft to ball and really concentrating on right hip (quads?) helping right forearm release clubhead past the hands I believe I got max results and a great strike sound-----also a wide thro path that finished with knuckle on left hand facing the ground (without any manipulation). Am I ok to stick with concept of dragging butt down but with the image of clubhead passing hands at impact? Or do I need to go to a particular video to work on----but man I do love the results with the above . Hoping to hear from you, Peter.
April 8, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Peter. Glad to hear you are happy the results and using a "bigger muscle" driven swing. In regards to the downswing. I would take a look at the Weight Shift Video Part 1 and the Frisbee Drill. The Weight Part 1 will help you use the shift and some torso to help pull the arms down versus just dragging the butt and the Frisbee Drill will help you feel at home getting to the release position with your current thoughts. I like the notion of the club head passing hands/chest at impact.
April 8, 2016
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Gordon
I am struggling to get the math right. If the shoulder turn is 45 degrees for the takeaway and the hip turn is minimal (say 5-10 degrees) I am not sure how the club at the end of the takeaway is parallel to the target line if one is keeping the hands directly in front of the chest (in other words the left arm is not coming across the chest). Am I missing something? Is there a certain amount of right wrist hinge? Or is there external rotation of the right arm?
March 14, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gordon. It is due to shoulder elevation. You don't want to hinge back the trail wrist in the takeaway or create external humeral rotation. Take a look at the Understanding Shoulder Elevation Video and the 4 Square Drill.
March 14, 2016
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jukka
You say that you make the takeaway by rotating your upper body and you have not any hip action there. What if I have some hip action before the 9 a`clock position? What is the effect? Do I lose or win something? Or is it only a good way easily to learn to rotate a golf swing rightly? -Roger
March 8, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jukka. It is okay to have a little hip action. The key is to let the hip get pulled, not force excessive rotation early. You will lose a little torque (separation between upper and lower half), but more important that you do rotate properly and load the glute. Take a look at the Weight Shift Video Part 2.
March 8, 2016
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Loran
The takeaway then is largely controlled by the right shoulder blade rotating around and down? I need not focus on the arms and swaying to the right side to shift? I don't even have to look at my arms leading away?
February 16, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Loan. The takeaway is largely controlled by the trail shoulder turn. However, you will need a little elevation to keep the club in front. 4 Square Drill and Pool Noodle Drill.
February 16, 2016
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Loran
Then, the Pool Noodle Drill is the next step in elevation? Does it belong to the class of the takeaway or more of a transition between two steps that separate the takeaway and the backswing? If I am short in stature, with short legs, the takeaway will be lower?
February 22, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Loan. The amount of elevation can be variable from student to student. However, I don't believe in your case it will tend to be lower in the takeaway. The Pool Noodle will belong in the takeaway and backswing. You have to have a little in the initial going to keep the club working in front of the sternum.
February 22, 2016
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Jack
Re takeaway - shoulder level as you turn away. How are you creating tilt? At least as I follow the vids, it doesn't seem like really addressed; I'm told by my local instructor that my shoulders remain too level throughout the my rotary swing takeaway; as I create 2 inches of right shoulder blade turn, should I also feel my left shoulder dip or drop a bit as I turn away to get tilt?
January 30, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jack. The hinge forward will create the tilt that you are looking for in the swing. You are rotating around a forward hinged spine. The left shoulder will work slightly below the right. The key is not to push the left shoulder down to move the right.
January 30, 2016
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Donald
Hello. Is keeping the bicep pinned to the pec throughout the backswing a good swing thought.? Feel that when doing this that the arms might be too close to the body and loosing out on the wide narrow wide feeling..
January 20, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Donald. You want to keep a little bit of a connection between the upper pectoral and upper bicep. But, you don't want to glue the trail bicep to the chest.
January 20, 2016
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Nacho
Craig, Chris, would u be kind enough to comment something on backswing triggers, specially kick in the right knee ala Gary Player? I'm curtently experiencing some kind of 'brain freeze' and this is helping me to start my backswing. I would like to know the effects on swing tempo, rotation, shoulder elevation & flexion. Thank u!!
January 17, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Nacho. The kick in isn't the most common out there. If your kick in with the knee isn't creating any push or too much active rotation with the hips it would be ok. Typically, this move you are referring too is the same one a lot of players use (without visually seeing the kick). Weight shift is a great trigger to start the swing. Start the swing by starting with weight shift or loading the trail glute. If will help with the freeze.
January 18, 2016
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Nacho
Thank u. From RST do u recommend any in particular? Have a great day!
January 19, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Nacho. I definitely recommend to my players that struggle with the takeaway to start a small shift into their trail glute early to start the swing. The little bit of rock or momentum helps keep them from freezing over the ball.
January 19, 2016
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Darran
What angle should the club face be at end of take away. I have read two different things. Either the same as the spine angle about 30 degrees closed or the toe of club should defacing up, so 0 degrees or verticals. Thanks
December 26, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Darran. The club should be vertical (toe up). Take a look at Forearm Rotation in the Takeaway and the RST Pencil Tee Drill.
December 28, 2015
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Loran
Do the arms stay straight in the takeaway...there is no bending at at the elbows at the end of the of the takeaway? I noticed Chuck's arms straight and relaxed through the rotation and takeaway? I see some players on tour fold their elbows during the takeaway? Which is the correct movement?
December 1, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Loan. The arms will remain relaxed and straight in the takeaway. Take a look at the Role of the Right Arm and the Pushing with the Left Side Video.
December 2, 2015
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Stephen
Hi Craig, in my review you showed a video of chucks swing and set up. You drew a line straight down from his shoulder, down through his elbow. His hands appeared to be in front of the line. Is this correct. Where do I draw the line when I am analysing my swing. It looks as if it is a line starting an inch posterior to the front of the shoulder on the down the line view. Stephen
November 30, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Stephen. I sent you an email.
November 30, 2015
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william
5 minutes to a better rotation great,,my shoulder stay relaxed and not agressive able to finish swing staying to stay in the box,,,thanks
November 28, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello William. I am pleased to hear you are improving. Thanks for the post.
November 28, 2015
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Jason
during this right shoulder take away, can you describe what the left (front) hand/ wrist is doing during the initial from the perspective of golfer? I presume it is not moving straight back parallel to the toeline is the left wrist hand moving diagonal toward the right (back) foot initially?
November 24, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jason. It will be working on a similar arc to the club. It will not move straight back, but a tiny arc matching the swing path and rotation of the body. You can see a little of the left arm swing in the Using the Wrist Effectively and Efficiently Video.
November 24, 2015
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Rob
Hi, you way on the video" moving my right schouderblade intorch my spine and slightly down". What do you mean with " slightly down" ? Kind regards, Rob
November 19, 2015
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Rob
My right schouder is going up when i turn i mean. Kind regards, Rob
November 19, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Rob. The shoulder blade to create rotation actually works towards the spine and down. Diagonally across the rib cage. To understand better take a look at the Connect to the Core Video (you can feel the down). Also, the Understanding Shoulder Blade Glide Video.
November 19, 2015
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Djamil
Hi, I have a question if you just turn the shoulders, how the club can be parallel to the ground? When i make it the club stays near the ground and as my shoulder it is only 45°. When i see the finish of your take away the club is parallel to the ground and 90° What did i miss? Ty
November 5, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Djamil. You have to have some elevation and wrist set. Take a look at Understanding Shoulder Elevation, 4 Square Drill and the RST Pencil Tee Drill.
November 5, 2015
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Hector
I did not understand how to move the shoulder blade in the takeaway , my question is the takeaway is basically more right shoulder movement , but how I move the shoulder blade , I need a drill or what shoul I feel in the takeaway ?, thanks
November 3, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Hector. You will feel the blade, but it is a small movement (only 2 inches). Take a look at the Role of the Right Arm Video and the Golf Body Rotation in the Backswing. The 2 inch hand drill maintaing the space and finger tip length will help. Also, separating the feeling between the upper half and lower half rotation from both of those two videos.
November 3, 2015
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paul
Hi when I do this the club ends up closed.
October 29, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Paul. Take a look at the Bucket Drill, Forearm Rotation in the Golf Swing and the RST Pencil Tee Drill.
October 29, 2015
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James
Hi craig pressing my feet into the ground can that act as a brake to stop my hips turning with my shoulders ? Iam struggling with this craig !
October 26, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. The glutes are the hip stabilizers in the golf swing. Pushing the feet into the ground can help you feel the glutes a little better. But, I wouldn't think it would be the ultimate fix.
October 26, 2015
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James
Hi craig just played today and a lot better my 1st move in the takeaway was turning my right oblique everything sort of fell into place then i pushed into the ground with my left foot to start the downswing and tried the throw the ball drill just before impact my ball flight was much better more consistant these 3 things i will concentrate on for now i dont want to many swing thoughts until i get these right do you agree ? Thanks james b
October 12, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey James. Great. Yes, too many thoughts can be a killer. You have a simple enough plan that hits most of the high points.
October 13, 2015
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James
Hi iam struggling with the takeaway its easy without a club but when i put my arms down its hard what am i doing wrong ??????
October 11, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. I would think you are still trying to move the club head versus letting the body dictate the location. Start with the club flipped to the club head end and train moving the club solely with body. Don't try to put it in a position. Take care of the body and the club will follow.
October 12, 2015
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James
Hi thanks Steven mayes for my golf review I now no what to work on its probably going to take all winter but nothing comes easy right cheers james B.
October 10, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. I will pass along the good word. Good luck with the changes during the winter!
October 10, 2015
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Stephen
Hi Craig, you mentioned in my review that you want me to rotate and settle into the glute in a more continuous motion rather than concentrate on the trail side stamp (backswing) that I was working on. This was to stop the club working out in front of the ball. My hands were going outside and then fixing themselves. Whilst practising I have improved the takeaway. However, the club is still moving out in front of the ball slightly. This happening early on in the takeaway. From looking at Chucks 8 iron down the line view, It appears that I am doing most things correctly. However, chucks club face rotates back perfectly as he performs the shoulder glide. Could my club going out because that I am not rotating my forearms enough early on in the takeaway or will i just concentrate on what you explained in your review? Thanks for help. Stephen
October 5, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Stephen. Concentrating on the rotation of the body should help. I didn't see an issue with the forearms not rotating enough early. Take a look at the 5 Min to Master Rotation.
October 5, 2015
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Mike
I am confused about how the arms can stay out in front of the body like they are at address at the end of the takeaway when the shoulders have turned 45 degrees and the club has turned 90 degrees. The picture of Chuck up above illustrates what I am talking about. His arms are not in the same position as they are at address at the end of the takeaway. I am also confused about how to rotate the arms to get the club to point up the air at the end of the takeaway. When I do this I seem to be pushing the club back with my arms. It is hard to rotate the arms without pushing the club some what with the arms at the same time.
September 24, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Mike. A few videos for you to check out. Understanding Shoulder Elevation (to answer how the club stays in front of the body). Forearm Rotation in the Golf Swing, Using the Wrist Effectively and Efficiently, and the RST Pencil Tee Drill (how to get the club toe up and why).
September 24, 2015
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Aaron
Yep simple, got it straighten out. I was was not looking at the cupping properly, the grip and address as been fairly fundamental, though I'll be slightly less aggressive for lack of better term. Now I can continue through the take without issue.
September 20, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Aaron. Sounds like you have it figured out now. Let us know if you need further assistance.
September 21, 2015
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Aaron
I haven't had time to send in a swing analysis, on my ASAP todo list. I've been golfing most of my life, I should understand basic fundamentals of set up. The bucket drills and rotation drills show no left hand push. However, for some reason, I feel like my left wrist should be a bit more cupped, it feels a bit to straight, my first inclination being the club slight ahead if the ball, but then I feel a bit exaggerated. I set up ver relaxed, I don't feel I reach. I am afraid the lack of cupping continues through my takeaway any thoughts what I might be missing? I'm sure it's something simple and covered in one of these numerous and helpful videos.
September 20, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Aaron. Take a look at the One Simple Takeaway Fix to understand better about the wrist cupping.
September 21, 2015
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Douglas
Hey Guys, I was wondering if the rotary connect for the takeaway drills is a good idea. I own one and I want to use it because it make you feel very connected.
September 15, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Douglas. You can certainly use the rotary connect with your takeaway drills.
September 15, 2015
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Paul
steve, you have looked at my first video and iam working on the takeaway specifically on the right arm what is the best thing to do next would i send another video of a full swing or one of me doing the drill my thinking is that even though i can do the drill properly does not mean i am executing it in my full swing
September 14, 2015
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Steven (Certified RST Instructor)
Paul- If you feel you have made some good progress send in a full swing, if you feel you are struggling with the drills in the takeaway I would send in the vidoes of you doing the drill, that way we can get a close look at what is occuring.
September 15, 2015
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Bill
I just did my first practice session of Move 1. My first video diagnosis showed that I was pushing with my left shoulder and folding my right arm immediately on takeaway. This is why I get no width on my swing which reduces my club head speed. I did 150 slow "reps" and it feels very different than my usual takeaway. I felt a tightness in my right shoulder. Is this a normal sensation until I get used to the new takeaway move?
September 10, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Bill. Feeling a little tightness in the early going is very normal. You are engaging new muscles in your swing.
September 11, 2015
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Bill
Hi Craig, I tried to find my thread but cant. Anyway I uploaded a new couple of videos. If you could take a look that would be great.
March 12, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Bill. Looking at it as I type.
March 12, 2016
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Bill
Hi Craig, Just listened to your review. You explained it perfectly and I understand. I really appreciate your time and your reviews have been really great and very helpful. Back to work.
March 12, 2016
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James
Hi, I've been working hard on the takeaway. Your videos are great. However, I'm not sure where my left arm should be when I turn my shoulders. should it end up pointing down the target line, inside of that? Then when my right arm flexes, does my left arm continue up, but on target line or come inside that? Thanks.
September 9, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. The left arm will be pointing down the target line. As you fold the right arm the left arm will start to add more rotation. Rotating as a function of folding the right arm. You can see the rotation well in the Checkpoints Video.
September 9, 2015
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James
Thanks. I'll check it out.
September 9, 2015
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David
Hi The one concept I find confusing is advocating the Move 1 takeaway as 45 deg shoulder blade glide yet the club is parallel to target line as seen in Chuck pic above. This suggests to me some arm movement across the chest. Otherwise club should also be at 45 to remain in front of chest. What am I missing?
September 8, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello David. The arms elevate to stay in-front and give you the image you see. Take a look at Understanding Shoulder Elevation and the 4 Square Drill.
September 9, 2015
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Stephen
Hi Craig, If u don't complete your takeaway does this effect your downswing, as in how steep the club will be in the downswing? Stephen
September 6, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Stephen. If you tend to overuse the arms in the takeaway and under rotate. You will tend to lift the club with arms only to the top. Therefore, from this positioning if you start to add a little body on the downswing for power it will tend to steepen a little too much in front.
September 7, 2015
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Stephen
Thank you
September 7, 2015
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Jason
is this the correct imagery: when visualizing the takeaway, imagine what you would do to putt. Not the straight back and through type of putt, but the more natural shoulder rotation arc type putt. once you get that direction in mind, have the trail shoulder/ upper trail side arm complex "pull" in the same direction (of that putting movement) and you are on your way--> just add the arm elevation and be toe up with the club by the time the hands are at the trail thigh about pocket high. I notice by the time I get to that position, I already have rotated the shoulders 45° and the only thing left to do is possibly some more arm elevation but definitely right arm flexion--the further "rotation" to finish the backswing, comes from hip recruitment. (I found out it was so hard to convert the appropriate rotation when doing it hands in front of the chest to when the arms are down in front of you---> until I realized the above visual)
September 4, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jason. It sounds like you are on the right track. Visualizing rotating around the spine and pulling from the shoulder as in a putt.
September 4, 2015
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Jason
finally. thx. can't believe how hard it "was" for me to even start correctly.
September 5, 2015
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Arnie
Chuck makes it sound like this is all you have to do to get the club in the right position at the end of move one. If that's the case, then why are there so many other videos on so many aspects of the take away? Are these to correct other things people may add to the take away that aren't necessary or are harmful? I'm not being facetious; I'm just trying to understand how I should integrate the teaching from all the other take away videos with this one.
September 3, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Arnel. Yes, it is to help players takeaway unnecessary additions or specific advice to cure their ailment. Also, the vast majority of the takeaway is completed by shoulder rotation. But, there are subtle little cues to make it perfect. All described in the 5 Mins to a Perfect Takeaway.
September 3, 2015
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russell
isnt there a tendency that can start to put into a reverse C position, seems over complicating the initial move to me.
August 27, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Russel. The only way to reverse C by pulling the shoulder blade is tilting, not rotating. Make sure you know how to rotate properly. Golf Body Rotation Video. Also, take a look at the Importance of Axis Tilt Video.
August 28, 2015
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Ryan
I caught myself over complicating this concept in the swing (as usual) and wrenching my left shoulder blade back. The move is also not as natural to me since I throw right handed but swing (in golf and baseball) lefty. Have you had anyone else run into a similar problem, or do you have any good suggestions for this? I also push my hands/arms out away from me and get very lifty with them. Thanks!
August 18, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ryan. I was a victim of shoulder blade wrenching. I think a good way to think about it is the blade only moves 2 inches in the takeaway. You can't rush 2 inches and/or pull to max capacity only to have it move 2 inches. Keep is soft. Soft to swing, but aware enough to engage.
August 18, 2015
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Ryan
Is it a good thought to feel like I'm rotating my sternum? I feel like that forces my upper body to rotate and helps me feel tension building in my obliques
August 18, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ryan. If thinking sternum helps you feel the pull with oblique and shoulder blade, then go for it. However, if you concentrate on the sternum. You need to monitor that you could start rounding a little in the shoulders and/or overly tensing the pectorals.
August 19, 2015
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randal
So is all ,if not most, of the so called "x factor" ie. coil differential between the hips and trunk accomplished in the take away as discussed in the " 5 minutes" video ? The othe power sources being width and leverage ie lag? And do you feel it the right lats, abs and obliques?
August 16, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Randall. You will start to build torque "x factor" in the takeaway. The separation could get a little bigger to the top, but the vast majority will be from the beginning. Your power sources will be your rotation, leverage and width. Yes, you should feel the core/box muscles.
August 17, 2015
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John
I feel the rotary swing is doing great things for my swing and I am totally committed to it. I have a problem though that I struggle with. I am 69 years of age but still manage to play to a single figure handicap, despite an occasional shank that sets me back. I have noticed as I get towards the end of my backswing my right hand is coming away from the grip. Any tips as to how I correct this and is that likely to contribute to an occasional shank. John
August 16, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello John. (For Right Handed Player). You could have a grip issue. Take a look at the Golf Grip How To Video. Make sure with the right hand that you are securing the thumb and hand together allowing yourself to properly support the club at the top of the swing while helping secure the right index finger in place on the grip. Maintain a little more pressure. It could lead to the occasional shank due to loss of ability to keep the club stable.
August 17, 2015
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Evan
On the takeaway if face is closed at hip high , should work be done on rotation?
August 14, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Evan. You want the face to rotate. Take a look at the Unleash Your Thumbnail for Power and the RST Pencil Tee Drill to help with getting the proper location.
August 14, 2015
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Evan
Are they in the takeaway videos?
August 15, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Evan. You can use the search box at the top right of your screen and/or located in the Advanced Takeaway Section.
August 15, 2015
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leontis
Why should you move right shoulder slightly down while pulling towards spine? If it moves down this would seem contrary to standard instruction, which is to move left shoulder down and right shoulder up during backswing.
August 14, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Leontis. Take a look at a few videos for me. Push Versus Pull, Pushing with the Left Side, and Understanding Shoulder Blade Glide. You goal is to pull and rotate around the spine. Forcing the lead shoulder down and the right shoulder up creates a false rotation and not a lot of big muscle recruitment.
August 14, 2015
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BRIAN
Have been working hard on the takeaway, but sometimes the right elbow moves out of position causing a shut face and a pull left. The only way I can prevent this is to move the club first before the turn. I notice the pro's also seem to make this subtle move. Jason Dufner in particular. Your comments would be appreciated.
August 10, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Brian. Take a look at the Part 5 Video Using Your Wrist for Speed in the Introduction Advanced Section. You want to shy away from early wrist motion. It doesn't take a whole lot of muscle recruitment and starts the momentum of the club by pushing versus pulling.
August 10, 2015
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Jordan
How do I transition from the takeaway to the backswing ? I have a problem where I can do the two moves seperately but I can't get it in my head how to blend the two in my Golfswing and I have a really hard team rling my hands or pushing with the hands and getting the club really inside earlier and having to make corrections to get it back on pla earbud top and downswing. I have a draw / hook pattern in my misses. How can I finally figure out how to get the takeaway and backswing to be perfect and be one fluid motion !? It's the only thing holding back my game
August 8, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jordan. Take a look at the Move 2 Video and try it in pieces then blending. Also, flip the club around a grab the club head end. It was much easier in my RST move to learn by taking the club head out of the equation early. Get the motion down, then flip the club back.
August 8, 2015
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Peter R
I'm really confused about cause and effect here. Unfortunately, I have no awareness of shoulder blade movement. On the other hand, I certainly can pull my right shoulder back. So, we're I to pull my right shoulder back rotating about 45 degrees, would my shoulder blade have moved as desired? If so, why are we talking about shoulder blades rather than shoulders? It would appear I'm in need of some guidance which I happily await!
August 3, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Peter. We try to be very specific and objective when looking at the swing. The shoulder blade is what creates the turn. Yes, pulling your shoulder behind the head will get the blade to move properly if in the box. We just explained it in a technical way versus lamens terms. You sound like you are on the right track.
August 4, 2015
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Peter R
Thanks Craig for your reply. Please understand that it is NOT my purpose to be argumentative. Rather, I really want to understand what is being said so as to incorporate the RST information into my swing development. Having said that, I don't understand how the floating shoulder blade can cause movement rather than being moved by that which it is floating upon. Or, have I simply reinforced the fact I know little of shoulder anatomy? Looking forward to another reply.
August 4, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Peter. No worries. Questions are welcomed. I think you have reinforced shoulder movement. It is a muscle that you have already used over and over again to your advantage. For example: You workout a muscle. In the beginning, the muscle is sore because of lack of use. Then, the muscle gets used to a certain motion. And, without adding extra weight or exaggeration it is hard to feel the same tension or soreness. Take a look at the Golf Body Rotation Video in the Advanced Backswing Section. If you turn yourself against a chair. You will see that you rotate, but the blade gets pushed against the chair. The motion of the blade moving down and in to create a shoulder turn.
August 4, 2015
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sambhu
Can you guys suggest how to move the shoulder blade? In our daily lives we use our arms and hands and hardly think of the shoulder blades. Also the moment you put the club in your hands , the arms want to take over. I am consciously trying to move my right shoulder behind my ear ..maybe that is how one activates the blade?
July 30, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Sam. Try not to over complicate the move. You use your blade more in everyday activity than you would think. You should feel like the trail shoulder blade is moving behind the head. Take a look at the Golf Body Rotation Video in the Backswing Section to feel how you should move.
July 31, 2015
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sambhu
Thanks for the quick replies. Great site.
July 31, 2015
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Ray
Please name one accomplished PGA tour player that ever did this. 99% started the takeaway with the famous "triangle". Thanks.
July 28, 2015
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Ray -- I think you are missing the point on just how we teach at RST. You describe in your message as a teaching technique that gave golfers a way to feel their way into a takeaway position. Maintain the triangle and eureka all bad habits are solved. The version that Chuck and the rest of the RST team instruct is how to move your body in a safe and efficient way that will cause the club to react and move in a consistent way every single time. Even though you see players maintaining a "triangle", just as many instructors have taught over the years, it is far more important to understand how to move the body properly to achieve the end result of the "triangle". I encourage you to try and perform the moves as we instruct them and allow us to guide you along the way regardless of what you have heard or what you have been taught in the past. We will do our best to make sure you get to where you want to go with your swing! All the best - Ct
July 29, 2015
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sambhu
Hi, Is is squeezing the right lat( for a right handed golfer) or as simple as moving the right shoulder behind my right ear? Please advice.
July 25, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Sam. Make it simple. Don't try to overly squeeze or pull the trail lat too hard. Turning the shoulder blade behind the trail ear is a good thought.
July 25, 2015
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sambhu
Thanks. I meant right shoulder not blade.
July 25, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Yes, trail shoulder back and behind you.
July 25, 2015
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Jason
on this move, when I practice it, I get the feeling that in order to "leverage" the move via the right shoulder, the right arm is adducted to the pectoral muscles somewhat. is that the correct method. I did watch the shoulder blade glide video and still have the above sensation when doing it the way I think of it.
July 22, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jason. It shouldn't be adducted too much, but the sensation you are getting of keeping a connection between the trail arm, upper pectoral and upper bicep is okay.
July 22, 2015
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Jason
great thx.
July 22, 2015
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John
I'm still struggling with this image of moving my shoulder blade. Obviously it can't move toward the spine, but it can rotate back. Also, the idea of rotating down seems to be a move that would make you come up and out of your spine angle. Am I right in thinking that as you rotate back, the left shoulder should come down and under your chin? If that is so, and the left shoulder (along with its shoulder blade) is moving down and under the chin, then would not my right shoulder have to be moving back towards center, but also in an upward direction. In other words, how can my left shoulder move down unless the right shoulder is moving up? As a corollary, if my right shoulder is moving down and back towards my spine as you are instructing, then would not my right shoulder have to be moving up?
July 21, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello John. The lead shoulder will come down under the chin, but that is because you are maintaining your spine angle and rotating around it. You shouldn't have to force or focus on the lead shoulder going down. The shoulders are staying in the box. The down is an optical illusion not a forced motion. If the trail shoulder moved up the shoulder would shrug and not turn. Take a look at Understanding Shoulder Blade Glide in this Section Advanced.
July 21, 2015
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Jonathan
I was looking for a mirror to do drills in front of in the garage. What size/type of mirror do you recommend . I cant remember what video it was, but one instructor had one with strings across it for alignment stuff and was hoping to be able to do the same. Thanks.
July 17, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jonathan. You can use any size mirror. I actually have 2 giant 9 foot mirrors I work with. No need to get that extravagant unless you want to. Nevertheless, you can find some decent sized mirrors online, bed room dressing mirrors, or we have the 360 Mirror in our training aid store.
July 17, 2015
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David
Hi Craig, is it possible to overdo pulling the right shoulder in the takeaway? Chuck talks like it isn't possible in his videos but for me because I can turn my shoulders almost 90 deg in the takeaway then once I start the backswing it feels very long and disconnected? thanks for the help.
July 16, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello David. You can definitely over do the pull and wrench the blade too much in the takeaway. Don't force too hard of a pull down and in.
July 16, 2015
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David
ok should I be thinking 45 deg shoulder turn to complete the takeaway?
July 16, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello David. Yes, 45 degree shoulder turn and little hip movement.
July 16, 2015
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John
I been practicing this move all summer and it's really helped me get into a great position at the top of my backswing. The only thing I do different is I start to hinge the wrists up has soon as my right hand passes my right thigh. The hinge at that point of the swing feels natural. Should I be waiting till my hands are waist high before I start to hinge? Thanks, John
July 16, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello John. There is wrist set in the takeaway. Roughly 25%. If you wait too long the club won't start to work vertically enough or support the club. Sounds like you are on the right track. The Using the Wrist Efficiently and Effectively Video in the Introduction Advanced Section, 5 Mins to the Perfect Takeaway in the Takeaway Section and the RST Pencil Tee Drill in the Advanced Takeaway Section discuss this.
July 16, 2015
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Maximilian
Hello RST. If I do this motion i get a really flat shoulder turn. Most of the time I`m loosing my spine angle, because my left shoulder touches my chin and that creates a lot of tension in the neck or around. The only way to prevent this, is moving my head around during the rotation. Should the left shoulder feel like falling down in the takeaway? Or is my hip bump in posture not enough?
July 14, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Maximilian. It sounds like you aren't rotating around the spine properly or adding proper elevation. Make sure when you rotate that the blade moves down and in, but it shouldn't cause a levelness in the shoulders. Also, take a look at Understanding Shoulder Elevation in the Backswing Section to keep it from being flat.
July 14, 2015
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Gavin
I have a tough time understanding the 2" move. what starts the shoulder blade glide? Is it a rotation around the spine or a push down with my shoulder blade while stationary...which seems to increase tension and a lack of width. I really like the swing and the coaching, but am not quite consistent with takeaway and would appreciate some insight into this move or feel. Thanks.
July 14, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gavin. Take a look at Understanding Shoulder Blade Glide in this section Advanced. You will start to pull on the trail lat to engage the shoulder blade to move down and in to create a shoulder turn around your spine.
July 14, 2015
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Edward
When you perform the takeaway, does the length of the takeaway until you start the backswing vary from club to club. Say an 8 iron vs. a 3 wood. It seems to me that the takeaway ionger for the longer clubs, but not just because the club is longer.
July 13, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Edward. Describe what you mean by length. The radius will increase, but the move to perform the takeaway is still the same. Only requires a 2 inch movement of the shoulder blade and 45 degrees of rotation.
July 13, 2015
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Edward
When I watch the video it looks like you end the takeaway when the club is parallel to the ground. Am I correct? When I try this, I almost always push the ball to the right. However, when I do the takeaway as shown on the video but end it when my hands are just past my right thigh and then I take the club up into the back swing, I am able to his straight. Am I doing the takeaway incorrectly?
July 11, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Edward. You might be allowing yourself to get a little deep when performing this move. Take a look at the 4 Square Drill in the Advanced Backswing Section and the RST Pencil Tee Drill in the Advanced Takeaway Section to see the exact club positioning and how you might need a little more blend of elevation.
July 12, 2015
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Ryan
I am really trying to work on a great takeaway but I'm getting a little lost on what to feel in the takeaway. The shoulder blade glide should not provide me with much tension right? I feel like using just my obliques doesn't get me to 90 degrees but I know from recent videos my shoulders shouldn't feel very tense. I'm good with the weight shift but need to find the right feeling for the upper body in the takeaway
July 1, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ryan. You want to feel the shoulder blade move, but you definitely don't want to over tense it. In the takeaway, the shoulders will turn roughly 45 degrees. Take a look the 2 inch hand drill in the Role of the Right Arm Video Advanced Takeaway Section. Should give you a good feeling.
July 2, 2015
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Louis
Is it ob to turn off the ball by pulling both the right oblique and the shoulder together. It seems that helps me sequence the downswing better as the hip finds its limit (45 deg closed) before the shoulder does. Otherwise, I have a tendency to keep pulling the shoulder without getting loaded into the right hip (also making me more likely to turn back with all shoulders)
July 3, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Louis. Both the shoulder and oblique need to be engaged. I would rather the pull from the shoulder help you start to pull the oblique. But, if you need to feel a little more activation in the meantime to make sure your torso rotates you can engage both sooner.
July 3, 2015
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Adem
I hit a pretty solid ball but no matter what I do, eg pass the bucket etc I find my takeaway a little too inside. Hands are in a great position. I feel like my right wrist breaks down early therefore bringing the club head behind me slightly in this first position. Any help would be great. Loving RST By the way!
June 29, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Adem. Thanks for the compliments of RST. You need to find the culprit. Whether it is the right or left hand. Take a look at One Simple Takeaway Fix and the Right Wrist in the Takeaway Videos in the Advanced Takeaway Section to diagnose the problem.
June 30, 2015
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Luigi
This video is maybe my "ah!" video! I'm not an engineer, but I got a realy good picture. Thank you.
June 22, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Thanks Luigi. Glad you like the video.
June 23, 2015
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Russel
I have been practicing this takeaway for a few days now and what I notice is that I cannot get the toe of the club to point straight up to the sky without manipulating my wrist or bending my right elbow. The clubhead appears to be just slightly shut but I notice in your videos you keep the clubhead pointing straight towards the sky. Am I setting up incorrectly? or do I have to manipulate my wrists?
June 16, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Russel. You have to allow for some forearm rotation. Take a look at the Using the Wrist Efficiently Video in the Introduction Advanced Section, Unleash Your Thumbnail for Power and RST Pencil Tee Drill in the Advanced Takeaway Section.
June 16, 2015
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Russel
thank you so much craig! that video using the wrist efficiently video cleared up all my confusion. Did not even think to take a look in that section lol.
June 16, 2015
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Connie
3.30
June 8, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Connie. Do you have a question about the video?
June 9, 2015
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Connie
Thank you Shane, I just made that note to mark a good place to start revising the video, but I do have a problem more than a question--I seem to finish with my club pointing down at about 4 o'clock and it feels like my shoulders are limiting the movement. I'm sure it'll work out eventually! Thanks for your interest, Connie
June 9, 2015
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Shane
Hi there, just a quick question related to the takeaway and weight shift. Does the 1 inch shift to the right side that is mentioned in the weight shift videos occur during the start of the takeaway or is it part of the back swing. At the moment I was only rotating my shoulders (right shoulder blade) using my obliques and keeping my hips as square as possible. I wasn't making any conscious shift to the right side at this stage. Hope that makes sense.
June 6, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Shane. The majority of the weight shift in the backswing needs to happen in the takeaway. You can use it as your trigger to start pulling the club back, or blend it in gradually throughout the move.
June 6, 2015
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Loran
The end of the takeaway...the line is in front of the right thigh pocket or more towards the end of the trail pants pocket?
June 5, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Loan. Can you elaborate a little on your question? What line? Thanks.
June 5, 2015
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Loran
Parallel line at the end of the takeaway. I am trying to get an idea for a more accurate location without doubting myself on the golf course.
June 5, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Loan. More towards the end.
June 5, 2015
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Peter
wow - i can't wait to go out and implement this strong but simple back swing tip - BTW thanks to my on-line lesson and following the different improvement video presented by Chuck and his entire staff I hot my best round of the year early this week - 67 off a par 72. Thanks team for all your help - i look forward to scoring more in the very low 70's and many more times in the 60's.
June 5, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Great Peter. That's awesome. Keep up the good swinging and appreciate the compliments of site/staff.
June 5, 2015
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Sebastien
Hi. Feel easier to activate my right glute with starting rotation of my right hips in the same time as right shoulder Turn during takeway. Is it ok to do so or does it prevent separation? Sebastien
May 31, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Sebastien. Preferably, you want the hips being pulled open for torque and biomechanics. Try to allow them to get pulled the best you can.
June 1, 2015
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Stewart
I pull from the right side and try to feel I move my shoulder blade behind my back however I am always inside the line. They only way I can get it in plane is to elevate my arms. Surely that is manipulation of the club. This is where I am having problems as I can not get the elevation/manipulation correct every time. It is hit and miss (or miss). Any advise welcome.
May 30, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Stewart. There is elevation in the takeaway. Also, a little wrist set. Take a look at Understanding Shoulder Elevation in the Backswing Section and the Pencil Tee Drill in the Advanced Takeaway Section.
May 30, 2015
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Paul
In the Related Articles to the takeaway, there is mention of the Rotary Hitter Golf Swing Takeaway and the Rotary Swing Takeaway. Trying to sort out which applies to me. In the past I've naturally used more of a Rotary Swing Takeaway method with success. When I became a Rotary Swing member I started using the Rotary Hitter Takeaway method (been 2 months). Which is more suitable for me? I seem to be stuck somewhere in between and my rising handicap and inconsistency reflects my current state of confusion.
May 28, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Paul. The toe up position and the hands inline with the base of the trail pocket when the club is parallel to the ground will be more advantageous to you.
May 28, 2015
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Ray
My only move was to take it back with the right shoulder and hit half 56's and the first shot was flushed 90 yds! After a double take and hitting a dozen more right in the center of the face (new Vokey raw blacks) I began to hinge the right wrist and cannot believe the results. After spending over $5,000 on lessons with the world's then #1 teachers, I have learned more watching videos for 3 days than I did with the others in over 25 years. Friggin' amazing! Thanks for the hard work and more importantly, spending the time to make each move concise and easy to understand. I know I can shoot 74 again thanks to you guys. Thanks!!
May 23, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Ray. Fantastic. We appreciate the post and compliments. Keep making that swing better. Scores will keep coming down with some good ole' fashioned work.
May 23, 2015
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Matthew
If we don't have 25% of our wrist cock by end of takeaway and even slightly lose some wrist cock, that would generally get the butt of the club pointing well outside the ball and a really flat backswing plane right? This would make it very hard timing wise to get back on plane and play consistent golf? Could this be caused by too quick of a tempo or possibly by 130g shafted clubs that are still a d3 to d5 swingweight?
May 18, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Matthew. You need the wrist cock not only for the vertical motion in the swing, but also for leverage. Quick tempo can easily lead to inside flat backswing plane. Engage the big muscles and take your time.
May 19, 2015
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Lee
Quick follow up, what initiates the takeaway, is it the pulling back of the right shoulder, if so, it feels weird for this to initiate things.
May 17, 2015
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Lee, you can initiate the swing by pressing your right heel into the ground, which moves the club about 6 inches before you start rotating. I find this to be the least hindering trigger for those who feel the need to have one. R.J.
May 17, 2015
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Lee
I am struggling a lot with my club going back outside the target line on the takeaway. I am working hard to feel like the left arms is passive. The times I can do it I have to make a small arc on the ground during the takeaway, though this results in a "low takeaway". Even though I feel like my left is dead, does an outside swing path on the takeaway indicate that I must be pushing with the left?
May 17, 2015
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Lee, if you push across with the left arm, you'll be inside/underneath the plane, however, if you elevate your arms too soon, then you'll be outside/above the plane. Good luck on your improvement!
May 17, 2015
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greg
Thanks, R.J.! Chuck talks about rotating the left elbow at impact & have it pointing to the target. Why can't I point it at the target at address & kept there? Thanks!
May 5, 2015
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Greg, if you don't externally rotate the arm after impact you won't be able to release the club fully. R.J.
May 5, 2015
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greg
That's my question, R.J. Why not start with the left elbow externally rotated at address??? Thanks!
May 5, 2015
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Greg, great question! The reason that you want your elbow to point down the target line at impact is two fold. One, the elbow is a hinge joint. It is meant only to flex the upper and lower arm together. When the elbow is pointing down the target line, the force of the club head hitting the ground will cause the elbow to bend slightly. If the arm is externally rotated, the shock of the club hitting the ground will cause the elbow to bend laterally. Which is bad news bears for the joint. Secondly, the wrist would have a very hard time staying flat at impact and pointing down the target line if the arm was externally rotated. R.J.
May 6, 2015
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greg
Can someone please answer my question from May 3rd, Below? Thanks!
May 4, 2015
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Greg, I got you covered =), R.J.
May 5, 2015
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GARY
Hi, is there a video that discusses the transition from takeaway to completing the backswing?
May 4, 2015
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Gary, it isn't a transition as much as it is a continuation. You want to continue rotating and elevating the arms. That will get you to the point where you can work on the right elbow flexion videos for the backswing. R.J.
May 5, 2015
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greg
Do you have a video of the "Lawnmower" drill with the right arm that Chuck is talking about? Can you explain it in more detail? Thanks!
May 3, 2015
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Greg, pulling the cord on a lawnmower to get it started is the last thing that you'd want to relate to your takeaway. In the takeaway we're trying to prevent the elbow from flexing. If you concentrate on the shoulder blade movements with your elbow pits pointing away from your body, you'll succeed in the takeaway. R.J.
May 5, 2015
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Gavin
Hi. I struggle to consistently take the club back on the original shaft plane. if its not through the plane (when I draw a line on club), the shaft tends to work above. the club does get to hip height parallel to target, but because of the higher than desired take away, the club works more behind me at top of swing. from there I can get it down and back on line at impact, but the club is working from the outside. Not from the inside (slightly) as is with most tour pros. I have spent literally months trying to perfect this (while playing some good golf), trying to engage shoulder blade, rotate round spine, have passive arms, make a pure turn, but I revert back to above plane take-away. I would almost prefer a slightly under plane take away to this as I could rotate harder though the ball, rather than swing with arms from top. appreciate any input.
April 21, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gavin. The plane for the takeaway won't be perfectly inline with the club due to elevation. Understanding Shoulder Elevation in the Backswing Section. Take a look at Proper Swing Plane in the Introduction Advanced Section. See how well you match that line. If you are slightly above it in the takeaway. All is ok.
April 21, 2015
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David
Now if I could only learn to type on an iPad without so many mistakes !
April 19, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
No worries David. Everyone struggles with IPad typing.
April 20, 2015
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David
Dave Reid here. I've been studing you videos for four days. I started on Thursday with the videos and spent an hour at the range after work. I played on Friday afternoon and attempted to use your rotary swing. I was so successful that my playing partner, Manny Ngoh, wanted to know what happened so I directed him to your site. He is now studing your teachings and we are planning a tr to Atlanta from Augusta soon. Now to my point... As a freshman mechanical student years ago my advisor and Dean of Engineering, Dr Whitfield, made a statement in our first class that I've never forgotten. "All you have to remember to be a great engineer is F= MA and you can't push on a rope" Fast forward a few years and I'm a dentist. Having studed anatomy and physiology I was aware that the same engineering principle applies to the body skeletal structure. A muscle is a rope. There are no muscles that push. All actions by muscles on the skeletal structure are pulls. In the video talking about push vs pull the light came on that It's impossible to push any movement in the golf swing! When we think we start our takeaway or any other golf move by pushing the club we are actually pulling the club with some set of small muscles instead of the big muscles! I know well after years of doing just this how ineffective and tiring this is! Your method of using the larger muscles in the box to pull is outstanding! Not only can I practice long periods without getting tired, since I've been using your method practicing and doing drills I have slept soundly through the night and awoke without backpain for the first time in years! I'm as excited about this as I am about the improvement in my game! The only downside of this is I may no longer be seeing my chiropractor every two weeksto get out of pain! My only regret is that I'm 64 years old and just now learning this. Thank you in many ways, Dave.
April 19, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dave. Thank you for the post. We appreciate the positive notes and story of your current RST Journey. Never too old to start learning. The more you stay with the program the better your body will feel. I would please ask that you don't tell your Chiropractor about us for fear of retribution . I look forward to working with Manny this week. Keep "pulling" and good things will happen.
April 20, 2015
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Andrew
Hey RST team, quick question for you. When should you start incorporating the weight shift into the takeaway?
April 19, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Andrew. The weight shift is gradual throughout the takeaway. However, some players have a hard time blending this move. You are more than welcome to use it as your trigger to start the swing. Shift into the trail side and start rotating back.
April 19, 2015
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BRIAN
Have been practicing the RST takeaway for some time and its fine without the ball. With the ball however the right hand wants to hold the face square on takeaway and the right elbow pops out. This results in a closed face at impact and a pull or smother - Suggestions please. It seems to help with an early rotation of hands. Should I take the club back straight and then rotate or rotate immediately?
April 13, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Brian. Take a look at the RST Pencil Tee Drill in the Advanced Takeaway Section and the Using the Wrist Efficiently Video in the Introduction Advanced Section. The club rotates very gradually. If you are relaxed and using the shoulder blade glide properly. The arms/hands will add just a bit of rotation to the club to not fight its design.
April 13, 2015
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Matthew
Checked in set up section and take away section but did not see how the arms should bet set at address and during the take away. Should the lead arm sit ON my chest? Do my arms stay pressed against my sides? How "attached" should I be from set up, through take away, into the backswing? Sorry for so many questions.
April 12, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Matthew. Take a look at the Golf Grip and Being Out of the Box Video in the Setup Advanced Section. The arms will just rest on the chest. You don't want to overly press them against your side and/or try to glue them to the body. They should be attached enough the you are aware that your arms are in front at setup and will tend to leave the body a little in the takeaway and backswing. Take a look at Understanding Arm Elevation in the Advanced Backswing Section. They will leave, but not fly away.
April 12, 2015
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Greg
Do you advocate toe up at takeaway or does it match torso tilt?
April 11, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Greg. The toe will be facing up at the end of the takeaway. Take a look at the Unleash Your Thumbnail for Power Video in the Advanced Takeaway Section.
April 12, 2015
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Jason
Hello Folks!! My back swing has never looked this good since practicing the Take away, shoulder blade glide, role of the right arm & right elbow pit (drills). However; In self analysis I'm noticing my head raising right from the start of the take away and by the top of the swing, from down the line view… if I was to draw a line on the top of my head then you'll see half my ear above the line. I don't seem to see any of the RST instructors do this!! Can you please recommend a video? I can't find one that addresses an issue like this. Thank you for your time
March 31, 2015
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Peter
Hi Jason, I had this very same problem for awhile too. In my case, the source of the problem turned out to be too flat of a backswing shoulder turn. This caused my left shoulder to push up on my chin, which in turn could only cause my head to raise in the backswing. Turning my shoulders more perpendicular to the spine angle at address resolved the problem right away, as any RST instructor would no doubt also say. However, what is perhaps more interesting is what brought on my flat shoulder turn in the first place. For me, it was caused by my (mis?)interpretation of the "down and in" language associated with the RST shoulder-blade glide instructions. The "in" part was fine -- that meant in toward the spine. My problem was with the "down" part, which I initially took to mean perpendicular to the ground. Taking that instruction literally led directly to my overly-flat backswing. To appreciate how this could happen, just bend over 90 degrees from your hips and then turn your shoulders perpendicular to your spine (right shoulder up, left shoulder down). What happens is that your right shoulder goes up in relation to the ground but your right shoulder blade goes down -- not toward the ground, mind you, but toward your spine. Now, when taking your slightly-bent-over golf stance, think "down toward your spine (not toward the ground) and in toward your spine" for that shoulder-blade glide. I found this alternative swing thought to be very much in tune what I think Chuck Q is actually advocating in his shoulder-blade glide video. In summary, I ultimately located the source of my earlier head-raising problem to what I think was my own initial misinterpretation of what the intended video instruction was actually saying. Chuck or any other RST instructor should feel free to correct me if I'm wrong on this point, either semantically or biomechanically. The last thing I'd want to do is mislead you about this critical takeaway move. Instead, I hope my analysis helps you to resolve your problem. Cheers, Pete Dahl RST Premium Member Kent, Ohio
August 5, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jason. Check your lower body. Take a look at Perfecting Lower Body Stability in the Weight Shift Advanced Section. Your base is probably moving around too much and not maintaining weight balance and knee flexion.
March 31, 2015
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jude
Club take away, Are my correct to say that it seems like my right arm is in control of the club take away and doesn't it seem like the club is too inside when i do that? please advise. Jude
March 28, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jude. Both arms have a job to do in the swing. However, if that right side and arm are under control going back. It will help keep the club from going inside early.
March 28, 2015
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Ryan
During my takeaway and backswing, my head moves down and out towards the ball. This obviously is bad but what causes it and what's the best way to work on fixing it?
March 13, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ryan. Shifting the weight back to the balls of the feet and/or tilting the shoulders can affect your head position. Use the Bucket Drill in this Section to help with the shoulder tilt. Take a look at the Weight on the Balls of the Feet in the Setup Advanced Section to understand more about stability.
March 13, 2015
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Francis
Since some turning of the hips is inevitable when you turn your shoulders, do you have ane cues or signal s tha the hips have turnef too much?
March 11, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Francis. If your trail leg starts to straighten early and/or you lose the feeling of torque (coiling the upper half against the lower half). The hips will more than likely be rotating too much.
March 11, 2015
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Karen
Hi, I have been working quite religiously on the takeaway, the bucket drill, pencil drill. Today I went to the indoor range (where you go when there is 4' of snow) and I see good improvement. I have also started working on the 9 to 3. I seem to have two primary issues: 1/ 9 to 3 is crisp. In full swing I am hitting behind ball; and 2/ I seem to be coming up at impact rather than staying down and through. Any suggested videos/drills to keep me down through impact?
March 8, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Karen. Take a look at the Taking a Divot Video in the Advanced Downswing Section. It will help you with staying down and hitting the ground at the proper time.
March 9, 2015
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Karen
Thanks. I will take a look. Re-watching my own video I can see my shoulders aren't level through the downswing and my hands are way ahead of the ball. I am 'sliding' my weight forward instead of turning or rotating back and through. I don't want to get ahead of myself here but I have some downswing problems it seems.
March 10, 2015
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Sean
March 10, 2015
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Seth
I was always taught that when the club is parallel to the ground in the take-away, the face should be parallel with the spine. RST teaches that the face should be perpendicular to the ground. Can you elaborate on why the difference in recommended face angles at that given position with maybe a pro/con of each?
March 3, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Seth. The face always needs to be rotating. When you keep the face shut (matching the spine angle) you will have to manipulate at some point to get to the correct position at the top. We have a few great videos discussing the pros/cons. Unleash Your Thumbnail for Power in the Advanced Takeaway Section and the Using the Wrists Efficiently Video in the Introduction Advanced Section.
March 3, 2015
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Seth
Okay. Thank you. It's funny how I always questioned some of the ways I was taught. And your way just seems to make so much more sense.
March 3, 2015
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Karen
Hi, I have, perhaps, a dumb question but I really want to understand what I am doing. I am working on the pencil drill as part of my homework. It is helping quite a bit as prior to this, I believe I was coming inside right off the bat. My question is whether that coming inside right off the bat would have been causing me to hit my irons left (as in straight left, not slicing). I am a left handed golfer.
March 2, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Karen. Coming inside on the takeaway can easily lead to a left straight push. If you get inside and behind going back. Returning on the same plane without a properly squared face can easily push the ball left.
March 3, 2015
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John
Hi, I think there a few of us confused with the down part of the takeaway, to understand better the only way I can get the down portion right is if the right shoulder works higher and the left shoulder works more down in the take away. Is this correct or do you want the shoulders turning more level?
February 18, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello John. The shoulders will be turing more level. The only reason for the left working below the right is the spine angle at address. Don't over complicate it too much. Its a blade glides down and in across the rib cage. A small movement. Take a look at Understanding Shoulder Blade Glide in the Takeaway Advanced Section.
February 18, 2015
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Elliot
I am having a hard time feeling the "down" portion of move 1 that Chuck describes as "2 inches behind and down." What is the purpose of this down feeling? When I attempt to feel both "behind and down" it feels as if my left shoulder is moving up in response.
February 17, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Elliot. The down portion is very small. It is referring to how the blade actually glides across the rib cage. The purpose is to keep the shoulder blade in the box and engage it with the core muscles. If your trail shoulder is moving up in response you might be wrenching it down in excess.
February 17, 2015
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Jay
After Move 1, I have a nasty backswing that points way outside the target line from DTL view. Is it ok for me to cup my left wrist so I cock my wrist more vertical? I know the downside is a shut face during move #1.
February 8, 2015
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Jay, ideally, we don't want to add compensations to our swing. If your takeaway is currently good on camera, we wouldn't want to alter that in order to get to a certain position at the top. It would be easier to work on Move 2 some more with various drills until we get your backswing ironed out. I would recommend having a swing review specialist take a look at your backswing to see what would need to be done to go from a good move 1 position to a great move 2 position. Cupping the lead wrist at the top of the swing is going to make it very difficult to release the club properly and deloft the club at impact. R.J.
February 8, 2015
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Jay
R.J. I don't cup my wrist at the top, somehow it flattens out by itself. I only cup until move 1 stops and move 2 starts. I submitted my review just now. Thanks.
February 8, 2015
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Jay, certainly! The pulling of lead arm across the body by the flexion of the trailing arm will naturally flatten the wrist, unless we consciously attempt to cup it at the top. R.J.
February 9, 2015
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sandeep
HI, I'm trying very hard to start the takeaway with the shoulder blade glide. I'm ok with the 'in' part but struggle with the 'down' part of the shoulder blade movement. Is there any other way or thought that I could use to start the rotation of the torso in the backswing?
February 8, 2015
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Sandeep, when we're pulling the shoulder back, if we focus on keeping our trail side shoulder as far from our trail side ear as we can, without moving our head, it will take care of the down portion of the shoulder blade glide. Also, check your axis tilt. If your axis is tilting towards the target line, it will be very difficult to get the shoulder blade to move down. If our muscles are tense, it makes it harder to rotate so, you might actually be trying too hard. Please, check out the bucket drill and the necktie drill. R.J.
February 8, 2015
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Mike
To get the club to the right position at the end of the takeaway it is 90 degrees from the starting point. I am having a difficult time understanding how the butt of the club can staying pointing at the chest when it travels 45 degrees more than the chest. Is the club always turning at a higher rate than the chest? Is there a certain point in the takeaway where the club starts to turn at a higher rate than the chest?
February 7, 2015
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Mike, by time the takeaway is finished, we'll have the butt of the club pointing down the target line. We want to keep our hands and arms in front of our sternum, but the hinge and cocking of the wrists will set the club so that it's both parallel to the target line and the ground. Craig Morrow's pencil drill is a great way to drill getting yourself in this position. If you have a camera pointing directly down the target line at waist high, your club head will cover up your hands. R.J.
February 8, 2015
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Bob
When do I send in my second video of my swing for the February 4 th review
January 26, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Bob. Swings are able to be uploaded every 2 weeks per premium membership. If you need any help or assistance. Please let us know.
January 28, 2015
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Mike
What is the best way to start the backswing? What is a good trigger or thought to get the swing started from the very start?
January 25, 2015
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Mike, Shifting your weight into your right heel will move the club head about six inches without getting any weird jerks or twitches from the upper body. I find it be a very effective trigger. Then just start your takeaway after that by pulling your right shoulder blade down and in towards your spine, which rotates the torso. R.J.
January 26, 2015
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Nick
I could use some clarification here. I'm a bit confused with the position at the club at the end of the takeaway. In the video, Chuck states the shoulder turn about 45 degrees. However, the club is oriented 90 degrees from the starting position. From what I can understand, the club should stay centered on your body with the butt of the club pointed at your spine. Where do the extra 45 degrees come from?
January 22, 2015
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Steven (Certified RST Instructor)
Nick, At the end of move 1 we want about 25% of wrist set to occur. which means the butt end of the club will no longer be pointing at your spine. We don't want to keep the butt of the club pointing at our spine because then there would be very little wrist set. With that being said we can keep the club in front of our body by keeping the right arm straight and with a pulling motion from the trail shoulder. That little wrist set is where that extra "elevation or lift" of the club is coming from which will get the club parallel to the ground. steven
January 22, 2015
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Nick
Thanks Steven. Maybe I'm still misunderstanding but im not concerned with the club becoming parallel to the ground. I'm concerned with the club getting parallel to my target line. In other words, if the target is north, and at address I'm facing east, when my shoulders turn 45 degrees to face southeast (my sternum points southeast), how does the club end up pointing south (ie parallel to my toe line)? Thanks again.
January 23, 2015
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Nick
I could really use some feedback to the question above. Thanks.
January 28, 2015
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Nick, There's a slight cocking and cupping of the right wrist at the end of the takeaway that get the toe pointing up and the club parallel to the target line and parallel to the ground. The hands stay in front of the sternum, but the club head does not. I hope this clears things up for you. R.J.
January 29, 2015
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Donal
I've just watched my takeaway alongside chucks and realised I seem to be upcocking my wrists almost immediately which seems to cause my club to reach parallel too quickly and my backswing to get very steep. Should this wrist movement only happen at the top of the backswing? Thanks
January 13, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
25 % of the wrist set is in the takeaway. Because you are roughly 25 % done with the golf swing. Take a look at the 5 Minutes the the Perfect Takeaway in this section for more detail. Also, the Using the Wrist Efficiently Video in the Introduction Advanced Section.
January 14, 2015
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Robert
So I understand the sequencing; a) shoulder blade 2" towards the spine b) right hip 1" to the right c)load the right glute then d) complete the backswing using what's in the backswing videos ? thanks
January 13, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Robert. 2 " Shoulder Glide, 1 inch shift into the trail glute, a touch of elevation and wrist set for Move 1. Continue to pull from the shoulder blade as you add a little shoulder elevation, flexion, and external humeral with the trail arm.
January 14, 2015
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Doyle
Hi - In the 9 to 3 drill, do I engage the Lats during rotation or just turn my shoulder? Doyle
January 11, 2015
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Doyle, Engage your obliques and lats leading into impact. Think of the 9 to 3 drill as a full golf swing drawn on a chalkboard then taking an eraser and wiping out everything above the waist. I can tell that you're going to succeed with your hard work! Keep it up! R.J.
January 12, 2015
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Darren
Hi when doing takeaway drills and practice swings my hips rotate slightly knees pointing forward result perfect position at top, when hitting a ball i can see much more of left leg from down the line my right leg doesnt straighten but i can now rotate too much...result across the line at top but still upper body connected, any tips on stopping this from happening? should i over exagerate and feel like im cemented into floor? try 1 legged swings? any drills you could suggest please
January 11, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Darren. Take a look a the the Left Knee Laser Beam Drill in the Advanced Backswing Section. Keep the left a little more stable to help the right. Also, take a look at the Overswinging Video in the same section. Check the trail arm positioning with the across the line issue. If they work to no avail watch the Weight Shift Video Part 2 in the Weight Shift Section. Make sure you are pivoting into the trail glute properly and allowing for correct hip turn.
January 11, 2015
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gordon
I have just had a 2 hour session on the driving range and my right knee feels a little "wobbly". This knee is carrying an old injury, but I am wondering if the cause of my current sensitivity is a fautly take away. Can you please clarify for me which bones and muscles should be involved (and felt) in the take away. In particular stabilising the righthand side. Could it be that my knee is being unduly loaded as a result of my bad habit of shifting my weight forward onto the balls of my feet at the start of the takeaway? Should the weight shift onto the right heel be activating the glute instead of stressing my knee? Thanks in advance, Gordon.
January 7, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gordon. In the takeaway, the weight needs to shift into the right heel/right glute. If it moves forward you will be stressing out the knee joint. Right heel/glute. Take a look at the Weight Shift Video Part 1 and 2 in the Weight Shift Section.
January 8, 2015
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Doyle
Hi I'm a bit confused about the takeaway. RST promotes a straight right arm until you start to go up in the backswing from the takeaway as I understand. I have also been reading Hogan"s book and he definately has a soft and somewhat bent right arm at the top of the takeaway. Please tell me the benefits of keeping the right arm straight until you begin to follow through from the takeaway into the backswing. Doyle
January 1, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Doyle. It is ok for the right arm to be soft in the takeaway, but you don't want it bending too early. The right arm remaining straight allows you to keep the trail shoulder engaged. If the right arm folds early it is very easy to have more of a arms/hands dominated backswing because momentum will take over and the bigger muscles will become disengaged. Keeping the right arm straighter longer allows for a lot of width early on which is needed for a nice wide arc. Therefore, creating a position to create better lag from on the downswing. Take a look at the Wide-Narrow Wide in the Advanced Introduction Section and the Role of the Right Arm in the Advanced Takeaway Section for more information.
January 2, 2015
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William
Uploading another video tomorrow (31/12/14) and reckon things are looking better, but still not right. My ball-striking has improved beyond belief, with another golfer a couple of bays away commenting on the 'sound' of my strikes - this can only be good - but why is this first move in the swing proving to be so difficult for me? Guess I'll just keep working away...
December 30, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
William, All you're doing in the takeaway is... Shifting your weight into the right heel by pulling the body over with the right groin, glute and hip muscles. Keeping the arms straight Pulling your shoulder blade down and in towards your spine a couple inches with the lower traps, rhomboid (feels like lat) from the right side That's all you have to do and it's a perfect takeaway each time. There are some small details like a slight wrist cock, arm elevation and forearm rotation, but if you focus on the 3 points above, you can't go too wrong. It's likely that you're over complicating it. R.J.
December 31, 2014
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Darren
Hi I feel confident know doing this drill and also with the club and elevation just wondering next move as I can't turn much more is it then just a fold of right arm to complete back swing? I feel I am turning and then elevating but my right elbow comes away slightly
December 23, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Darren. Take a look at the 3 Functions of the Right Arm in the Advanced Downswing Section and the Move 2 Video in the Backswing Section. You will continue to rotate and start to support the plane with the trail arm. As you elevate it will be easier to rotate a little more.
December 23, 2014
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sajid
Hi R.J, I needed to clarify these things as RS teaching methods contradicts most of the other teaching methods out there and what the Tour players are doing. Thanks. Really appreciate!!
December 3, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Sajid, Exactly! Tour pros have essentially been using the same swings and golf pros have been teaching the same things for 100 years and golfer's handicaps haven't gotten any better despite golf equipment getting significantly better. RST isn't based on swing theories or comparing swing between golf pros of the past, like all golf instruction has been. Rotary swing tour isn't just a swing model, it's the science of the golf swing. Every piece of the swing is broken down to the fundamentals of the swing. All the way down to how to produce a certain action by moving certain muscles. This video perfectly explains how to get the club into the same exact place every time, which happens to be the exact place we need the club to be at the end of our take away to produce the best golf swing possible. According to Albert Einstein, the other teachers of golf and pros are all insane because Einstein defined insanity as "doing the same thing over any over and expecting different results". The RST program dares to be different, not because it wants to be different, but because it's the right way to do it. It's the most efficient and safe way to produce a golf swing. R.J.
December 4, 2014
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sajid
Hi R.J, What about the famous Ben Hogan "waggle". As mentioned below: "What it amounts to is that you address the ball with some movement, or waggle as the tournament professionals call it, and then go smoothly from the waggle into the backswing via the recoil from the forward press.” Power Golf, page 33. Tour players do it all the time especially the likes of Sergio Garcia earning himself the nickname "El waggle " and "waggle boy". Your comment. thanks
December 2, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Sajid, We discourage any forward movement of body parts until the transition between the backswing and the downswing. Any move opposite of the goal movement will produce a need for a compensation and we want to eliminate as many extra movements as possible to foster consistency or repeatability. What you do before you address the ball is up to you, but you would want to come to rest, regardless for how briefly, prior to starting your takeaway. Any of the bad habits that the pros get into is because they practice 8-10 hours a day on their game and they've had a lot of time burning these movements into their brain and the compensations into their brain in order to be able to repeat the swing. Most of us don't have that kind of time to practice in order to overcome extra movements with compensations. The less you need to learn, the better you're going to be so, it's always best to keep it simple and use the least amount of moment to get from point A to point B in the swing. R.J.
December 2, 2014
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Dean
I can do all the drills to try and perfect this for nearly 3 weeks. But once i put the club in my hand with the weight of it at the end as normal im hopeless my left arm takes over and swings it across my body. Im due fir anither review but whats the point if im still doing the same thing
December 2, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Dean, When you have the club in your hand and you're trying to do the drill. Close your eyes and try to focus on the specific muscles in your back that pulls the shoulder and don't think about the club at all. Then see where your club winds up when you open your eyes. Once you can do this properly, then keep your eyes open and focus on those same muscles. You should be able to get over the weight of the club and the psyche of trying to get the club to do what you want it to do. Remember, your club does what your hands do, your hands do what your arms do and your arms do what your core does. So, if you move the core properly, the rest will follow so really focus on that musculature movement at first and forget the club is in your hands. R.J.
December 2, 2014
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sajid
Hi Chuck, I have seen Henrik Stenson and many other tour players press the club forward with their wrists before takeaway. If its just the shoulder turn in takeaway, when will the wrists come into action which is important for effortless power. thanks.
December 1, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Sajid, We discourage any forward motion prior to the initiation of the downswing. We teach the golf swing to be as efficient as possible, removing all extra, unnecessary moves in the swing in order to limit mistakes and prevent injury. By the end of the takeaway, there should be a small amount of arm elevation, wrist cock and forearm rotation in order to get the shaft of your club parallel to the ground and the target line and to get your club face perpendicular to the ground. So, to answer your question, the wrist action begins at the end of the takeaway and finishes just after impact. R.J.
December 1, 2014
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Muhammed
Hi, I noticed that my head dips towards the ball during the takeway. Is this a bad thing? Any drills to stop this? Thank
November 24, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Muhammed -- This sort of issue can be directly attributed to lower body stability and not rotating around your axis (spine) properly. Make sure that you have a very solid foundation with the weight in true balance (under the ankles) and then work on 5 minutes to master rotation. Start without a club at first and check to see that you are loading and rotating properly without the downward head movement. Then gradually add the club back to the mix. Keep us posted if you need any further help and we will gladly assist you. Good luck.
November 25, 2014
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scott
I seem to struggle with moving my right shoulder back, in the mirror it appears my right shoulder does not move down. At best level but mostly slight rise in right shoulder in start of rotation.
November 22, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Scott, With your spine angle being tilted towards the ball, you're not going to get your shoulder to go down without dislocating your shoulder. Getting your shoulder level to the ground when you're tilted forward is getting your shoulder down. Just focus on keeping your right shoulder as far away from your right ear as possible without moving your head and you do that by pulling the shoulder blade towards the spine with your lower traps, rhomboid and lat muscles R.J.
November 22, 2014
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Sharon
Good question, Mark! i also would like more information on the action of the wrist hinging.....
November 21, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Please refer to my response to Mark =)
November 21, 2014
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Mark
Should any cupping of the left wrist at address remain during the takeaway and backswing?
November 21, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Mark, Yes, you want to maintain those angles until the right elbow flexion pulls your left wrist flat as the arm pulls across the body. Those angles help you keep your hands in front of the sternum R.J.
November 21, 2014
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Dan
Hey RJ. Is there a bit of wrist hinge straight up in the take away? It seems If I add just a touch of wrist hinge with the shoulder elevation in the take away I get to the correct position more naturally.
November 21, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Dan, Yes, there is a slight amount of upward wrist movement at the end of the takeaway to get the club parallel to the ground and target line. We call this movement wrist cocking. Cocking is the up and down movement, like that of swinging a hammer. Hinging would be side to side movement, a slapping like movement. So, we want cocking up, not hinging, but aside from the terminology, you are 100% correct. I just wanted to get that straightened out for you so that you wouldn't get confused going forward. R.J.
November 21, 2014
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Stephen
when during the takeaway is a good time to shift your weight to the right? is it ok to do it at the beginning (as you perform the shoulder glide)
November 20, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Stephen, Personally, I like to shift my weight first to act as a trigger for my swing but as long as it is transferred before the end of the takeaway, it is golden. You can even start with your weight in your right heel at the beginning of your stance if you want as long as the rest of your setup is still perfect. R.J.
November 20, 2014
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William
Finding the rotation with elevation a tad tricky, but I'll keep working on it 'til I get the correct feel - but everything so far is really making sense. I truly believe some golf 'instruction' from the past has a lot to answer for!!!
November 20, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
William, You're right. Science makes a much better argument for a swing style, doesn't it? R.J.
November 20, 2014
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Dean
I can see myself doing it correctly in the mirror with no club. And yes you are right when i have the weight of the club my shoulders don't turn. The correct feeling when i do it correctly is like my right shoulder blade turns in as suggested but my left arm is not actually turning in much at all, it almost feels like its pushing out to get it down the line as my right shoulder blade turns in and down. Does that sound sort of correct?
November 20, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Dean, Yes, that does sound correct. As the right arm folds upwards during the top of the backswing, then you'll feel your left arm being pulled by the right arm across the body. Aside from that, it should almost feel like your right arm is doing all of the work. R.J.
November 20, 2014
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Dean
I can do all the drills, but nearly find this impossible to do with a club. I nearly always put the club in that position with no turn.
November 20, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Dean, In some of the videos it is suggested to flip the club around and grab it from the club head side to do the drills that way before trying to do the drill with the club in the normal position. What this does is take some of the weight away from the club (not actual weight, but perceived weight) making it easier to go through the motions of the drills. After you do that for awhile and you master it with the club flipped around. Then do them normally and see how it works out. Good luck on your progress! R.J.
November 20, 2014
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Jarod
Been a pull hooker for about a year now, played my first round of golf today since joining last week. Just by working on the takeaway, right shoulder back and down, resisting with hips I didn't always make great contact, but hit it straighter than I've done for ages - still got that early extension, but terrific results in just a week!
November 19, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Jarod, Nice work! Keep working at it. Now keep in mind, if the results aren't there before you master the program, don't get discouraged. Some times we need to get worse before we get better. R.J.
November 20, 2014
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Rick
Hi Chuck - In watching the weight shift (to the right) and takeaway videos I'm not sure as to the timing of each. Does the weight shift happen before or after the slight movement of the right shoulder blade or are they simultaneous movements? Thank you
November 18, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Rick, Shifting the weight into right heel first to act as a trigger for your swing will help you to prevent any adverse trigger moves and will take some of the pressure off of you while standing over the ball. R.J.
November 18, 2014
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Rick
Thanks R.J.
November 19, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Rick, You're welcome. R.J.
November 19, 2014
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Dean
Looks foolproof once ingrained. I see many pros do an arm and wrist waggle to loosen up before they swing. How can they possibly make a one piece takeaway with that wrist waggle, wouldn't it promote an early wrist cock in the takeaway?
November 18, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Dean, Although it might be very brief, they rest at the original setup just before doing their takeaway so, the waggle is just a pre-shot routine that they do on every shot to try to foster consistency. So, if you come to rest at the proper setup position prior to starting move 1, you can do anything you want to make yourself feel comfortable. Also, pros practice hours upon hours today so they can ingrain motions into their swing and build compensations in while still being able to get into the proper impact positions. It's not ideal, but it works for them. R.J.
November 18, 2014
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Dan
I noticed in the takeaway my hips are moving too soon (not being pulled back by rotation of torso) and I'm not creating as much separation. What is the best way to change that? I've been doing that most of my golfing life because I think it felt more powerful. I'm sure the answer is to "drill the hell out of it", but any other ideas would be appreciated. Thanks.
November 16, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Dan, Make sure that your knees don't move laterally and your weight is in your heels so that you're activating your glutes and hammys. If your glutes are activated, the hips will be stalled. Let us know if that works for you, R.J.
November 16, 2014
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Dan
How far back should the torso rotation bring the hands before you start shoulder elevation? I feel like the club is being taken too far outside on the way back.
November 7, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Dan, If you're someone who normally took the club inside in the takeaway, you're going to feel like you're going outside of the plane line going back even when you're still slightly inside of it. It's naturally to feel like you're going outside of it. If you draw an elbow plane line in your self analysis on the site, you'll be able to confirm If you really are getting outside. However, to answer your question. If you start the swing off by pushing your right heel into the ground without moving anything else in your body, the club head is going to pull about 6 inches away from the ball. At that point you would want to start rotating and elevating until your hands are about pocket/belt high and the club is parallel to the ground and the target line. If you can do all of that while keeping your hands in front of your body, the right arm straight and the right elbow pit facing towards the sky, you have no choice but to have a perfect takeaway. R.J.
November 7, 2014
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Termaine
Is it normal to have back pain when practicing (lower and right mid back, and cervical spine) the takeaway? I was trying to do my hundred reps a day (this move only) and I had pain. I had to stop for 2 days and not touch a club. I've never had back pain before (unless I practice putting a long time). I'm not reverse pivoting (i use a tie to check) and my left knee isnt caving in, so whats causing the pain? I'm thinking because I'm using my right shoulder to turn combined with the extra reps is the culprit. Any tips, suggestions? I want to continue the program, but not at the expense of my back.
November 5, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Troy. You might not be shifting the weight correctly or allowing for support on the trail side. Take a look at the Weight Shift Video Part 2 in the Weigh Shift Section. It should help alleviate some of the pressure.
November 5, 2014
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Termaine
Thanks I'll do that. I think i was trying to keep my lower body completely still until the end of the takeaway. I think i was restricting my hips too much. I'll rewatch the video. Thanks.
November 6, 2014
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James
I can execute this perfectly in the mirror or on my practice swing but as soon as I do my swing, I'm inside and under the elbow plane line. Any advice? Because from there, I get across the line at the top and then compensation city on the downswing and causing me to have release issues?
November 1, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
James, Instead of going from doing it slowly in the mirror, straight into a full swing, gradually work your way up to a full swing. Start out doing the takeaway at about 25% speed, if you can master the takeaway then, move it up to 50% speed and go a couple inches past a complete takeaway, if you're still on plane then, move it up to 75% speed and go about a foot past the finish of the takeaway, still on plane? Go 100% speed and go all the way up to the top of your swing. Are you still on plane? Then go to the top of your swing, then shift your weight and stop. Check yourself out. If you still look good, go to the top then squat into the left side while feeling like your left your arms up in their top of the backswing position (they will be naturally pulled down by the pulling of the lats and obliques, but feel like you're leaving up in the top of the backswing position), if that works. Then go up to the top, pull your hips square and then bring your arms down in front of your thigh. If everything checks out there, do the full swing and stop at impact. And finally, if it looks good there, do a full swing. Gradually up the ante as you perfect sections of the swing. But don't try to go from 1st gear to 5th gear immediately, the engine will bog down and stall. If you do it perfectly slow then gradually add more speed and if you ever fail at a section, go back to the previous step. Eventually, you'll do a full swing perfectly right off the bat. R.J.
November 2, 2014
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Nick
how do you keep the right arm from moving out. At the top of my back swing my right arm elbow gets away a little bit. Do you keep your arms firm in the stance? I tried to get your rotary arm training aid. I was told the manufacture is behind.
October 23, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Nick, Focus on externally rotating your right humerus at the top of the swing. That will keep your elbow tucked in. It will feel uncomfortable at first but eventually it will happen for you naturally. R.J.
October 23, 2014
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Nick
when do you shift or move that one inch to the right in the takeway? Also when should the hips turn in the takeaway and back swing?
October 22, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Nick, You should start your swing with the weight shift to the right by pushing the right heel into the ground. It gets your swing started without any goofy movements. You should never think about rotating your hips in the backswing. Properly stabilize the hips by activation of the glutes and keeping your knees from moving laterally. During the takeaway, the hips are still. As you move into the backswing the hips are pulled 35-45 degrees by the continual pulling of the scapula towards the spine, gliding across the ribcage. R.J.
October 22, 2014
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Wayne
I cannot understand how you can keep your right arm straight "to pectoral height" while keeping the right arm connected - I need help with this please.
October 17, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Wayne. From Move 1 to Move 2 the right arm will start to add flexion and come away from your side. You definitely don't want to lock the right arm into the body. All you need is to maintain the connection in the upper arm. Around the armpit area. Take a look at the 3 Functions of the Right Arm in the Advanced Backswing Section.
October 17, 2014
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John
Most players I know waggle like Jason Duffner except not with quite as much distance in the movement of the club head. As your instructors have pointed out, this feels powerful, but it is not powerful and it does not represent the proper motion or movement of the wrists in the takeaway. Why do so many waggle in that way, and why shouldn't that type waggle be discouraged?
October 14, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
The more moving parts that we have the harder it is to be consistent. I am sure that most people who watch sports hear commentators commended athletes for not having any wasted movements in their action for their sport. It's pretty simple, each time an athlete moves he or she has a chance of messing up. So, if we limit unnecessary movements, the more likely that we will not put ourselves in a bad position that would require a compensation to be successful. And they do it to make themselves feel comfortable, which is important, but it is not more important than fundamentals. It's a similar dilemma that is see in putting the ball. The slower the put rolls the more the break can have an affect on the ball's path, but the faster the ball rolls, the smaller the effective area of the cup will be where the ball will roll in on the edge. So, just in putting where it is better to roll the ball with a slower speed and get better at reading the break for consistency, it is better to minimalize unnecessary movements and find a way to get comfortable without making unwanted movement. Pros can get away with it because they learned how to incorporate it into their swing, but they practice for hours on end everyday because it's their job. If you have that kind of time, you might as well take the time to learn now to do properly, right? I hope this answered your question, R.J.
October 14, 2014
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edward
Any thoughts on a waggle or forward press before initiation of takeaway using the shoulder glide method?
October 12, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
A waggle is okay, but you don't want to forward press leading into the takeaway. A forward press will get the hands too far ahead of the club which will keep the club behind the body going back in the swing. This produces a flat swing that gets the arms stuck behind the body. I would suggest pressing your right heel into the ground to start your swing as a trigger instead of a forward press. A waggle would generally be a setup routine to make a golfer feel comfortable as opposed to an actual trigger for the swing.
October 12, 2014
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edward
What about a forward press that is just a kick-in of the right knee a la Sam Snead?
October 13, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Edward. We try to shy away from any movement towards the target before any rotation takes place. As R.J. said try to use the weight shift as your trigger. I understand completely trying to find something get yourself moving from such a static position.
October 13, 2014
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Sujit
Should the elevation of the arms start immediately on the takeaway or do you start the elevation later in the takeaway?
October 11, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Good question Sujit! Actually, your arms are gradually elevating at the same rate throughout the entire backswing up until the moment where the right arm flexes upward. At that moment, the arms stop "elevating" from the shoulder joints and only the flexion of the right elbow provides elevation at that point. So, imagine that you're graphing your golf swing on some graphing paper. Point A is the point of where your hands are in the ideal setup position. Point B is where your hands are in between your belt buckle and your pocket. And Point C is where your hands are at the base of your pectoral muscle. You'd want the slope of this line to remain roughly consistent. You wouldn't want a flat slope from A to B and then a steep raise to C, that would cause your club to go inside of the swing plane, then raise above it as the club intersected it vertically, like a reverse Jim Furyk. You want A, B and C to all be on the same curve. A gently, consistent raise in elevation from A to C. And then once you get to C, you flex your right arm to get into the vertical plane. At this point, the left arm should be parallel to your original plane that you just traced with your hands during the takeaway and backswing. I hope this answers your question, Sujit Rusty
October 11, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Sujit. You will start to pull/rotate before elevation starts.
October 11, 2014
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John
I get the part about moving the shoulder blade in towards the spine, but not the downward movement. It seems that with your spine inclined, the shoulder blade would have to move toward the spine, but also necessarily slightly upward as well.
October 8, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello John. Take a look at Understanding Shoulder Blade Glide Video in the Advanced Takeaway Section if you haven't already done so. The upward motion of the blade would be a shoulder shrug. We want to stay in the box. The left lat and other muscles are pulling the blade down to create rotation.
October 8, 2014
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John
When you say the shoulder blade moves down, I think I need some clarity. Down in relation to what? If I'm in golfing posture, then I'm bent from the waist. As I rotate back in the backswing, my shoulder blade has to move up in relation to the ground because I'm bent forward.
October 14, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
The shoulder cap will seem to be going up because you are bent over at an angle rotating around the spine. But, the actual anatomical function to move the shoulder is taking the scapula and pulling it down and in. You are hinged from the hips which cause the appearance of the shoulder going up. However, that big plate on you back is moving towards center and being pulled down. Thats how you rotate around the spine.
October 14, 2014
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Gary
Would I be correct in saying (my swing thought) = the shoulder blade glide pulls your hands along your foot line,while the club head stays out along the target line. ? I've been struggling with taking the club inside recently and this seems to be working. It seems to also have eradicate my over swing and reverse pivot.
October 1, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gary. I understand your thoughts process and great to hear its working on some of your problems. However, try to limit thoughts of club positioning. Don't get too focus on placing, but engaging the muscles correctly. If you turn correctly and add proper elevation, the club will hit its positions.
October 1, 2014
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Christian
Great video ! I use to play hockey and golf right handed for years and racketball in my natural left side. Since 3 years I switched to my natural side and I lost distance ! . Iam strating to hit the ball solidly ( compressing the ball) and straight and it fell like iam playing racketball ! ( thanks to your videos !) Do u think that I should shift my weight in golf like when iam playing racketball or its to much pushing from the left in my case ? I think u should become the next coach of tiger if he wants to win another major !
September 25, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Christian. Thanks for the "nod" to help Tiger. Everyone wants to see him get the swing back together. It's probably a case of the push. Always want to be pulling. Unless, the hips are under working and you need a little help.
September 25, 2014
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william
My take away seems to ĺong I'm over turned a top need to work on right evaluation does that make sense
September 20, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Bill. Without seeing specifics. It would be hard to determine the culprit. Feel free to upload your swing for review. We would be happy to diagnose. In the meantime, just focus on getting 45 degrees of turn in the takeaway with the shoulders. Work on the flexion in the right knee. It will help with over rotation by the body. Right Knee Laser Beam Drill Advanced Backswing Section.
September 20, 2014
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Richard
Hi I've been hitting a lot of balls with my new swing This is what I feel , slight wt transfer to my instep, I feel the right shoulder as I keep turning, My downswing just reacts to the backswing.. It just fires,, I don't think of anything ?, it just fires When I try to consciously try the move. Back to the left , I mess up the timing. My ball striking. Is better now than before. I like the ideas, but it's almost impossible to play golf this way I can't think about ,this when I'm playing... I just try to attack the golf ball on the downswing.. It's hard to play or now..
September 19, 2014
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james (Certified RST Instructor)
Hi Richard, If you are struggling with the move back to the left side then focus on this move. We don't want to be firing everything from the top. You need to work in the 100 reps to start to engrain a new movement pattern and then work to your 3000 - 5000 reps to master the new movement.. it sounds as though your in that stage where you may perform it correctly one rep but not the next. Start slowly, and then build up to full speed.. make sure you don't jump from slow to full speed as we don't learn well in this manner.
September 19, 2014
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Richard
Hi In my takeaway, my front knee moves a few inches to the right, does this cause any problems or do I try hard to laser the knee as suggested Also , this is a big change for me.. When I play on the course, do I try it incorporate this. Perfect takeaway or Do I play. Golf. With smaller. Adjustments. Thanks Rich
September 9, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Rich. While making swing changes, playing golf can be difficult with all the thoughts. Try and limit the majority of the thoughts on the course. Keep it to something simple and make lots of good practice swings.
September 9, 2014
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Christopher
During my takeaway the toe of the club is not pointing upwards. Is this a grip thing
September 4, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Christopher. It could be a grip issue and/or a rotational issue. Take a look at the Unleash Your Thumbnail for Power Video in the Advanced Takeaway Section. If you can't get it from the thumb up position. Make sure the grip isn't too strong.
September 4, 2014
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Chris
it looks to me that his right shoulder blade goes up not down... I agree it's going back in towards the spine, but I don't get or see it moving down.
September 1, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Take a look at the Understanding Shoulder Blade Glide Movement in the Advanced Takeaway Section. Hopefully, this will help the explanation of down and in.
September 1, 2014
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Chris
so to 9 o'clock the hips don't move... is that correct??? and if so when do the hips move???
August 31, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
The hips move very minimally in the takeaway. You want the pull from the shoulder blade and torso to open the hips going back. Roughly 45 degrees from 9 O'Clock to the top.
September 1, 2014
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Stewart
i guess what I am trying to say is that I feel that the arms are moving completely independent to the rotating of the shoulder blade. so when I rotate my shoulder blade 2 inches and down I feel that I am guessing where my hands and arms need to be in the swing. Rather than the rotation of the shoulder blades setting/moving the hand and arms into the right position every time. my main problem has been moving the club way inside the plane.
August 31, 2014
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Stewart
I am concentrate on moving the shoulder blade but this does not move the club. Unless I tense my arms and move the club then the club does not move. So I am struggling to understand how to you get to the right position every time as I feel I am guess where the club should go on the takeaway and I am on the wrong plane from the start of the swing.
August 30, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Stewart. Try the 2 inch hand drill in the Role of the Right Arm Advanced Takeaway Section. Learn the motion of how pulling back moves the arms. Add a club from there.
September 1, 2014
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David
I love the shoulder blade 2inch move as my takeaway. However, I've noticed the club is moving back on the inside. Is there a tip/video to keep the club on plane please? Also, I over-swing a lot no matter how hard I try. I would love to have a back swing that takes my left arm to parallel (to ground). I can do it in a practice swing but if I try it on the course, I end up jerking/rushing at the downswing. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
August 14, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello David. Use the Over Swinging Video in the Advanced Backswing Section to get more humeral rotation and shorten up the swing. The Understanding Shoulder Elevation Video in the Backswing Section will help get the club in front (also, 4 Square Drill - Advanced Backswing).
August 14, 2014
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Joe
At present I can not get photo .perhaps next week but I would appreciate your suggesting what I can do to correct pulls .I am playing tomorrow in the AM
August 7, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
If you are pulling the ball. Make sure you are on plane and the club face is square. Use the Stop Coming Over the Top Video in the Downswing Section to get on plane. The 5 Mins to a Perfect Release Video in the same section to get it square and releasing.
August 7, 2014
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Joe
I like your clear and usable instructions.I'm doing the drills but when I play I'm hitting the ball solid BUT a lot of pulls some really bad.Please thell me what I can do to stop pulling the ball-help!
August 7, 2014
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Patrick (Certified RST Instructor)
Hi Joe, Have you uploaded your swing for a review? That's the only way to properly diagnose the issue.
August 7, 2014
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Patrick (Certified RST Instructor)
Pulling with the right shoulder blade does not alter the plane on which the shoulders turn because you are rotating around the same axis point (the spine) as you hinge from the hips. The angle of the spine at address would have to change for the shoulders to begin turning on a different plane. Usually, this would happen if the golfer thrusts his or her hips towards the ball on the take away. The the only difference is the force of movement we use TO rotate (push vs. pull). Pushing gets your hands and arms in a "deep" position, which then forces you to make compensatory moves later in the swing. Also, do you use impact tape on your irons to see exactly where the ball is making contact on the club face?
August 7, 2014
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John
I understand the point of the shoulder blade glide, however, doesn't the shoulder blade glide promote a level shoulder rotation...then i hit off of the toe of the club. When I swing back with the left shoulder and arm and the shoulders on a more inclined plane, then i can hit the sweet spot. I can't seem to "stay down" with the technique on the back swing? Please comment...
August 6, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey John. The spine angle at address sets the shoulder plane. The motion of pulling the scapula down and in is the actual motion to produce a shoulder turn. The shoulders shouldn't change their levels by performing this move. You are rotating around the spine. The tilt of the shoulders will remain the same. Take a look at the Creating a Swing Plane Video in the Advanced Backswing Section. You will see how the right creates the plane with rotation versus trying to maintain with a left shoulder push.
August 6, 2014
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John
Excellent video...the motion of pulling the scapula during the baseball throwing motion is very noticeable (obviously I've done it for years)...however, i can't feel it yet during the takeaway when I'm playing. That motion is still very foreign from a golf perspective, but I'll continue to drill it until those muscles wake up. I've always been a left side pusher. In addition, what i discovered in my swing, is that having the club in a neutral position at address versus pointing up my left thigh really creates a huge benefit in swing arc going back (much wider) and puts my swing in a much better position to transfer weight and make a better rotary swing.
August 7, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello John. Keep up the good work. Yes, the lean of the club at address is a very important concept often overlooked. You sound like you are on the right track. Club neutral, not too far forward. Sit with your back along a wall or chair. Make the shoulder blade motion. You will feel it push against the wall or chair. Help you learn the sensation.
August 7, 2014
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Joe
DOES YOUR ARMS STAY ON YOUR CHEST IN THE BACKSWING?JOE M
August 5, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Joe. There will be connection between the upper bicep and upper pectoral. However, don't try and glue your arms to your side.
August 5, 2014
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Fraser
So after setup... the right shoulder is lower than left due to the 5 - 10 degrees of tilt. If I simply turn shoulders the assembly will drag into ground since tilt has changed low point. I'm guessing hand lift and rotation is required as a start before the shoulder turn ?
August 5, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Fraser. Axis tilt and the right hand being lower on the club attribute to the right shoulder being a touch lower. During the takeaway there is elevation as rotation occurs. Focus on the rotational aspect first. It is more important. Then work on blending the two moves with the 5 Mins to the Perfect Takeaway (Takeaway Section) and Shoulder Elevation Video (Backswing Section).
August 5, 2014
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Fraser
I get that but i think elevation occurs from momentum and right arm flex. Its the start of takeaway.. must be lift in fingers in hands .. as well as shoulder back rotation?
August 5, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
There is shoulder flexion and wrist set in the takeaway. Those combined get the club enough vertical, so that the rotation doesn't get the club too low or behind the sternum. If your club is dragging. You might be pushing the shoulder down. The initiation of the rotation with the scapula shouldn't drop the shoulder low enough for the club to get stuck. Rotate, then slightly elevate.
August 6, 2014
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Fraser
Tks.. let me try and get back to you.
August 6, 2014
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sheldon
Can you have the feeling of just turning your back to the target in the back swing as long as turn around your spine or is the only way to pull the right shoulder back ? When I pull the right shoulder back the club comes inside to early.
August 4, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Sheldon. If you are pulling with the right and the club comes inside early. You are probably not adding enough shoulder elevation or rolling the hands too soon. Take a look at the 4 Square Video in the Advanced Backswing Section to make sure you add proper shoulder elevation. Also, the One Simple Takeaway Fix in the Advanced Takeaway Section to keep the wrist from rolling too much.
August 4, 2014
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Jon
hi, can you confirm at what point on the backswing its ok to start moving your wrists in an upwards direction (i dont mean bending back)? My local pro saw me practicing the 9 to 3 (and full shots too), and said he thought it looked like i was trying to almost use a putter stroke and that my pull back looked really low and rigid. I think that is my attempts at keeping my arms straight on the take away up to 9 o'clock, and just rotating as you describe in your videos. He said i need to get some upwards movements in my wrists, but when i look through your videos it says that it should only happen after you get to 9 (unless ive miss understood, which is quite possible). Any thoughts on this? I still seem to be hitting the ground behind the ball at the moment, but hoping to see some improvements soon! Cheers
July 31, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
There is a gradual wrist set in the golf swing. You are correct about needing some and vertical movement. There is 25 % of the wrist set in the takeaway. Shoulder elevation to the base of the trail pocket and 25% wrist set with the club parallel to the ground. Take a look at the 5 Mins to a Perfect Takeaway Video in this section. About 22-23 minutes into it. Chuck will discuss. It will continue from there.
July 31, 2014
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Keighley
Should this already start to give a slightly coiled feel ?
July 28, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Keighley. Yes, you should be feeling some coil.
July 28, 2014
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Tom
As you move your shoulder toward your spine how do keep arms and hands passive so the club gets in correct position? I seem to have a tendency to want to throw the club around my body on the take away and on the downswing I end up hitting a lot of shanked shots.
July 25, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Tom. In the takeaway, the arms need to be nice and passive, but also have elevation to keep the club in front. Work on the 2 inch hand drill in the Role of the Right Arm Video in the Takeaway Advanced Section. Maintain the 2 inch gap and finger tip length. It will help with using rotation versus swinging the arms. Take a look at the 4 Square Drill in the Advanced Backswing Section. A good drill to keep the arms in front while using rotation.
July 25, 2014
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Evan
When does the shoulder blade glide move happen in relation to working into your right heel in the weight shift?
July 23, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
The shoulder blade glide movement happens right off the ball. Some students have a hard time feeling everything at once. The typical thought we give them is right heel right shoulder. Just to help initiate a little movement. From such a static position.
July 23, 2014
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jim
Is there any shoulder elevation during the takeaway? If so how much?
July 22, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Jim. There is a slight amount of shoulder elevation in the takeaway. It will be when the hands reach the base of the right pocket (club parallel to ground).
July 22, 2014
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Paul
In the video it shows that you need to have both arms during takeaway. However, for me, when I get parallel to the ground my right arm starts to bend. I've also seen couple instructors do the same. Is it ok for your right arm to start bending as it gets closer to 90 degrees? or does it need to be straight? Paul
July 15, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Paul. Preferably the right arm needs to be straight. The longer the right arm stays straight, the easier to keep the shoulder blade engaged. Moving the club with the body, instead of independently with the arms. Take a look at the Role of the Right Arm Video in the Takeaway Advanced Section. Try the 2 inch hand drill. Maintain the 2 inch gap and check to see the finger tips stay relatively the same. If you can complete it. The right arm will remain straight.
July 15, 2014
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Tom
Hi guys. I understand to keep the arms in front of the chest during the takeaway - but at the end of the takeaway the chest has rotated ~45 degrees +/- while the hips haven't. This would put the arms hands out at 45 degrees from the target line. In Chucks takeaway video its clear that at the end of the takeaway his arms at parallel to the target line meaning that the arms had to have moved more than the chest and gotten a little behind - or that there is some hip rotation as well during the takeaway. Can you please elaborate?
July 14, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Tom. There is a slight amount of hip turn in the takeaway. Very minimal though. Shoulder elevation is what keeps the arms from getting behind the chest and staying in front on the sternum. Take a look at the 5 Minutes to the Perfect Takeaway in the Takeaway Section for more information. Also, the Shoulder Elevation Video in the Backswing Section will give a good visual of how the arms work vertically to stay in front of a body that is moving horizontally.
July 14, 2014
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Edward
Reviewed the lesson, I have a question regarding arm position. If in the takeaway the torso only moves a few inches about a 45 degree angle the arms should be perpendicular to the chest. In the lesson the club gets to parallel to the target line therefore there must be some movement of the arms across the chest?..?? Please clarify Ty
July 11, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Edward. In the takeaway, shoulder elevation is what allows for the arms to stay centered with the sternum and not let the arms swing across the chest. Take a look at the Shoulder Elevation Video in the Backswing Section for more info. The slight vertical movement of the arms keep them in front and not allowing them to push across the chest.
July 11, 2014
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William
What is your trigger to initiate the takeaway?
July 9, 2014
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Patrick (Certified RST Instructor)
Hi William, see the reply to Roger's question below. Craig answered this quite nicely. Everybody's "trigger" is different. It may be a mental countdown, a very slight bump towards the target, or a waggle. Some might feel the adbdominals engage right before the lats do. Regardless, the motion should definitely be felt in the lats while the takeaway is being initiated.
July 9, 2014
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Roger
Which muscles are engaged for the takeaway and in what sequence? Does the right latissimus dorsi fire first to move the shoulder blade towards the spine, followed by the right oblique to continue pulling the right side?
July 9, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Roger. You will want to feel the right lat engage and start to pull the scapula down and in towards the spine. Followed by the use of the right oblique to rotate the torso. As you are settling 1 inch into the right glute.
July 9, 2014
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charles
I sometimes move my head toward the ball during the take away so my weight shifts toward my toes. . It this s set up problem with weight to far on the heels or maybe a take away to far outside. Maybe both?
July 8, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Charles. It sounds like a combination of both. (For Right Handed) Make sure the weight stays centered over the ankle joints and shifts into the right glute. Take a look at the Understanding Weight Shift Video Part 1. Pushing from the left shoulder too soon in the takeaway can move the head outside. Take a look at the 5 Minutes to Master Rotation in the Takeaway Section. Make sure you solely rotate using the right shoulder blade and oblique to initiate the swinging motion of the club. Not the left arm push.
July 8, 2014
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Gregory
I have found at times when i rotate and then begin my elevation in the backswing my left knee collapses a little (moves in) is this ok or should i try to keep it stable?
July 4, 2014
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Steven (Certified RST Instructor)
Greg, There is going to be a little movement of the left knee becuase of the rotation in the backswing, But we don't want to move it knowingly. Check out the left knee laser beam drill in the takeaway section this will give you a really good understanding of what the left knee is supposed to do in the backswing.
July 4, 2014
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TIM
The most eye opening thing I have even seen in golf instruction, This move solved so many problems.
June 28, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Tim. Keep those eyes wide open. Your just on Move 1. Lots more to learn! Happy to hear it's helping.
June 28, 2014
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Gene
Does rotation and elevation start at the same time? I do understand that rotation, elevation and flexion must occur.
June 18, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
There is more rotation off the ball than elevation, but there is some in the takeaway. Only a slight amount. Very gradual. Off the ball focus more on rotation aspect. As you continue from the takeaway. You will continue to rotate as you add more elevation, leading to flexion of the arm.
June 18, 2014
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lou
While doing the takeaway drills something occurred to me that I'd like to check out as to RST training. Right before I start the takeaway, I've tried gently pushing down on the shaft with the right hand to slightly extend right arm and help keep it long and straight. It sure helps keep a "one-piece" feel, and an engaged feeling goes up the right arm and gets me in touch with the right shoulder to start the 2 inch move. Not unlike a forward press. What's your view of this?
June 17, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
We try to stay away from teaching feelings. Because everyone feels different things. For example. Feeling my grip pressure at a 2/10 might be a 5/10 for you. If everything is working properly. Do what works. But, we would prefer that the origin of movement started from the shoulder, than tensing the arm and hand to get your motor running.
June 17, 2014
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Jason
Hi guys just wanted to start off by saying since last November when I joined my game has gotten a lot better last year was in low to mid 90s this year low to mid 80s I have improved all parts of my game so thank you. But I feel like I still struggle with my takeaway almost like its hard to just start moving. On video I still seem to takeaway outside of plane a little bit and instead of elevation I shrug shoulders up. I have watched every video on takeaway and backswing more than once and still use lots of the drills was wondering if maybe I'm missing something. Thanks guys
June 15, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hmm. It sounds like you have studied the correct videos on the site. I would suggest uploading your swing to our online review system. One of our instructors should be able to spot the culprit.
June 16, 2014
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Craig
I'm actively golfing with commitments to play league,etc. I noticed the videos tend to suggest not hitting golf balls until you've mastered the setup, takeaway, and rotation. Does this mean I should suspend my activity on this site until after golf season? In other words, can I simultaneously work on the basic setup, takeaway, and rotation and still play occasional golf?
June 14, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Yes, you can work on the swing while playing. It is tough however to get all the principles down the swiftest. The typical saying is 1 day of golf, deletes 2 days of practice. If you want to play. Try and keep in mind at least one or two principles your working on. Make lots of practice swings.
June 16, 2014
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Wayne
Hello - as I practice the back swing, I tend to disconnect my right arm and don't feel the tension in the right lat.
May 24, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Take a look at the Role of the Right Arm Video in the Full Swing Advanced Takeaway Section. Use the 2 inch hand drill to help feel the motion correctly. If you do a few reps maintaining the 2 inch gap, you should start to feel the proper engagement.
May 24, 2014
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David
I am a little confused about how the takeaway interacts with the hip bump/spine tilt. If the spine is tilted away from the ball and the first move of the takeaway is to rotate the shoulders perpendicularly around the spine, that would seem to imply the club head moves a little down as it starts to move back. This is causing me problems, particularly in the rough where the head catches in the grass. Does either the shoulder elevation or the wrist cock start immediately to counter this effect? Am I misunderstanding the move? Thanks for your help!
May 21, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
The axis tilt at address is just a touch. If you are over doing the axis tilt it would cause the club to start dragging or bottoming out too early. Make sure you aren't over doing it. Feel free to upload a Face On and Down the Line view for review to have one of our instructors check out the situation. The wrist cock is very gradual. We don't want to initiate it too early. The club will stay a little low until we start to add shoulder elevation and slight cocking of the wrist. Situational dependent for very high rough the club might need to be setting earlier.
May 21, 2014
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mike
Am i correct in my thinking that when your bringing the club back and the shaft is pointing at 9:00, your hands should be over your toes and not inside or over your ankles? This video is simple, but when watching it appears that the hands are getting inside a little quick?
May 20, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Mike, yes you are correct. We don't want the hands too inside. Chuck is making sure to hit the point its a big body turn and passive arm swing. He lacks just a touch of shoulder elevation in this video, just making sure we focus on turning using the right shoulder blade versus excessive arm swing or placement of the club.
May 21, 2014
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Denis
I have a very very bad habbit. In my takeaway sequence I lose visual control with ball and try to check where is my clubhead where are my hands etc. As a result I hit the ball as blind and all depends from luck rather than from my swing. Please, PLEASE give me exercise to kill this wont.
May 11, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Denis, you are going to need to keep drilling checking things on camera an in a mirror while you do so. The after you get enough reps in to where the takeaway has become movement pattern you can perform without thinking about it, focus your left eye on the back of the golf ball and perform the takeaway. Check it on camera and see how it looks against your drill swings. Once it looks good this way, then try to keep the focus on the back of the ball with the left eye as you work through the entire swing.
May 11, 2014
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mike
I watch this and it appears to me that your hands are getting way too far back inside quickly? From recent reviews, your hands should be in front of your toes when the club is at 9:00, your hands are centered over your foot or close to the ankle? The box or bucket drill appear to do the same motion, gets your ands back quickly inside which is what you shouldnt be doing? What am I missing here?
May 8, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
This camera angle is giving you that appearance. Go to the self analysis tab and load the down the line 8 iron swing of Chuck. Draw a elbow plane line up from the hozel through the base of the elbow. This view is set up perfectly to look at how the hands work and stay out in front of the chest in the takeaway. At a completed takeaway, you are looking for the hands to be a pocket height with the butt end of the club facing down the line, hands should be just over the toes based on a bit of gradual shoulder elevation, shoulders at roughly 45 and minimal hip turn. The hands are not really getting inside quickly on the videos that you mention and follow that list of checkpoints that I wrote and you should be in a good spot.
May 8, 2014
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James
Hi,I've been working for the past 8 mornings and nights doing the drills at home and then this evening,I went to the range and hit balls. My first few 9 irons felt great so I asked my friend to record my swing. I couldn't believe. Still way inside at 9 o'clock. Am still starting my swing with shoulders not engaged until I have the club taken back 2 feet. When I did a practice swing in the mirror,it looked good at 9 o clock and on plane at the top not my usual crossing the line at the top but as soon as I step up to a ball, I default back to my old swing. Very frustrating as I felt over past 8 days, something had finally clicked. Does this mean I'm not getting it? How is the best way to exaggerate it (which will probably mean I'm actually doing it correct)?
May 6, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
no you are getting it. It just takes time and full kinesthetic awareness which you are creating through your drilling. When we put the golf ball down, we lose the awareness rather quickly and it just means you are going to have to slow down and continue to drill. Over exaggerating is a good idea at first.
May 7, 2014
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Jason
When I work on this drill I feel as though I'm activating the shoulders from the very beginning of the backswing, which gets me out of the box. I also feel like I'm pulling the club around and up with my right hand as I try to "move" my shoulder blade down and in. So is the shoulder blade movement what starts the backswing or is there another movement that makes the shouldler blade move down and in?
May 6, 2014
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Jason
I watched the bucket drill video and that really helped, but the best thing was I read an attached article written by Chuck below and he described the motion as the same one that you do when you wind up to throw a baseball. That made perfect sense to me and I actually got in my posture and created that motion and then added the club and it's much smoother and natural feeling now. Maybe I coached myself, but any other insight or corrections would be apreciated too.
May 6, 2014
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James
This really helped me this evening getting out hitting balls for the first time after working indoors on the drill. I found recording myself though that I am still over swinging and crossing the line a bit at the top (much better than I was). Is there a drill to watch or a feel I can work on to avoid over swinging with arms and hands after my shoulders have finished rotating?
May 1, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Just make sure you have a good awareness of the right glute loading up and a good awareness of the rotation and work very hard to get the hands and the arms to stop when the rotation does. There is a video in the program section that is called load the right glute shorten swing start transition.
May 1, 2014
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patrick
i have a problem with my left wrist bowing. I can hit my irons, 7 & up ok, but everything else is not good my driver, woods ,and hybrid are low trajectory. the 5 & 6 iron aren't much better. any drills to help rectify this
April 27, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
You may be trying to hang on to lag much too long into the hitting area. I would focus on making sure that you are not creating a ton of forward shaft lean with these clubs and may want to consider starting your release a bit sooner.
April 27, 2014
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James
As you move the right shoulder blade in and down, toward your spine, should you feel any muscle tension (light or strong) in your right shoulder blade?
April 23, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
No you shouldn't feel any crazy amount of tension. Be sure that you are in neutral posture and aren't trying to retract the shoulder blades too much.
April 25, 2014
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Mark
I finally got a chance to play and regressed as expected.. I have struggled with getting the club up through the hands when viewed from behind.. As I was doing the drills to get the takaway on the right line, I found that if I set up with my hands higher at address it seemed to help. I understand that proper rotation is what we striving for but even when I rotated, the club was outside my hands. I am short legged and long in the body. Does this make sense?
April 22, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Mark, I am a little reluctant to tell you that that it is ok to move the hands up at address, we want the hands and arms to be passive at address and they need to hang from the shoulder line. If the club is staying outside of your hands, make sure that you are setting the club properly and also not overdoing any shoulder elevation. Use the base of your pocket for the height of the hands as a reference point.
April 23, 2014
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Mark
Thanks for the info. I may have been bent over too much. My hands were below my pockets and the slightly more upright stance feels more athletic and balanced. When in that stance my hands are not as low and seem to come up on the right plane easier. I am due for a review but I want to get back to at least where I was before sending it. Almost puked when I saw the slow motion after the regression. A lot of reps reversed in 3 rounds. At least I know what to watch for now. Thanks.
April 23, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Mark, completely understandable. Just stay patient and hit the needed rep range in a slow methodical way each time you practice and things will come back around for you in no time.
April 24, 2014
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greg
As the downswing starts towards the target, what moves backwards? Thanks!
April 22, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Sorry, I dont understand the question? Are you referring to downswing sequencing?
April 22, 2014
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greg
Yes, Chris. In the downswing sequencing, what moves back?
April 23, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
When you say moves back I am still a bit unclear. We are looking to shift the hips before the completion of the backswing to load up the left side. Then as you are driving the left heel into the ground and using the left obliques to rotate the torso and pull the left hip away from the target, the hands and arms are falling straight down in then releasing through the hitting area. Hope that helps.
April 23, 2014
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greg
Chuck says that as one part moves one direction in the swing, another moves the opposite direction. My question is What moves backward as the hips, arms, etc move forward in the downswing?
April 26, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
You are pulling the left hip away from the target so I guess that would be considered backward. We are always pulling towards center.
April 26, 2014
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Paul
In the takeaway, will the shoulders be perfectly perpendicular to the spine or does the shoulder blade guide down and back make the shoulders slightly flat? Paul
April 18, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
The shoulder blade glide will cause the shoulders to rotate perpendicular to the spine during the takeaway.
April 19, 2014
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James
In all of your videos you discuss pulling the rt shoulder blade back & down 2 inches like throwing a baseball. I can move my the shoulder blade just fine with out a golf club. As soon as I add a golf club the movement isn't free flowing I feel as if I'm locking them to my side. Any suggestions or drill so I can feel the free movement that I do without the golf club with the golf club.
April 16, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Check out the bucket drill and see if that helps out.
April 19, 2014
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James
Chris, initially I didn't think your drill was applicable, but when I thought through it and performed the drill it actually did move my shoulder blade down and in as required. My takeaway is perfect every time as expected. Thank you! As soon as I have mastered the rotation and follow through I will be on my way.
April 23, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
My pleasure Jim, I am here to help as much as possible and very glad to hear this helped you get the correct movements.
April 24, 2014
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david
What exactly is the lower trap, as listed below?
April 16, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey David, here is a good article with pictures showing what I am speaking of http://www.rotaryswing.com/golf-instruction/golfbiomechanics/rotation-in-golf-the-shoulder-blade-glide
April 16, 2014
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Daniel
when i bring the club back im pulling with the right shoulder however the club is not going parralel to the target line instead its staying outside. How do i solve this problem?
April 15, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Dan, make sure there is a bit of forearm rotation and a bit of wrist set (cocking of wrist) to support the club as you complete the takeaway.
April 16, 2014
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john
Hi , I am having problems finding videos on the new website. Where did they all go? For ex. I am in takeawy and there is only 1 vbideo choice(move1). The old site was great but I am struggling with this new one!
April 15, 2014
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Jim
I understand what the shoulder blade does but which muscle is used?, oblique? Where would I feel the pull comes from?
April 14, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
The obliques and the lats are the muscles you will be most aware of. The lower trap is connecting the scapula to the big muscles but most students have very little awareness of the lower trap.
April 16, 2014
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David
Hi Guys, could someone please clarify something for me, when your teaching the takeaway you talk about not using your arms or hands only your shoulders but the hands or arms must aid in the movement because if not the club is awkward and heavy?
April 10, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
You want the hands and the arms to be as passive as possible. The setting of the wrists will support the club at the completion of the takeaway. The idea is not to allow the movement to be started by the hands and the arms which generally puts momentum i the club head and then will generally produce a armsy like out of sequence swing and not allow you to rotate and build efficient power within the body.
April 10, 2014
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Kevin
I have been struggling with hinging my right wrist in the takeaway, can someone please tell me where the butt of the club should be pointing at the completion of the takeaway?
June 11, 2015
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Should be down the target line. Club shaft should be parallel to the ground which would indicate enough wrist set.
June 11, 2015

Golf Takeaway

Mastering the golf takeaway is critical to getting your golf swing started off on the right foot - and the way we do it with RotarySwing Tour is incredibly simple! In this golf instruction video, you're going to see just how simple the golf swing takeaway can really be and learn how to get your golf backswing started down the right path everytime.

You'll see that the way you've been trying to master the takeaway has caused you grief because you've probably been fixated on moving the golf club rather than your body. The trick is I'm going to teach you how to move your a specific part of your body only 2 inches and that will move the club about 6 feet!! Crazy, right?!

It's true. And this movement is so simple a cave man could do it! It will give you a simple mental key to focus on while mastering your new move, making it easy to pull the trigger to get your golf swing started. 

So, if you've struggled with your takeaway and want to simplify your golf swing, watch this video!

Swing Tips and Drills

The golf takeaway drills in this instruction video are so incredibly simple, you won't believe it at first. That's because Rotary Swing Tour focuses on moving the body rather than the golf club. You see, the club head is going to move hundreds of times further throughout the golf swing than the body. For the golf takeaway, we're focusing on moving just one part of the body about 2 inches to move the club 72"!!! 

For a proper golf takeaway, it's going to be a LOT easier for you to learn how to move your body two inches than it will ever be for you to try and move the clubhead 36 times that far! If you're looking for golf takeaway tips, that's a pretty darn good one!

So, if you're trying to master the golf takeaway, no one is going to teach you how to do it simpler than Rotary Swing.

The takeaway is one of the quickest ways for you to mess up your golf swing in the first couple inches that the club moves back. It's such a critical part of the swing. It's not the time that you hit the ball. That's the most important part. But it sets up what's going to happen before you hit the ball. So getting the takeaway right is not an option. It's so easy to get right.

                I promise you, when you go through the golf swing drills that are in this video, you will be able to master the takeaway, and you'll be as good as any tour pro in the world. You're literally going to focus on just moving your body this much. About 2 inches is going to move the club all the way from here to here, about 6 or 7 feet, and you're going to move 2 inches.

                Let's look at how we need to get our body to move, to move this club into a perfect position. The key comes down to one simple thing, and that is understanding your shoulder blade. Now, everybody's got these shoulder blades back here. It's just what allows your arm all of this great mobility. It's a gliding joint and it can move all over the surface of your ribcage back here.

                The key point that you're going to focus on is one simple movement, and that is imagining if my hand was my shoulder blade, and this was my spine, I'm going to just move my shoulder blade in towards my spine. Now technically, it goes slightly down, partly because the muscle fibers on your trap are oriented that way. But we also want to stay connected to our core. So as that shoulder blade's moving slightly down and in, but I want you to focus just on in. That's going to move the club all the way back during the takeaway.

                But the important thing is, it's pulling. The pulling motion is going to move your spine. You move your shoulder blade in towards center. That's a critical part of the swing. The swing is rotational in nature, hence the name rotary swing. I wasn't that clever when I came up with the name. It's just describing exactly what's going on. You're moving your body in a circle, and that's creating centripetal force. The result of that is going to be, of course, centrifugal force. That's what's acting on the club.

                So may golfers want to use linear force and just move the club around with their arms and hands and try to push it all over the place. It won't move nearly as fast as just moving your body really small amounts. By definition, the idea of efficiency is you moving as little as humanly possible to get a great big result to move something else a long ways. Learning this 2-inch shoulder blade glide is the epitome of that. It's going to get you to move the club 6 or 7 feet, and you're literally only going to move your body 2 inches.

                That shoulder blade glide, so many people, when I talk about moving down, they start tilting their shoulders. It's really important that you understand the plane that your shoulders have got to rotate on. By taking a club and just putting it across my shoulders while standing straight up, what I'm going to do is try and feel pulling my shoulder blade back in towards my spine. This is key, because as you'll notice, as I pull my shoulder blade back, my head stays nice and centered.

                If I focus on what so many instructors talk about with taking the lead shoulder and pushing it under my chin, well, all of a sudden it becomes a moving target, because pushing moves away from center, away from the force of movement. Think about it. If you're pushing a chair across the room, it's trying to move away from you. You're the force of movement. It's going to tend to move. It's not going to want to travel in a perfectly straight line, because it's going to want to rotate around its center of gravity.

                When you're pulling something, though, we've all played golf in a push cart or a pull cart, depending on how you want to use it. If you pull it, it travels in a perfectly straight line right behind you. But when you push, it tends to kind of zigzag down the fairway. When you pull something, it moves in towards center, in towards the force of movement, and it's center. Center's a specific point. We can be very, very specific about the center.

                But when you're trying to push something towards a target, pushing's always moving in 360 possible different degrees away from center. This is why so many people, when they take that advice of pushing their shoulder under their chin, their head moves all over the place, and all of a sudden their swing is no longer centered and becoming a consistent ball striker becomes really tough.

                We want to have as few moving parts as humanly possible with a rotary swing. We're trying to stay very quiet and very centered, while still recruiting a lot of muscle fibers, because we need that for power in the swing, and we're going to really rely on the muscles in our core, and our trunk, and our legs to produce that power. So right from the get go, we're going to start engaging them.

                But the first thing I want you to understand is this shoulder blade glide, that while you're standing straight up, as I pull my right shoulder straight in towards my spine, and only turn about 45 degrees, that's all we're trying to accomplish during the takeaway, that my shoulders rotate perpendicular to my spine, or parallel to the ground while I'm standing straight up. Now as I tilt forward, they're still going to do that. They're still going to rotate 90 degrees to my spine. But because my shoulders are now on an inclined plane because my spine is hinged forward. Now it's going to look like that left shoulder goes down.

                This is a critical piece of the swing. So many golfers turn flat. Then to make up for this flat shoulder turn they've got to do a bunch of work with their arms to try to get the club up in the air. If you get your left shoulder to go down, that will help your hands go up. If you turn really flat, they're going to be wanting to go really flat. So it's really important that you understand pulling the shoulder blade back in towards your spine. Your shoulders should be on an inclined plane.

                Now in doing this, this should move the club all the way to here. The check point for the takeaway is the club should be parallel to the ground, parallel to the target line, and right over my toes, with the club face toed up. All I have to do to accomplish that, pull my shoulder blade back and shift my weight to the right. Now all of a sudden, the club goes right where we want it to without me having to worry about moving the golf club.

                I'm not trying to move the club as I do this. In fact, I don't want you to try to move the club at first. I want you to learn this just by moving your body. Put your arms across your chest. Get into your setup. Pull your shoulder blade back while shifting your weight to the right. As I do that, you'll see my left shoulder goes down. My right shoulder goes up. But I'm not pulling it up. I'm just pulling it in, straight in towards my spine. Now I've made a perfect takeaway. This is all it is, literally. If you can't do this, you can't play golf. It's this simple. Anybody can make a perfect takeaway.

                Where people go wrong with the takeaway is they're doing way too much. They're doing way too much with their arms, and hands, and their wrists, and they're trying to just move the club all over the place. Don't get fixated on moving the golf club. Move your body. That will move your arms, which will move the golf club. Understand that sequence. Every movement in the swing is happening from the inside out.

                So many people try to move from the outside in. They try to get fixated on this club and hitting the ball, and then golf becomes nearly impossible to play consistently. All we're trying to do, pull the shoulder blade back. If you pull it back, it's going to turn your body. It's going to keep you nice and centered. As you shift your weight, takeaway is done.

                Now the shoulder blade glide, it's a great movement to initiate centered rotation. But it's not the only mover. The primary mover of your torso in the takeaway is your obliques, these muscles on the side. These are what rotate you. As you're doing this drill standing just straight up, you also want to feel your obliques starting to engage. If you try to keep your hips pretty quiet during the takeaway, you can feel these muscles, this one's starting to stretch, and this one's trying to contract.

                But as they twist you, it's like you're just going to turn and talk to somebody. Don't get too fixated on trying to feel so much and get really tight. Just think if you're going to turn and talk to somebody 45 degrees away from you. That's it. Just start to feel these muscles engage. They're the primary movers of your ribcage. If you combine this feeling of twisting your ribcage using those obliques, while pulling the shoulder blade back, you're going to stay perfectly centered and have a perfect takeaway every single time.

                Start out without a golf club. Get into your setup. Get your axis tilt, arms across your chest. Pull your shoulder blade back, and feel your ribcage twisting from the obliques while pushing your right ankle to the ground. If you can do these simple moves, then take your hands, let them hang out nice and relaxed, and do the same movement. Notice how little my arms and hands are moving. They're going to do a little bit, and what is that little bit?

                Well, one, there's going to be a little bit of arm elevation from the shoulders during the takeaway. It's only going to be about that much. My hands are going to go from here to here during that takeaway move. We need some elevation, otherwise our hands are going to be really low and shallow, and we're going to lose a lot of width during the takeaway. You're going to move your hands. If I don't move my hands with no elevation, this is where they'd be. We need a little bit of width. So they're going to go up and down a little bit during that takeaway move.

                There's also going to be a little bit of rotation to get that club face toed up. The club face is always rotating throughout the entire golf swing. The worst thing that you can do is try to hold the club face square to the target line the whole time. The club face is designed as a tool to rotate around the hosel. That's why they put the hosel in the heel, instead of in the center of the face. So a little bit of rotation in your forearms is required, just a small amount, to get that club face toed up.

                Then the last thing is there's going to be a little bit of wrist cock. Not a ton. It's so subtle. It's really just your body responding to the weight of the club. If I didn't set my wrists, this is going to feel really awkward. I want to just set my wrists as the hands get about a foot outside my right thigh. The club is going to set to parallel to the ground. That's it.

                The hand movement and the arm movement is really natural. It's not anything you're trying to manipulate. You want to focus on moving your body. Learn to move your body correctly, 2 inch shoulder blade glide in towards your spine, feeling the muscles in your obliques work, pushing your right to the ground, and you'll have a perfect takeaway, as good as any tour pro in the world.

We're after one thing: Real Results - Real Fast. And that's exactly what our members achieve. And that's why they say the AXIOM is: Mind-blowing. Game changing. Revolutionary.

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