RotaryConnect Chipping

Fix your bad chipping habits and ingrain perfect technique with the RotaryConnect.

  • Many training aids offer a "Band-Aid" solution that frequently solves one problem only to create another
  • The RotaryConnect teaches you what correct movement feels like - it can't be overused or create new problems
  • Many golfers use their arms too much in the chipping stroke, pulling back or flipping the club
  • The RotaryConnect helps preserve proper arm position through the swing so you learn how the movement should feel
  • The RotaryConnect is adjustable - be sure to fit it to your body size so your back is not rounded


Hey guys, Chuck Quinton here, founder of Rotary Swing. You guys have been asking how do I use the Rotary Connect with chipping stuff, can I use it with my short game stuff? The answer is, absolutely. The area that it applies the most to is one of the areas that most golfers struggle the most with, which is just this basic little bump and run kind of chip shot. So, I have here, my seven iron and I want to show you how you can use the Connect to teach you how to synchronize the movement of your arms and the club with your body. Because, in the short game stuff, we're not trying to build a lot of power and accuracy, which is when we want our arms to start moving independently of our torso because we needed them to create leverage and create a big arch. Chipping is all about accuracy and precision and control and consistency. So, we're not trying to hit this seven iron 180 yards, we're trying to hit it seven yards. The requirements for this shot are very different.

                            What I want to show you first is what so many amateur golfers struggle with and what they do wrong when they chip is they try to do it all with just their arms and hands. What we see all the time is stuff like this where the right arm bends a lot, the left arm bends a lot. Even in a chip shot it's easy to start seeing a lot of pushing motion because so often we'll see this left arm breaking down into a chicken wing like you see in the full swing. The cause is exactly the same. That's the beauty of the Rotary Swing stuff, you can start looking at cause and effect relationships and understanding where movement is coming from, which part of your body and it creates the same look from the other side. If I bend my right arm a lot and try to push through really hard, my left arm is going to be bent. You'll notice that my chest is still pointing at you.

                            So now, I'm really relying on my coordination and my hand/eye coordination with my right hand to hit the ball. What happens more often than not is that people, because this right arm allows you to push down, makes the club continue to travel on a tangent down and allows you to do this, which is the most embarrassing thing in the world. You've just hit two shots 400 yards and now this next shot to hit it seven yards, it takes you three more attempts because you keep laying the sod over it. There is no reason to do that.

                            If you understand what you're really trying to do with a chip shot, what the requirements are, then this is going to make this shot really easy. So, what are the requirements really that we are trying to do? Number one, we actually want a really shallow angle of attack. I want you to think of the bottom of your chipping stroke like this, not like this. Think of an airplane coming in to land. We want to come in nice and shallow like that. You don't want to be dropping straight to the ground and have to pull up really quick. That's what you're doing when you chip with your right hand instead of learning how to chip the way I'm going to show you in just a moment.

                            The first thing, understanding requirements. We want that club to come through really shallow and to be relatively upright with the shaft and address. This is another major mistake that people make all the time and a lot of instructors teach this, to actually set the ball way back in your stance and get a ton of shaft lean and turn this seven iron into a three iron. Now, think about what's happening here, what you're forcing yourself to do is bring that airplane down really steep and you're going to risk yourself laying the sod over it. You don't want a lot of shaft lean at address or at impact in a chipping shot. That's a fallacy. I'm not saying you can't do that but you're going to tend to chunk it all the time.

                            What we want is a shaft that's pretty upright. Now, what this does is it builds in margin of error. Nobody's perfect, especially in golf, we're all going to make mistakes all the time. What we want to do is mitigate the results of that mistake by building in a big margin of error. If I come down really steep, I have to hit that ball just perfect or I'm going to hit the ground first. Or, hit the ball and not the ground and come down too steep and blade it, which is another embarrassing shot, to blade one across the green. What we want is to come in really shallow so that even if I do get a little bit of grass between the club face and the ball, I'm still not going to lay the sod over it.

                            I'm going to use the bounce of the club effectively so that it's going to keep the leading edge from digging into the turf. If the leading edge digs into the turf that's when bad stuff happens. The leading edge digs into the turf when your angle of attack toward the ground is too steep and the leading edge hits the ground before the trailing edge. We actually want that trailing edge to do it's job. It's designed to hang below the leading edge for a reason. It's to protect you from the club digging too deeply.

                            So, how do we do that? First off, we've got to make some setup adjustments. When you're chipping, what I want you to do is get comfortable with the ball being more up in your stance. What is that going to do to my setup? I'm still going to have some shaft lean but I don't need 30 degrees, 20 degrees of shaft lean, that's way too severe. So now, as I have a little bit of shaft lean and I rock my shoulders back and forth, you'll notice that I'm going to come through the grass really clean and really shallow. I'm not going to be taking any dirt. I have no risk of ever chunking this shot. That's where the Connect starts to really come in handy, is that as I put this in I can start to feel the mechanics of the shot, not just the setups.

                            Now, as I put the Connect in I want you to move it up to your chest, where the bar is touching your chest so it's going to be very high on your arms and what I want you to practice, at first without a club and even with your arms across your chest, is moving the Connect back and forth like this. Again, the opposite of what you're doing in a full swing because again, the requirements are different. We don't need power. We actually want our chest to rock back and forth because that's really the primary mover of the golf club in the chipping stroke only. Different set of requirements so it's going to be a little different than what you do in a full swing. Rotate my chest back, think about rotating the bar back, rotate the bar back to impact, bend in the release.

                            Now, with the club, the club makes it not any different, right? I've gone back, impact, release. All done by just focusing on the core movement of moving the Connect back and forth so that my arms and chest stay in sync. If I start moving my arms all over the place independent of my chest, the bar is going to start sliding against my chest. I don't want the bar moving its relationship to my chest. I'm just moving the bar back and forth and everything else is staying the same. Now, when I come out to hit a chip shot, ball a little bit more up on my stance versus having an open stance like this and really slamming the club shot, or delofting it. Now all I have to do is rock my shoulders back and through and hit a perfect, simple little chip shot.

                            My hands didn't do anything, my arms didn't do anything. I just focused on moving this Connect back and forth. It makes it so much easier because now I don't have to worry about whether or not I'm gonna blade it or worry about whether or not I'm gonna chunk it because I'm not adding any angles. If I, all of a sudden set my wrist really hard, move my arm, bend my arm, now I've got all these angles that I've got to get rid of in a short period of time. It's too difficult to time that and get consistent contact. We want to take all those variables out, rock our shoulders back and forth. Simple little chip shot every time. So, practice with the Connect. You can do this indoors. You don't need to be out here hitting balls. Practice with just the Connect and get the feeling of your chest rotating back and rotating through and watch your chipping improve dramatically.

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Devon
On the chip shots what am I supposed to do with my legs and hips? I feel like I am either swinging my arms, which is wrong because I’m not connected to my chest, or I’m turning my hips through and through.
April 30, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Devon. You can use your legs a little. You don't need a big weight transfer, or post up for power. But, softer to make it fluid and feel based. Take a look at Master the Golf Chipping Stroke.
April 30, 2021
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Bernd
Hi. I just started with the RST system and am working my way up through it. I started with putting and am currently working on my chipping. In the meantime, I am also working on re-designing my regular swing. Anyhow, in regards to chipping: there is no release. Am I correct in this? The club face is (as far as I Unterstand it) just moved by the chest.... Do I get this right? and: I love your approach, as I for the first time understand certain things my Pro was trying to teach me. Keep on with this great work!
February 12, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Bernd. You can have some rotation in the face to keep the strike shallow. But, there won't be a massive release like a full swing and you are using more of the body to help square the face rather than a big arm/hand move.
February 12, 2020
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Mohnishkumar
Hi, How do we start taking the club back . Eg. In iron swing we start the swing by moving obligue and sholder blade . Shall we do the same with the chipping as well?? Thanks
February 2, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Mohnishkumar. Take a look at My Golf Backswing Secrets Video. You can use weight shift, or obliques/glide to initiate first move in a stock swing. We find it easier when players trigger their swing with weight. Chipping won't have a lot of weight movement and will be more of the core/glide.
February 3, 2020
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Thomas
I had been having inconsistencies in my chipping lately. I dug out my rotaryconnect and started doing this drill and my chipping improved greatly, great video. Also, if you add a little wrist hinge in the backswing, does this add backspin?
June 19, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Tom. Glad your chipping has improved. A little hinge may allow some more leverage for speed giving you greater spin. But, it won't necessarily add more backspin just due to added hinge.
June 19, 2019
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Mohnishkumar
Hello , As clay said , we need to do hinge aur bow during swing. But now , you are saying that you should not do any wrist motion . So, my question is when we have to hinge and when we dont have to?? Thank you
June 1, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Mohnishkumar. During a pitch shot you will have a little more wrist set/hinge. But, for basic chipping techniques the wrists will be much more quiet because it is a much shorter shot and lower flight.
June 2, 2019
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richard
do I use just my right hand only,,, like chuck , my left just sits on top can you make a video on tough shots around the green and talk about how these shots come out with speed and 25 feet would be a good shot. when the pressure is on...do I play a safe shot
November 5, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Richard. Thanks for the suggestion. I will relay to the team. Others are killer in a golf round. You have to gauge the risk reward. Sometimes bogey is the smart play. Leave yourself with a chance to two putt and get out of there. Nothing is worse than two chips followed by 3 putts. Experiment with using the trail hand to slide under and control the spin. Both hands/arms have a role, but you will have much more feel using the trail to slide under the ball.
November 5, 2018
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richard
on my course around the green, the ball is sitting just off the green in a secondary rough where you have grass short and choppy, pin is close, I'M trying to float the ball out SOFTLY I'M USING a bump and run shot with my wedge, but the ball gets on the green and, not a blade runs across the green,
November 5, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Richard. Allow for the face to be slightly more open and you need to hit more of a pitch out of the grass. A little more wrist set to help the wedge chop it out of the grass more. Allow for more wrist and steeper attack angle to pop the ball out.
November 5, 2018
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richard
I understand, but it's a tight lie, do I still want to add a steep attack, there a bare spot between the grass where the ball sits
November 5, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Richard. I thought you were meaning a little more sitting down type lie. Take a look at How to Chip - Spinning Chip Shots.
November 5, 2018
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David
I have been told that i can stand up on even chip shots leading to a bladed shots. Can you recommend any drills to stop this?
September 18, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello David. Have you been reported to pick up your head and everything follows suit? Head down until the ball is long gone.
September 21, 2017
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timothy
Thanks chris. If I understand this correctly, a pitch is a chip with an added wrist wrist action so that this "chip" will become a pitch enabling the ball to go further. Am I correct?
August 6, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Timothy. Yes, you are on the proper track. The chip needs to be a shorter, lower and more controlled flight. The pitch is a larger version with more wrist to have a higher flight and more carry yardage.
August 7, 2017
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timothy
Thanks Craig, that helps me a lot. I now understand the difference, and can now be more relaxed when confronting a chip vs. pitch decision.
August 7, 2017
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timothy
When you chip, you keep your hands quiet in the backswing. When you pitch, you bend your right wrist. My question: at what point does a chip become a pitch, or a pitch becomes a chip? Are all chips within 5 yards of the green? 10 yards?
August 6, 2017
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hi Timothy, this sort of question is based on "feel". You want to practice and play around with distances to best determine the technique that will work for you within the required distance.
August 6, 2017
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dennis
Where do you put your weight and how much in the bump and run chip shot.
July 17, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dennis. Stock chip (bump and run) weight will be on the lead side with 70/30 lead to trail side dispersion.
July 17, 2017
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Dan
Craig, at about 5:30 in the video, Chuck says the move is just the opposite of what we want to do in the full swing. Isn't what he's demonstrating just the same as the take away move which actually starts the full swing?
July 16, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dan. You are correct. The rotation of the shoulders for the takeaway will remain the same as above. Chuck is more referring to the follow through that the chest rotates unlike how when you release a full swing shot.
July 16, 2017
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John
Wow ! here is another reason why I am so happy I bought my Rotary Connect from you. I have been focusing so much on my long game that my short game is suffering. This will help immensely ! I love the fact that it will reduce the margin of error. Thank you so much ! Please continue to show us other ways of utilising this fantastic training aid. John Mc - Western Australia
July 16, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello John. Thanks for the post. Glad you are enjoying your Rotary Connect.
July 16, 2017
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Loran
Will this rotary connect tool help me open up my hips in the follow through swing? I am trying to achieve the momentum of the pull my arms around my body type move? I feel this swing aid device will help me stop from pushing off my right foot? In all, will the rotary connect tool help with lag, shift, sitting and squatting?
November 21, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Loran. The Connect will help with push off of the trail leg. It won't necessarily force you to open the hips, but if you perform properly it will follow its function. The Connect will help keep the arms better in front of the body and with shift/squatting. Lag should be a product of those proper moves. For chipping, the lead arm won't swing very far through the shot a will feel more down the line than around the body.
November 21, 2016
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Thomas
I would love to find a rotary connect tool if you have any
September 4, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Thomas. We should still have a few in the Training Aids Section.
September 4, 2015
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Robert James
Should the rotary connect be used in practicing Chuck's video on hitting proper pitch shots where you want some wrist hinge to get spin and loft? Thanks
August 27, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Bob. You can use it. However, when it comes to pitching and chipping you need to use some feel. It might make it feel too technical for you.
August 27, 2015

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