Overview of the Push Release

An overview to the push release for those who want to use the right side to help power their golf swings and still hit world class, effortless golf shots.

64x64
Asle
A push release - is that done by golfers who earlier were called hitters? When making a punch shot - is this somewhat similar in the way this is done?
July 27, 2022
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Asle. Yes. Except in a punch shot you may see a little more of a body release.
July 27, 2022
64x64
richard
she plays off her tippie toes
July 26, 2022
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Richard. She definitely has attended to keep the weight too forward towards the toes.
July 27, 2022
64x64
Haseeb
Why not go Lefty and learn a pull release with your right hand if you are too right have dominant?
April 20, 2021
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Hasseb. You can do that. We have discussed this in depth under a few videos. The main point is switching later in life is more arduous then you would think. Getting someone to hit it straight isn't the issue. But, changing the basic kinetic chain someone has created since a child to produce power is difficult to re-learn.
April 21, 2021
64x64
Haseeb
Where can I find the subsequent drills and videos?
April 7, 2021
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Haseeb. Take a look at the Tape Drill for right now. We are releasing more about the push release in the next couple of months with the release of Axiom.
April 8, 2021
64x64
Haseeb
Would you recommend this for trail side dominant players? Ex tennis player here with right side issues
April 7, 2021
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Haseeb. The choice will be up to you. Players who don't want to take the time to retrain to lead side dominance typically go the trail side push route.
April 8, 2021
64x64
steven
to chuck: thanks for posting this video.... it has been the most helpful video for me of all the videos on the website ! ... I have always had some problems with the roll release style of swing.... it always seemed to me that the upper body and lower body were fighting each other, with the lower body trying to post up on the left leg with some opening of the hips.... which was happening at the same time as the attempt to keep the upper body and shoulders closed so that I could move to a lag on the downswing to a roll release starting just before P6..... now, with this push type of release, I feel like i can rotate as fast and freely as I like with both my hips and my chest and shoulders as long as I keep my right wrist bent backwards to and through impact and as long as I keep my left forearm above my right forearm through impact.... I am not having a problem slicing the ball with this technique.... I tend to hit a draw with my irons and a straight shot with my driver.... i realize that the push type of release might be harder on the back with the push release compared to the roll release.... maybe I can avoid back pain by doing a little less right lateral bend toward the ball through impact..... at any rate, I love the push type of release.... thanks for making the video of this alternative way of making the golf swing...... steven vig https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-sZjisnYWS0 here is a video I make for youtube
March 20, 2021
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Steven. Thanks for the kind words. Chuck is slammed right now. I don't believe he has the time to dedicate to watching the video. I will reach out to you if he has a chance. Or, I will give you my 2 cents. Remember, the push release won't be drastically different in positions from the DEAD Drill. Make sure you aren't rotating you body so hard through the shot it is more the body squaring the club versus the proper trail hands/wrist motion.
March 23, 2021
64x64
steven
thanks craig.... i am sure that i am not overdoing it on the rotation... in fact i think i need to rotate more, get better lag, and post up on the left leg earlier than I am doing.... my contact is more solid but i need to do all three of those things more than i am currently doing it... steven vig
March 23, 2021
64x64
Scott
Brilliant video! I'm unclear on the idea of "clearing the hips" in relationship to "driving the right hip forward." When you say clearing the hip are you referring to the right or left hip? It seems like driving the right hip would potentially get in the way of the arms. I'm confused on that point. Also relating this to the DEAD Drill, should I be making any changes such as driving the right hip if I want to do a push release? In the DEAD drill I'm trying to move the left hip out of the way...should I change that focus? Thanks.
January 30, 2021
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Scott. Lead hip is clearing the way. The trail hip has to make room for the trail arm to work in front.
February 1, 2021
64x64
charles
I have a good swing when using my left arm only. Problems like shanking come when I add the right hand. Chuck uses Fred Couples and Vijay Singh as examples of Pros who have a left arm dominant swing and they "release the right hand", When I heard that, I was thinking they literally take their right hand off the grip. But, watching their swing, I see their right hand is still on the club during the follow-through. Can you please elaborate on what Chuck means when saying they "release the right hand"?
November 26, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Charles. Take a look at the Vijay Release Drill. Their trail hand does start to come off the club. Not actively pushing it through the impact zone.
November 30, 2020
64x64
adam
Rewatching - and I’m sure this will be covered in future drills - but is the first part (right hip push) a push toward the target or toward the ball? I assume the former, but just want to be sure I understand.
November 14, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Adam. Think about it as being more rotational. The drills will go much more in depth, but I would go with the former as well.
November 15, 2020
64x64
David
Chuck, I really appreciate what you are doing in researching so many areas of the golf swing. I am relatively new to the game of golf, but have been an active sports person my whole life. I have struggled taking the arms out of my swing, but this seems like an area that will help me to find the right balance of right side strength but focused on the sequence you suggest in the rocket ship analogy. I am drawn to your style of instruction because of the science and explanation you put behind it. Please keep up the great work and hope that pinky heals quickly. Thanks, David
November 14, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello David. Thanks for the post. Our pleasure to keep studying and providing the best quality instruction.
November 14, 2020
64x64
Shawn
Chuck, I am so right sided dominant I should walk in circles. Does fireplug humping cause a steep downswing?
November 13, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Shawn. Typically, to much trail hip push and lateral drive will cause you to get under plane. Most trail side pushers with the upper half will be steep. Not saying you can't have early extension and come over the top however.
November 14, 2020
64x64
Thomas
Looks like a classic right arm flying wedge as described by Homer Kelly in his book The Golfing Machine, 6-B-3-0-1. Love your explanation. Tom, North Carolina
November 12, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Thomas. Glad you like the explanations. More to come.
November 13, 2020
64x64
Diane
I'm sure this works when doen properly, but it sounds like the very opposite of what you have taught us so far with 5 step and DEAD Drill. Whan I first started playing 4 years ago, a range session left me with an achey back, because I was doing it wrong. Since practising the Dead Drill I now have no such problems. I also know a tall, young 4 handicapper who plays in a lot of competitions and swings exactly like this, and after watching this I now understand that he is totally trailside dominant and is doing push release. We have had several interesting discussions and demos in the garden when I show him what I'm learning with RST and he keeps on about driving with the right hip. He also has a permanent back injury . . .
November 12, 2020
64x64
Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
Not opposite at all but i totally understand how it would seem that way. I will clarify some things in the next video based in the questions being raised
November 12, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Diane. This is totally optional. No need to change to this release. There are many different factors you can tweak to help reduce side bend, shoulders, etc.. which will be discussed further. If you have success and enjoy the free swinging lead side dominant motion. No necessary need to change.
November 12, 2020
64x64
Diane
It looks like the whole downswing is different, not just the release. Do you have to be lead or trail dominant, or is there a middle road? I'm right handed but haven't played any racquet sports and started with RST when I started playing golf at age 58 so I don't think I've got a massive side dominance to start with. I'm focused on training my left side but if my right side can safely add some consistency then that woyks be good. I'll keep watching as I know the explanation will be solid.
November 12, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Diane. To stay with being lead side dominant. You will have very little involvement of the trail side. Chuck will go further into the blend. Do's and don'ts.
November 12, 2020
64x64
Nick
CHUCK/CRAIG, MORE PLEASE! Totally understand everyone’s confusion. Here is my understanding of what Chuck is trying to do and he or Craig can confirm or correct. Everything we have been taught in RST has the end goal of safely putting us in a position to properly release the club (and then releasing it correctly). This includes weight on lead side, hips cleared, shoulders square, lag preserved. To this point, this has been taught using exclusively the lead side. What they are trying to do is figure out a way that we can properly use our trail side muscles to obtain the same conditions for those of us (myself included) that do not have the strength and/or coordination to do it with only the lead side without messing the whole thing up. I am a 1 handicap and am now getting my body into positions and hitting shots that I never have because without using my trail side, those positions just weren’t going to happen (particularly getting my hips open). My lead side alone couldn’t get me there so my trail side would instinctively try to make up for it and mess everything up. So, at the end of the day the end-goal positions are kind of exactly the same as what they have always taught.
December 5, 2020
64x64
Carver
Spent an hour trying this out on Trackman this afternoon. some very interesting metrics: club to path was 0.0; face angle -1.2, swing speed up, contact in middle of club face...the only negative was launch angle was very low with not enough height.
November 12, 2020
64x64
Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
Too much right arm too soon (steepening move) and not enough rotation (shallowing move).
November 12, 2020
64x64
Carver
copy that
November 12, 2020
64x64
Tom
Loved the video, very educational. I love how the swing is broken down. I am all about options. I am currently very happy with the progress I am making with Craig but if Craig suggested we call time and take a look at me using the right side more I would definitely do it. I have total faith in the RST system.
November 12, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Tom. If you are mastering what you should be right now. That trail side may already be DEAD .
November 12, 2020
64x64
Tom
Progress is the operative word, every once in a while the evil step brother shows up!!
November 12, 2020
64x64
adam
This is great. It took me a year to get feel a left side dominated swing and it works beautifully at the range but ancient instincts take over on the course. I really welcome this info as something to try - and think the idea of a more stable club face through impact is exciting - bad if it isn’t clearly better (especially under pressure), I’m happy to return to left-side dominant. Thanks so much for continuing to look for ways of making learning easier/faster!
November 12, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Adam. Thanks for the post. We will have some drills to help blend the motion for you. Always have that lead in the bag.
November 12, 2020
64x64
Charl
Blame this on Covid! The fact that Chuck has now been house-bound with a high speed camera has had problematic consequences - a total drift away from the "Fundamentals" that has made RST so worthwhile. Firstly, high speeds camera work has been around 50 years or more, and almost in all instances, the wrong conclusions were drawn. The golf swing is so fast that positional analysis tend to get it wrong. ESPECIALLY, if the Tigers and Brooks and other similar Pros are analysed and offered as role models. The Amateur swing is miles off this scale and the "solutions" offered tend to be unhelpful. Secondly, Chuck has suddenly drifted off his usual style of "THIS is the recipe" and he has become wishy washy. High hands ok. Low hands ok. Left arm pull ok. Right hand push ok. (Especially if you like chicken wings). Whatever melts your butter..... This new work is so dangerous and inconclusive that I would suggest that a new website is dedicated to it. The RST fundamentals that has worked for me: 1. Weight shift on back sswing, one inch to the right heel. 2. Shoulder turn without moving the right knee - the chair drill is essential here. 3. Weight shift and clearing the lower body best illustrated by one of the latest tips - "throw a ball at the ball". 4. Turn the arms off - they merely transfer action to the hands. Let the shoulders move the arms. 5. Hand and wrist action in sequence with shoulder turn.
November 11, 2020
64x64
Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
Darn Covid! Thanks for expressing your concerns Charl. Let me clarify a couple and then will be sure to address others in an upcoming video. First, literally nothing has changed. I'm trying to find a safe way to help golfers who's left hand and left side of the body is a foreign entity to them. Golf is hard, having to learn to dominate the swing the side of the body most people have never even realized was there can be even harder. Does that mean those golfers who aren't as naturally gifted or experienced athletically just have to suffer playing crap golf until they train the left side properly? Perhaps that's just how it is, but if I can research another way and find evidence to support the safety of it, then I will. Also keep in mind that even with this release change, nothing has really changed. I've researched adding more right side rotation, most golfers do this anyway and we all do to some degree as rotation is done from both sides of the body. I'm trying to find just how much right arm can be added before the spine is forced into more rotation that i'm not a fan of and that will be the limiting factor there. Hogan wanted to really drive hard with the right side and hand and that got his body very open and that I'm not a big fan of. Lastly, realize this is all just research. I think so many "ideas" about the swing have just been accepted as fact based on observation, and not what's actually truly happening. The only way to know that for sure is to experience it yourself by learning the movement patterns so you really know what's actually happening and then measure the results.
November 12, 2020
64x64
David
I personally love this. I love everything RST but release was where it got problematic. I love the idea that rst will have a couple different options. This is a release that is absolutely used by so many pros these days!
November 12, 2020
64x64
Bernie
Please help me golf gods and you too, Chuck. I was introduced to you a couple of years ago and greatly appreciated your simple, consistent approach to learning/improving golf. You made me a believer of the pull vs push understanding of the golf motion. I have worked hard through the DEAD drills fighting off my right-side dominance to my swing. I completed not one, but two Boot Camps experiencing graduated successes.......NOW, the right (trail) arm-side release swing????!!!! Give me strength.... I cannot do that at this point. I can't thank you enough for all of your interest/concern in helping all of us, but I am going to stay with your DEAD drill approach to the swing....but thank you anyway.
November 11, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Bernard. This is an option and completely not required. You don't have to switch at all. Swinger vs. Hitter. The choice is yours. If you have trained the lead side to be dominant. Fear not. You will be fine staying that way.
November 11, 2020
64x64
Chris
Is a push release still a safe swing on the back ?
November 11, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Chris. The shoulders will be square or still very close to it. All depends on how you package it together. If you over cook the move you will have the potential to create too much side bend. There will be drills to help the move be preformed as safely as possible.
November 11, 2020
64x64
Chris
Would you like me to work on this for my next review submission?
November 11, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Chris. Let some more details come out. I like where your swing is currently.
November 12, 2020
64x64
charles
Chuck, my 73rd birthday is this month. Thanks for the birthday gift! One of the best I have ever recieved. This right hand dominant swing FEELS so much more natural to me. I haven't hit any balls yet, but I'm so excited, I just couldn't wait to thank you. Looking forward to the next video. -Chip
November 11, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Charles. You're most welcome and much appreciate the thanks.
November 11, 2020
64x64
William
I am a 15 handicap but I am athletic with good hand eye coordination. I have attended the boot camp and practiced the DEAD drill for awhile but I don't have the time to fully commit and want to have fun playing golf and get better. I am definitely right side dominant from playing baseball many years and my muscle memory works that way. This looks like it could be great for me and enable me to get better very quickly. Looking forward to more! Thank you!!
November 11, 2020
64x64
William
Some drills focused on getting the shoulder to commit before the hands would be helpful.
November 11, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello William. We will have lots of drills, etc.. coming out exploring the new topic. This is just the introduction of what you will be tackling
November 11, 2020
64x64
William
Fantastic. Thank you!
November 11, 2020
64x64
Andrew
You probably couldn't hear me screaming at my computer screen while I was watching this, but it feels like you've made this specifically for me. I am on the front end of a six month offseason and had been planning to hit the drills hard over the winter and try to overcome this right side dominance that I struggled with all summer. I had a horrible golf season and had to stop worrying about score, otherwise I would have quit. Deep down, I knew it was going to be a long shot this winter to try to train it out of me. This gives me hope there is an option to use my natural tendencies and still play decent golf. By the way, as a Canadian it's nice to see you featuring Brooke Henderson. She is a national treasure for us.
November 11, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Andrew. Thanks for the post. Glad to read you think there is some hope for future golf!
November 11, 2020
64x64
Keith
Hmm. Looking at Brooke Henderson’s position just after release, surely there is a ton of pressure on her spine? Is the push release really just for people who can’t master the left side only swing?
November 11, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Keith. The push release is a different way to approach trying to hit quality shots. Yes, over cooking the move can put more stress on the spine. Some players get stuck in golf purgatory with their trail side dominance. The research and discussion is another way at looking how you can utilize that dominance.
November 11, 2020
64x64
Marc
I am anxious to try tomorrow to see if I can hit balls this way with more speed. I am a slow swinger today and have been looking for this answer to get decent ball speed! Makes sense. To better fit with your basic concepts in all your other videos, I suggest you refer to this as an "advanced technique" called "thrust release". The word push should never be used as it goes against so much of your basics taught elsewhere. Like the 3 stage rocket analogy, and also suggest you only refer to stage 3 as Right hand THRUST. (Never say push, unless in a bad way!) Also would suggest that the into quotes some data on results for using this advanced technique. Thanks again! Exciting stuff!
November 10, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Marc. Thanks for the info Marc and sharing your thoughts. We are looking for reports back on what our members think.
November 11, 2020
64x64
Marc
I tested this morning in my hitting bay and adding this to the dead drill basics seemed to work OK / good. Need to see more videos to better understand the exact recommended timing with the post up movement. It did feel more natural / athletic and I've very encourage to test next on the practice range. By the way, Chuck referred to this as a space shuttle acceleration. Space shuttle has no rockets. Would be good to refer to this as the SpaceX rocket although that only has 2 stages........ Thanks
November 11, 2020
64x64
Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
The primary boosters are called SRB’s. Solid ROCKET boosters! Just sayin’!
November 11, 2020
64x64
David
Thanks for the video and for continuing to work to find the optimal swing sequence. Can you please clarify how this right hip driven move is different from posting up? When I squeeze the cheeks to post up, that activates both the right and left sides of the hip to help clear them for the arms and hands to release. Is this a different move or a just a different way of explaining the post up. Thanks.
November 10, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello David. We will have more drills explaining how the actual technique is performed. The posting up in a lead side dominant move is fully controlled by the lead side. Even though you squeeze the cheeks that is to help stabilize the hips to maximize energy transfer. This method the trail hip has to be much more active initially to reach said release position.
November 11, 2020
64x64
Kyaw Thet
I think it will be very difficult for me to switch back to this method because now I am used to the DEAD Drill with 5 minutes to perfect release drill using left hand only after doing thousands of reps.
November 10, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Kyaw. No worries at all. This is another way for players to look at the swing. With what you have accomplished from reviews (since I've seen your move). I think you are perfectly fine staying lead side dominant swinger.
November 11, 2020
64x64
Matthew
I like the thought and concept of this and for a person who has done boot camp and been a member for a long time it's hard to change my thoughts here. But I'm a person who struggles with being able get hips open at impact and I tried to implement this a little. I wouldn't say I felt effortless but using my right side get the hips open doors seem to help better than trying to work dead drill and only using left side to pull. With that being said is this something where you can utilize done concepts and blend the two so that you are cognizant of club face control. My fear is leading me to you much right side bend by over doing it and getting back issues. What are your thoughts on that? I was hitting my 8 iron quite solid with this somewhat blended approach to just assist in the hips open.
November 10, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Matt. If you over cook the move yes you can put more stress on the spine. If you stay lead side dominant as Chuck relayed you have to keep the trail side pretty much passive. We will have drills talking about the blend pros/cons to both.
November 11, 2020
64x64
Ronald
I have always been a right sided player and struggled to feel comfortable with the squat to square and post up moves. I just couldn’t feel relaxed with a left side dominated swing. I am looking forward to this new stuff as it might be just what I have been needing
November 10, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ronald. Great. Glad you are looking forward to the new drills/content.
November 10, 2020
64x64
Kerry
This right hip and right shoulder drive is totally contradictory to everything I have learned from your previous lessons. Prior to this video it was The lead left side leading the swing with the weight shift And left hip posting up allowing the arms to drop into place and release the club. The right hip right shoulder were an afterthought and moved with gravity. Now it has become the engine to the swing. Which one is it?
November 10, 2020
64x64
Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
Searching for proof with data and trying to help those who are very right side dominant play better golf very fast. The pros get it done all sorts of ways and this is just but another but you can tons of others doing it very differently. The golf swing has been evolving since the very beginning and with all the incredibly precise measuring equipment today why not start seeking for answers to the most optimal way to swing the club that is easy and fast to learn for the average person
November 10, 2020
64x64
Kerry
Fast and easy does not work for the golf swing. Five step program bedrails 3000 repetitions will help build a strong base for a good golf swing. I’ve played golf for 60 years. 55 of them were fire the left hip and drive the right shoulder. When I was young strong and athletic I can make this work. If you’re fortunate enough to not hurt yourself or growing older and swinging this way the consistency and hitting the ball square, straight and online immediately goes away. Your program creates a swing that hits the ball straight, solid and consistent. The fact that is effortless and you don’t Feel like you’ve been in a tackle football game when completed with the round of golf is another advantage. I watch the young kids on the range being taught the hard rotation with the shoulders and the hips. They hit the ball a long way But generally not online And very seldom two shots in route.
November 10, 2020
64x64
Marc
So this seems like a big change from boot camp dead drill square shoulders at impact. Should I abandon that post up square shoulders approach and follow this new approach? How to resolve conflicting instruction? Thanks and please keep up the great work!
November 10, 2020
64x64
Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
This is all just a test to see if this can help a lot of people i see struggle and about finding the optimum way to for the average joe to play great golf. Check out my reply to kerry for a little more
November 10, 2020
64x64
Craig
Is there a preference of which swing for the short game? This release looks to me to be more in line with your 60+ yard wedge videos.
November 10, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Craig. A penetrating wedge will tend to be a little more of a body release , than a arms hands. The hands will tend to be quieter.
November 10, 2020
64x64
Richard
Wow. This is very different. Is it as safe on the spine? Does it provide as much power as the lead arm release against a stopped body? Is the tush line as important? Do you recommend this over the way Rotary has been taught for the last few years? Trying to digest all of this. Lots of it makes tons of sense.
November 10, 2020
64x64
Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
Precisely what i am trying to measure. For me having a very bad back will be a good test. But I can’t solely let my body or what i see personally on thr force plates be the judge so that’s why i am looking for feedback from those who struggle with the left side to see how it performs for them and how their body feels. My finger is healing up enough i should be able to start testing myself again next week and will start sharing the swing catalyst data from this and other swings for comparison once i have this movement pattern down enough
November 10, 2020
64x64
Robert
To still obtain the advantage of a strong right side push while avoiding injury ,if one feels the right shoulder "high" going through the strike, can you avoid the common disk damage of turning the spine while tilted to the side?
November 10, 2020
64x64
Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
The issue with that is swing mechanics issues. Ie plane steep, path going hard left, steep AoA etc. You can do a lot of subtle things to reduce the side bend though such as adding a little more left side pull, earlier right arm extension etc
November 10, 2020
64x64
Richard
Seems as if Rahm was only slightly open with the shoulders. I'm still not 100% clear on the ideal positions, but it seems as if driving the hips open, then right shoulder against the open hip post up to a nearly square position, then finally right arm in a relaxed, lag releasing fashion would preserve most of the no-side bend part of regular RST. Trying to over-cook it, kill it, or really get after it would be the side bend we see on some of those guys, and also require a hell of a lot of coordination to get right. Is this close to what you've been thinking?
November 11, 2020

Right. So before we start diving deep, let's take a look at the big picture of how you would start altering your golf swing to take advantage of the side that's been causing you so much trouble and speed up the learning process and start adding some power to your swing. So what is it really, again, that most golfers struggle with it's this right side dominant stuff, doing things the wrong way at the wrong time, with the right side of the body. For most golfers, it really stems from tension in this right shoulder and this right arm. Most golfers, the average golfer cast the club. They start coming over the top. And this is again, all right, side dominant stuff. That's used incorrectly. Now you still can't do that stuff. No matter what you do, you can't push the shaft with your right arm. You can't cast the club, you can't throw the club away.

And all those things you have to have you know, your swing sequence correctly. But by leveraging the right side of the body to get the right arm to get in the right position, then you can start to think about adding some right arm speed in there as you feel like you, you want to do so. But the bigger thing first is understanding kind of like this three-stage rocket is how I kept thinking about it in my head. If you're going to use the right side and you're going to be dominant with that right side to a degree, you have to get the sequencing of this thing, right? And it's easy to do. It's very easy to do it. I'm going to make it really simple for you to understand, but I want you to think about it in terms of a three-stage rocket stage.

One of the rocket is still always your hips, just like we talked about in the dead drill. The only thing that's going to be different is we're going to use a lot more right side hip drive. Now this is important because as you start understanding, what's going to happen with the arms and swing. I'm going to show you what happens in a left side, dominated release versus a right side push release. You're gonna see the knee that the hips really have to do a lot of work. The right hip, especially has to do a lot of work initially to avoid flipping or creating a steep angle of attack. So stage one, right hip stage two, right shoulder. And this is also very important. Again, if we're going to add some right hand in the bottom, which you don't even have to with this, this is an optional thing, and it's really going to be more for stronger players, but I'm going to talk about how, if you're a, you know, a female who isn't very strong and doesn't have very strong arms or wrists, how you don't need to use your right arm at all, but you do need to use the first two stages of this rocket undoubtedly right.

Hip right shoulder. The last stage of the right rocket is then this pushing or thrusting motion. And I hate the description of pushing because it makes you start to want to think, like really shoving this club down, SKU steep and your angle of attack, or cause you to get your divot too far ahead. It's not like that at, but there's no better way that I can think of how to describe it. Cause it does look like more of a pushing motion. And we're going to look at some tour pros swings at the end of this video that are going to walk you through what that looks like in, in some really, really great ball strikers movements. So, but let's first understand how this three-stage rocket goes together when you're going to be lead side dominant and how that differs from being, or excuse me, when you're gonna be trail side dominant versus lead side dominant the lead side dominant side of the thing.

Obviously we're going to make a big turn because we need a lot of body rotation, a load up a lot of big muscles so that our arms don't have to do much, which is still going to be similar to what we're going to do. It's just not going to be using the right arm. We shift and we turn our hips, but not a lot of right side drive. We shouldn't need that in a lead side, dominated swing. We're going to use our left legs or excuse me, our left side of our body, our hips, less out of our body to pull the club through and let it release nice and easy. My hips get to chill out a little bit more, especially the right hip in that movement pattern. However, when we start wanting to be able to add some right side into this and avoid the club flipping over or digging down steep divots, then the movement pattern needs to change a bit.

So instead, now we're going to still same thing shifting over to the left, but now I'm going to take my right hip and turn it. And this is one of the biggest things that you'll see in tour pros. Nowadays, they have a massive amount of hip rotation. Now, many of you are going to say, well, I'm not flexible enough to get my hip set Oakland. I get it. You're going to think that. But it's just because the way that you've been trying to get your hips open as why you haven't been able to do it because I'm certain, if you just stand here, you can get your hips very open. However, when you start firing this rocket in the wrong sequence, your hips won't have time to get open. And that's your biggest enemy in the golf swing, especially downswing is time. The reason that most golfers struggle is they don't get the swing sequenced in the right space of time.

There's only a quarter of a second to get everything that you're trying to do in the downswing. It's really, really fast. And if you're adding a lot of lateral movement, because you have a wider stance and then trying to turn and then throwing your arms, your hips just won't have physical enough time to rotate out of the way. So what you have to do is you have to shift your focus to be in getting this right hip, to come forward, to help rotate the left hip out of the way. Now I can see I've made a huge turn here by driving this right hip forward. You need this. When you're going to have the opportunity to add more right side in there is I'm going to show you so right. Hip has to come forward as the right hips coming forward. This initiates everything. Then my right shoulder can start to fire.

And now you'll notice a pretty big difference in the position of my arm. My right arm is going to maintain a lot more flection coming into impact. And this is the point where this last stage of the rocket can then fire to control the club face through the hitting area, to create more of a time path for the club to be straighter through the hitting area. Now, and I lead side release. We're not trying to get the club to work more down the target. And again, the club's still working on an arc. So some of these things are going to be really exaggerated just to help you see it. In fact, I'm going to use some drills with some tape to help you see what I did to create this movement pattern, to keep the cut face. Very, very quiet through the hitting area and take advantage of some physics principles that we're going to talk about in some other videos.

So right, hip right shoulder, they're all trying to outrun the club. If I stall out early with my hip turn and start to fire with my shoulders, what's going to happen. I'm going to start scooping and flipping. That's why your hip has to be out in front. Your right hip has to drive your right shoulder has to drive to stay in front of the club. And then it releases at the very end. Now, for those of you who are a little bit stronger and want to use some right side at this right arm, at this point, you can, and I'm going to show you some tour pros to do. And I'm going to show you some pros who don't, and there's a variation. And typically there's not necessarily one wrong or right way in doing this, but one was going to require more rotation and less arm strength.

And one's going to require more arm strength, arm and grip and hamstring and less rotation. So depending on how your body feels, how much rotational ability you have, how much flexibility you have and how your spine feels, this will dictate how much right arm release you have because as I come through, so I've got stage one of the rocket, right hip stage two, right shoulder. My shoulders are still coming in squared. This is going to be exaggerated because I'm obviously going slow. So my square shoulders and still be square at impact, but this is going to lead to more rotation and more side bed. The more I keep this right elbow from releasing this right arm from thrusting down the line. So if you're the type of person who has spine issues, back problems, things like that, you're, you may want to add some more right arm a little bit earlier so that as you get it's a right hip right shoulder.

And now I'm saying, well, I don't want to keep rotating. And I don't want to get into a lot of side Ben. So I'm going to let my right arm start to throw the club, drive it down the line. You can see the clubs taking a very S this is wouldn't happen at speed, but this is how you would be drilling to get that club face control using the right hand to help out with this. So the club face this staying very square and it's not rotating over very quickly in a lead arm release or lead side release. The club face has more inherent rotation. It's more natural for the club face to swing who rotate on this arc in turnover more so there's a little bit more inherent club face rotation through the hitting area, from my experience with it, versus what you can do with the right arm to help kind of drive and steer the club more down the line.

And that's why it's been termed a push release. Again, I don't really like that term. It's more of it's happening super fast. It's not this heavy push. It's more of a, you know, throwing the club a little bit and kind of guiding it down the line with a little bit of right arm thrust there, but it should be more quick and light and fast because your body should be moving fast. Not this hard, heavy push straight down to the ground. That's going to, again, lead to a very steep angle of attack, which is a no-no. So if you have the strength adding a little right arm, you can add some speed with this right arm at this point. Now, to do that though, again, your hip has to be out of the way and your shoulder has to be in front. Now, what happens if I don't do that?

Well, let's say my hips are only 20 degrees open and my shoulders are still pretty closed. And I add that right arm thrust. Well, look what happens the club face. It's either going to shove it way out to the right, which isn't gonna work, or what's more likely to happen is you're going to flip the face over with that right hand. That's why in a lead side, dominated swing, you don't really want to add right side right hand into it because it causes the club face to flip over too fast. When you use centrifical force to release the club, it just gets straightened out automatically for you and releases automatically for you. I'm not trying to do anything, literally just letting the club release at that point. But if I added right arm with that, my left arm is going to tuck in. My elbow is going to rotate in and the face is going to shut down and I'm timing a flip.

That's a very difficult way to play high-level golf. So that's why when your lead side dominant, you don't really add right side. You can do a little bit Freddie couples, that example really high hands, and you take that right arm. And he'd really tough that right. Elbow in and throw the club. But then he would let go with his right hand, right? VJ, Singh, Fred Freddie, Phil Mickelson. Another example of guys who make kind of longer language swings and use a little trailing arm to help get the clubs started down and shallow down from the top. But then they release it, right? That's where that drill comes from. Yes. You can add a little right arm, but you don't want to be and sustaining that force through the hitting area because you're going to flip the face over. Okay. Instead it's throwing it and letting it release.

That's what rotary swing is used. Preferably if you're going to add a little right arm again, it's more of a swinging motion than a pushing, hitting motion. And so that works totally fine. You just have to be mindful of not doing it the way Freddie did, because that really blew out his back. And I'll talk about that in another video. So long story short here, right? Hip right shoulder, right arm thrust. Now, if you're the type of person, doesn't really have very good arm strength, you know, if you're a little bit lighter, you know, smaller, a lot of women don't have the strength in their arms to really control the club face to the hitting area. How do you get that club face control? Because again, that was one of the requirements I want to have. You guys have absolute club face controlled and know where that ball is going every single time.

Not that you're not going to make mistakes, but as you start taking advantage of some of the things, the benefits that the push release has to offer and being right-side dominant has to offer not having to relearn you use the other side of your body and your brain then use slow down how much this club face is rotating. And I'm going to show you with John Rahm, who I think has a really phenomenal push release and how little club face rotation he has through the hitting area and give you some simple drills to start practicing this. You're going to see your club face control, go through the roof, especially if you've had no clue how to really properly release the golf club. And you've been struggling kind of mixing these components. Yeah. Okay. You're using your body and left side to pull, but then you add a lot of right arm flip in there, right?

And then you're like, gosh, that doesn't work. Well, those things are like oil and water. They're very difficult to blend together in a way that's going to lead to consistent success. So if you're on that other side of the scale, you don't have the physical strength to keep that club face. Going down that target line a little bit more with the right arm thrust. And again, it's not that the left arm is not doing anything. Of course the left hand is still in control that doesn't change, but the right arm starts to help out now and drive that down the line. Well, if you don't have that strength with the right arm, then what you do is you keep turning. So now, as I keep driving this right shoulder through the club face still has very little rotation on it. But this is of course increasing the amount of rotation in your body.

You can't have your cake and eat it too. When it comes to this stuff, you either add right arm thrust to help that club face, get that control of that push release, or you keep rotating this right shoulder through the ball to keep that club face from flipping over. Or of course you go the other side and just take the right arm out completely. But I'm assuming you're watching this because your right arm is the devil and you're wanting to figure out how can I use this right side of my body to control that club face? So this is, again, you can't have your cake and eat it too. If you're going to control that club face, you don't have the strength to do it with the right arm. Totally fine. You're just going to keep driving that right shoulder through a little bit more to help control the club face through the hitting area.

So it's going to look a little bit more like that. And from down the line or excuse me from up the line, you'll see, I'll use this swing catalyst logo as kind of my target. If I go left arm, only the club face still basically travels down the line, re leases back around to the left. But now as I'm practicing right side, I'm exaggerating driving that club, keeping the face square. And then we're going to talk about when we get into parametric acceleration, how this really to control the spin loft on the club to start giving you really, really monster shots with good height and trajectory with really great compression on it. So practice keeping the shaft D lofted that driving the right arm or driving the club through more with the right arm and keeping that club face more square. Now, if I do that, and then it releases right now, and again, these are all exaggerations.

These are drills to help you start kind of getting a concept of how a lead side release versus a trail side release is very different. So now let's say I don't have that strength to drive that club down, but I still want to have that good club face control and that stability through the hitting area. You add more rotation. And again, I'm going to hold it off for a second to show you the idea of the clubs, staying very, very, very square as long as I can. But in reality, at speed, it's still turning over, but I'm using my right hand, right shoulder more so to do that. So that's the first piece that you want to practice and see how you can get control of that club face again and get the clubs staying very stable through the hitting area. Because one of the biggest things that I think most right-side dominant players will get from this is understanding what that club is doing, what that club face is doing through the hitting area is so important. So now what I want to do is I'm gonna take a an example of a tour pro and we take John Ron, because I love what he's doing. And it will help get into some of the other deeper concepts of parametric acceleration and how to control the release and stabilize the club face and using the body to do this. So let's take a look at John Rahm's swing and just how amazingly simple his release through the hitting areas. That's led him to be one of the best ball strikers in the world.

Let's take a look at the swing of John rom. Now, now one of the things that you will see in him, he has a really excellent sequence for push release. And as I show you a couple of other players after John, you'll start to see how these things work together in ballplayers and golfers, who are using a push release who have a really, really good, simple mechanics swing. So the first thing we're gonna look at is that first stage, and this is one of the things that the tour pros do so well, and the amateurs struggle so mightily with, and that is getting that club to shallow out with hip motion. Now, in the case of a pusher, that's going to be right hip. So I want you to focus first on this right pocket on John, and then watch as he begins to drive that right hip forward.

That's the primary emotion after he sets into that left side. So if you look at his left foot here, pretty clear to see he's going to really get a lot of weight transferred onto that sitting into that left side. And then that right hip is going to begin to rotate and you can see his right glute, even pop out here pretty quick on the right side here, notice how he begins to turn and drive that right hip forward. That's getting that initial hip rotation to move the club and the arms. And as a result on the down the line view, you can see that his hands and the butt of the club, baby, basically travel straight down and begin to slowly arc out toward the ball. The average golfer begins to fire their arms immediately, and that drives their hands out in this direction. And that's what creates tons and tons of problems in the swing.

The trick to all of this. And when you're using a push release is to drive after you shift weight over to the left side, drive that right hip forward, and then the right shoulder. Now, if your left side pulling it's different, we've talked about how the club shallows out on the regular other videos on the site. So this is really just going to be focusing on the right side, push side motion, so right hip, and then watch us is once his right hip gets that initial motion going watch his right shoulder, then begin to drive down and through and forward toward the ball. This is critical for a push release because it allows that right arm to stay in reserve so that it releases very late. That is critical. So, yeah, you'll see, halfway down, John's right. Arm is still fully bent and it maintains that flection very late in the swing.

Then at this point, this is when the release happens. Now this is just millisecond right before the strikes. So there's not really a lot that you can consciously do to change a lot about what's going to happen in the golf swing at this point. So this is really been set up in motion by that right hip and right shoulder driving. And then the right arm begins it's to release. And you can see from face-on, there's obviously some pretty series, right arm extension going on there. And that's what allows him to create this very shallow and very simple angle of attack with a very stable club face, which is what I want to focus on next. So let's take a look face on and watch as the club works down. Now, one thing you'll note the balls a little bit further back in John's stance. This is common for right side pushers who are using the right side push release, because remember if you're lead arm, only if you take your right arm off the club, you'll probably notice if you've ever taken practice swings or hit balls that your bottom of your swing guard goes way forward.

And when you put the right arm on there, but it's not really doing a lot in the ball, the ball position moves back a little bit. This is where we talk about that left ear. In John's case, it's quite a bit further back and that's because he's using more right arm at this point in the release. And he may be trying to flight the ball down a little bit here, but in general, you'll see a ball position a little bit further back when you're using more right arm to release. But the big thing we want to talk about is how shallow the angle of attack is. And in most amateurs, especially if they have the ball back in the stance, they're digging a squirrel grave for a divot here, right? We don't see that in better ball strikers. They're very, very shallow. And in John's case, he does a unbelievably great job of having such a really wide, shallow bottom of his swing arc look a foot past impact almost if not, perhaps even more than that, it was close to a foot and the club shaft is still close to vertical.

The club face still pretty square. Obviously it's released a little bit. If you look back at where it was at impact, you can see a little bit more of the face, but there's not a ton of rotation there. The push release is what allows for this to be very shallow, like a plane coming in for a landing and maintain that shallow bottom of the arc for a long period of time. And that's the, my favorite thing about using the push releases. I was going through my testing and trying different things. This was one of the things that allowed me to get a lot more height on the ball, but still maintain you know, a really low spin rate. So it's not like you're flipping your hands here. He's got the club shaft D lofted. So he's controlling the spin loft of the face. But by doing this, having this very shallow bottom of the swing arc and very little club face rotation, it just becomes a lot easier.

Once you master this movement pattern to have a really consistent ball flight, you're getting a consistent strike because you're not swinging down very steeply. So, you know, most amateurs come down too steep, and then they bought them out a little early or a little bit late. It's very hard to catch the ball cleanly in the center of the face without coming down too steep. We get a little bit of grass in between the face and the ball. Most pros, very, very shallow through the strike. And again, controlling the rotation of that face. We look at it from down the line. You'll see that John, let me bring him back here. So we'll draw a line here roughly in line with his feet. That's about where his feet are aiming, give or take a little bit camera angles can skew all this, of course, but just use that as a basic line.

So you'll see the club is obviously still working on an arc and a push release. And even in the drill I was giving you kind of showing how you're extending the right arm to get the club face, going more toward the target with a square face through the hitting area. You'll see the club is still working around on an arc. It's still working back to the left, but it may feel like for you when you're adding a lot of right arm extension, which John is at in this case already at this point in this swing, lot of right arm extension there. And he feels like he's probably driving the club straight toward the target. It obviously still has to work back less. So that drill I gave you is a, feel, not a real, so long story short. When you're looking at implementing a push release to be able to utilize the right side of the body, right?

You have to drive with that right hip forward first, then the right shoulder. And then you can use that right arm. But before that, the only way you're going to get this club to shallow out and work your hands to work more straight down during the initial shallowing phase is to not be doing much of anything with your right arm. And you still have to have that left arm in control. Otherwise your hands are going immediately this way, they're going straight out toward the ball and that doesn't work. That's going to give you a steep angle of attack. You're going to tend to swing over the top, especially the higher handicaps. And you're going to run into a very difficult time, controlling the club face and path working together. Whereas if you focus first on planning that way in the left side, just like normal and then driving that right hip and then that right shoulder so that the right arm stays back and stays in this flection state so that you can release it very late in the swing.

Then you have a tremendous amount of control over that club face through the hitting area. So that's the primary difference. Again, the left arm shifting to the left side, all of that stuff is pretty much the same. It's just that you're adding more rotation to keep your body rotation in front of your hand. It's kind of the way I think about it. You're trying to keep your right shoulder in front of your hands. Of course it's not, but that's the feeling so that I don't get into the point of flipping it over. When I was switching over, obviously I left side Pooler, releasing the club, passively, letting centrifugal force and trip with a force, release the club for me. If I do that and add right arm, it's a big old flip, you know, I can time it well and still play plus golf plus handicap call.

But that's not something that's ideal. You don't want to be kind of mixing those two things. So when you add right arm, it's not, you're not going to be trying to pull so hard and get the club working left. You'll see in the next couple of players that I show you that with the push release, the club doesn't work left as much. So you'll see the different release patterns as we look at these other players, let's take a look at those. Now. Now let's take a look at a Korean LPG, a player who is definitely not of the size or stature of Jon Rahm. She probably weighs less than Jon Rahm's golf bag. So, but she has a beautiful swing. And you can see so many of the Korean LPGA players coming out with the very similar mechanics who are doing things the same way.

And it is a right side push swing that you are seeing. And let's take a look at how she is employing this push into her swing. So let's take a look first at this three-stage rocket. She does this really, really well and our arms a lot deeper than John's. She doesn't have nearly the upper body arm and shoulder strength of, of John rom or probably most any PGA tour guy. So she's not going to rely on that arm strength as quite as much. So she's going to use more rotation. So you watch a, she starts down watch how aggressive this right hip drive is. And I really want you to burn this into your memory. Cause the next player I'm going to show you is going to do this very different. So a lot of right side rotation, their right hip rotation. Notice the flection in the right knee.

She's driving that right knee forward drive was really driving the right hip forward and her chest is still staying basically open the right shoulder. Hasn't really changed much, but that's about to change, but notice too, how her arms aren't firing back out toward the target. Her left arm is still smashed against her chest. She's trying to leave that until later in the swing, the hips are doing the initial heavy lifting there, the solid rocket boosters of the space shuttle, and then the primary engine, you know, the, the engine of the right shoulder is going to happen and then the right arm. So watch as we get near to impact, she's still turning that right hip driving it forward, but that's going to, to slow down and watch the right shoulder than dive forward. This is critical to avoid releasing the last stage of the rocket, that right arm too soon.

So notice how she's still got a very significant angle in that right arm. That's because that right shoulder has protracted and began to outrun the hands. The right shoulder is trying to move in front. And that allows her to keep that right arm later into the release that right arm flection, which is critical for push release. That's what it is. It's extending, extending that right arm at the tricep quickly through the hitting area. Now you'll see, she doesn't have the strength of John. So she releases a little bit later, but she still has a very aggressive release through that strike with that right arm. And you'll see, the hips are now done. They're just posting up the right shoulder. Can't really move. So it's all just that right arm releasing the club. And she gets into a beautiful follow through. And this is all just these three basic moves, right?

Hip right shoulder, right arm pushing. And you'll see the club doesn't work very aggressively left. In fact, it's working almost out to the right and her hands are actually kind of almost going more. If you drew a line kind of down the target line, a lot of times you'll see golfers whose club works in their hands, worked very hard, left in a push release. You're a lot less likely to see that because the right arm is releasing very late. Now let's take a look at another tour pro who's doing the same movements, been in a slightly different sequence. Okay? So now we've got Brooke Henderson and this brings us back to full circle about the research that I originally started doing about the elevation of the arms and does it matter and how the release and the performance of power and how you're able to use ground force and all of those things.

And what you're going to see in Brooke's case is she's actually going to have very high hands. You'll see the club kind of working pretty severely to the outside. They're going pretty much straight up and her hands are now much higher. And she's got a little bit more of a higher flying right elbow. It's a lot of elevation, right? Her elbow is now basically the center of her chest. Obviously didn't start there. It started down here by her belt buckle. So that's what we would call arm elevation. Now the catch is that she's got to get rid of this arm elevation because you kick off the ball from there at the balls, down on the ground. So what does she do? And this is, what's interesting about her swing. She's going to use a lot of the same, but it's going to be in a slightly different sequence because of the amount of elevation she put in her swing.

It's not that you can't play great golf with a lot of elevation and still be use a right side push release, which she does, but you're going to watch that she's going to have a big, significant left arm loop here. This is left arm driven and body driven. The right arm cannot really create. It can help a little bit. And that's where I, you know, talking about changing the pitch of the shaft a little bit, but this is primarily late lead arm. That's doing this. If the right tricep activated, you would just see this angle completely widened. Cause that's all it can do. If the right tricep starts to fire, her right arm would begin to get much wider, but you can see that. Yeah, that's clearly not what's happened. In fact, her hands have actually taken a pretty complicated route like this. Let's get out of her hands, have basically done this.

They've gone away from the target. And then back down now, as a result of this big shallowing move that she's had to put in because she put in all this extra elevation into her swing, which again is totally fine. You just have to shallow it back out. Watch how much her hands move during this phase of the swing and how little her right hip is moving in comparison to the other golfers that I've shown you. You'll notice that the Korean LPGA gal, she fired her right hip immediately. And she didn't have this big elevation. So she didn't have to go through this big shallowing sequence in order to, to get that left arm down and the keeping the right arm back. So one of the things you'll notice is that as she's doing this as the right hip begins to fire her right shoulder begins to fire a little bit sooner.

Notice this the the wrinkles popping up in her shirt there, but by her right shoulder, this is right shoulder protraction. Just rolling that right shoulder forward, getting ready to drive hard with that right shoulder through the ball. And you'll see that keeps the right arm inflection so that she, as she continues to drive with that right shoulder, she has something left to hit with, which is this angle right here, which again is the prototypical push release position. Her hips are, have still gotten very open at this point, but she was not as aggressive as aggressive with her hips as the Korean LPGA player, she was more aggressive with her right shoulder. Once she got that shallow and moved on. And then as she comes through now, she's got a, you can watch the right arm. It's pretty obvious. There's a lot of right arm extension happening right there.

Look at the angle right before impact. This is milliseconds before impact. You couldn't possibly do anything to change the outcome of your swing at this point. And she's just extending that right arm. So that's what she's been setting up for. And you'll see the rotation in her hips is done. It's just posting up bracing here and right arm extension for the push release. And again, if you watch the club face, look at how quiet the rotation of the faces all the way through the hitting area. Very, very quiet. You see a very shallow angle of attack and a big aggressive right arm release through the hitting area. She did it more right shoulder a little earlier, not as aggressive as right hip, but either way, she got that right shoulder coming forward to keep the right elbow back. If you don't drive that right shoulder forward and a push release, you just have a flip.

And that's what a lot of golfers will do because they start firing the arm too soon. That's the third stage of the rocket she's waiting till the very end. And that's why he, she has this big rerouting move. She knows she doesn't need to do anything with her arms at that point, other than get them shallowed back out. And then the right shoulder rotating driving forward to get that right arm in a position where it can get into push release is the key to moving the club in this way. So right side dominant peeps need right hip right shoulder. And then at the very, very end that right arm release can help push the club through the hitting area and keep the club face very stable so that you can start having complete control over the club face using, helping out more. So with your dominant hand, your right hand, for those of you who, you know, the basic pulling motion and swinging motion is just something that you struggle with this move. Now, while it may look pretty aggressive with this big aggressive push release, if I play it back, you know, relatively fast, it still looks like a normal gospel, even though there's what a lot of people would call a hit in there with that right arm. When you look at this at speed, it looks much like a golf swing. Maybe it doesn't have the beautiful elegance of some other swings that you may have seen on the tour, but the results are the same. You can get there either way.

We're after one thing: Real Results - Real Fast. And that's exactly what our members achieve. And that's why they say the AXIOM is: Mind-blowing. Game changing. Revolutionary.

Check it out ...

Here at RotarySwing, talk is cheap and the proof is always in the pudding. Come see the massive transformations we can achieve together in your swing.

See for yourself ...

From beginner to pro, we have what you need to get you where you want to go.

See how inside ...

RotarySwing was founded out of frustration with the current state of golf instruction. Quinton knew a better way had to exist to learn this game we all love.

Learn more ...