Taking Your Golf Swing Drills to the Course

How to take what you're doing with your golf swing drills in front of the mirror to the golf course.


Hello, everyone. Chuck Quinton here. I want to walk you through something today that's going to be really, really critical and helpful for you learning how to change and conclude your swing, and take something that you've done as a drill inside, in front of a mirror, wherever it may be, and translating that onto the golf course at full speed in a full swing.

                That's one of the most common questions we get all the time is: "I do my drills, I do them perfectly, but when I go out on the course to hit balls, it's not the same. Why is that?" In this video today, I'm going to walk you through exactly why that is and how to make the changes in your swing that are going to take you from the in-front-of-the-mirror pro to being a pro actually hitting a ball.

                I've got a student up here on the left that I just had and I want to walk you through his swing and show you what we did to make these big changes, and help you understand how you may be doing the same mistakes that he was and learn how to flip those around so that you can make those changes happen much, much more quickly in your swing.

                In this example here, this is his swing that he started out with during the lesson, and it's pretty obvious to see that the shaft is extremely steep; it's way off plane at this point. He went and got a lesson, and the instructor told him, you know, "Your shaft is really steep, pretty hard to hit the ball from here. What you need to do is try to get your hands deeper behind you, pull this right elbow deeper behind you."

                Now if you're cringing hearing me say that, that's good. That means you are also learning a lot about the golf swing; you know that that's horrible, horrible advice. Obviously that's just going to over activate the arms even more, which is the problem that we already have. How do we know that?

                Well, I'm going to give you a little secret, and some little cues that I use when I look at my student swings on video to help me quickly diagnosis and analyze what's going on in the swing that's going to help you see the same thing in your own golf swing. When I say that the arms are out overactive, what I'm saying is that the arms are moving more or faster than the body. That's really easy to see with my little trick here.

                I want you to look at the logo on his shirt. We've got a little Jets logo here and as you watch, we can see that Jets logo's moving, right? And the club is moving, and the hands are moving. Now I always like to tell my students that I want them to imagine that their sternum or the logo or on their shirt, it's moving at about the same rate as the hand, the club. In other words, if that golf club's moving, because your logo's turning, or your chest is turning, however you want to phrase it, it's all saying the same thing.

                I want them to imagine that they're moving at a 1:1 ratio, so in other words, if your chest moves an inch, your hands move an inch. Now of course, that's not accurate. It's different from that, but if you imagine that in your head, that the only way my hands are going to move is because my chest is moving them, then we're on the right track.

                But what happens for so many golfers is they start to turn. Now keep an eye on his logo, keep focusing on his left chest. Now what do you notice happening already? You see how the logos look like it's basically frozen on the screen, but the arms and hands have still moved another foot and half, two feet, keep going, keep going; notice his chest is completely frozen now. There's zero rotation happening.

                When the rotation stops, it's about right here, give or take a little bit. From there, how far do you think you're going to hit the ball? Not very far, obviously. Your brain senses that you have no power, no leverage, no loaded up potential energy in your swing, so what do you do? Well, you keep swinging. The club's got to go further back; you know that you need some more power here, and you're not going to get it from a chip shot backswing, right? So your body keeps moving the club in the only way that it can, and that is with your arms, hands, and shoulders.

                As he folds his right arm very early in this swing and starts to load up this right tricep, instead of the big muscles in his body, the right arm is going to get really loaded up here and guess what you're going to fire first coming down? Well, it's not going to be rocket science. Right shoulder, right pec, right tricep; you can actually watch as this trap starts to engage and the right shoulder roll forward as the pec engages.

                This is a purely right-sided dominant movement, this is how you come over the top. He actually does a great job of trying to shallow it out because he has really great lower body movement, but it's all for naught because the arms are completely smashed and buried against his chest, and behind his chest.

                Now the reason this is such a great example is because so many golfers do this exact same thing. They start turning, then they slam on the brakes with their body rotation because they're not prioritizing rotation, and then they keep swinging the club back with their arms; that loads up their arms and their shoulders, and then the only thing they have to fight with coming down to produce any power is this right tricep.

                Now when he came to me, he actually said, "Man, my right elbow's been killing me ever since I took that lesson and started trying to get my arm further back." Well yeah, no kidding, because you're trying to rely on all of your golf power coming from that right tricep. As he begins to fire that right tricep and starts to snap it like he's throwing a ball to try to produce some speed, that elbow's getting a lot of strain on it, and of course, the right side, hopefully you know this one from the other videos, it's that as the right side starts to become more active, it steepens the angle of attack.

                The right side of the body and the downswing can only steepen the golf swing for the most part, especially with the arms. The legs can help shallow it out a little bit, but in general when you think about taking deep divots, it's almost always way too much right arm, right hand.

                So, not only are you hurting your elbow because you're to generate a lot of force from it, but also starting to take a lot deeper divots, you're hitting the ground a lot more often, and this is how people start developing Golfer's Elbow and it's completely changeable as long as you start learning how to swing correctly, the way we advocate.

                Obviously here, deeper divot, short dropped off follow through because there's no swinging motion, it's all a golf hit; it's a right side, right arm hit in this swing, and that's what's causing the shaft to get deep and come down steep. Now, how do we fix this? The secret is quite simple. First of all, look at the position on the right; obviously the same lesson here, a few minutes later. Had him in front of a mirror, his best friend, hopefully he bought one of our little training aid mirrors.

                If you don't have one at your club, because you can stick these in your bag, you can buy them on the store. If not, you've got to have something, to have some sort of visual feedback. Video's awesome, but it's not instant; you've got to video it, then go back and looking at it. Mirror's instant and it never, ever lies to you. What I did was I walk him through the RST five step stuff.

                Now he's watched all these videos, he knows this stuff already, but like so many other golfers out there, watching the videos and putting it into practice the right way takes a little bit more discipline than what some people have put into practice, and that's what I want to show you today. The first thing in the RST five step is what? What's the first video all about?

                Weight shift, right? The first thing we've got to do is shift our weight correctly. Without weight shift working correctly, nothing will sequence in the swing correctly. The first cue that I gave him, I said, "I want you to think about two things. You think about smashing your right ankle into the ground and loading that right glute." Now when you look at this, you can draw a straight line right through the center of his ankle and right through the back of his knee. We know that force is being driven vertically through that ankle, he's being loaded up.

                Notice how you can barely see any of his shoe here, because he's smashed that heel into the ground, compared to over here. Where does this weight look now? Well, right on the ball of his foot of course, right? You can see his whole bottom of his shoe here, and you can see that if I came up and tapped him from behind, he'd fall right over on his face, right, because he's off balance, because he's steepening everything and lifting up the right arm into a position of leverage and not using his legs.

                You can see his right leg is much more straight here; if we a draw line up vertically from the center of his ankle, it's nowhere near the back of his knee, so he's not able to activate that glute properly. This is more calf and quad. Here he looks like he's very obviously sitting back into that glute, which is what we need to do. The golf swing is all about recruiting muscle fiber. We need to generate enough power, enough horsepower to move that golf club at least a hundred miles an hour, and ideally my goal is to get you over 110.

                To do that, we need a certain amount of muscle fiber, at least 32 pounds, to start moving that club fast. You need your chunkiest muscle in your body, which is your glutes, to be activated in the swing to be able to use them for power. When you're out here on your toes, you can't do that. So, number one rule: weight shift first, right glute, right ankle. Right glute, right ankle.

                If you think about those two things, that's what he kept saying to himself in his head. Right glute, right ankle. Then all of a sudden, as he watched himself in the mirror, he began to load up like a tour pro instead of looking like an amateur golfer who's about to fall over. This looks night and day different; much more powerful position.

                Now, the other interesting thing is that this, because it's done first, affects other things down the chain. What does it affect? Rotation. If you don't shift your weight over that right ankle, and you don't get over the right side period, it's almost impossible for most people to have enough flexibility to make a full shoulder turn. Weight shift, there's a reason that I put it first above and all else, because if you want to stop turning only halfway, 30-40 degrees here, and start making a huge shoulder turn like we have here, you've got to get your weight over that right ankle, and you'll simply add 30 degrees of rotation.

                It's very, very important that you get over to that right side to allow you to make a full turn. How do we know he made a full turn without looking at it from face on? Well, it's pretty obvious. We can see his logo facing us no problem, and in fact, he made about a 110 degree rotation.

                Now on the swing on the left where he started, he's making 30 or 40 degrees rotation. He's not even halfway there. How did I get him all the way over here, because before, like most golfers they're thinking, "You know what? I'm in my 60s, mid-60s, I just don't have the flexibility to turn anymore," and he was thinking the same thing. "I'm fit, I'm healthy, but I just can't make a full shoulder turn."

                You're not making a full shoulder turn because you're not turning your shoulder. You're swinging the club. Don't swing the club with your arms and hands; turn your shoulders. If you prioritize turning your body and go through it in the sequence the RST five set walks you through, loading up on the right side first, you can make at any age, this big huge shoulder turn.

                The shoulder turn is partially helping change the swing plane. I didn't discuss swing plane with him at all. Notice that the club is in a completely different position, much closer to being on plane, which it would be once we added the right hand back on there, the left hand's going to tend to over shallow it out a little bit when you're doing these drills, perfectly okay, but compared to this one, we're night and day different. We can actually get the club back down to the ball here.

                What did we do? Weight shift, rotation. Video number two, RST five Step. He's now thinking about, instead of swinging that golf club, he's thinking about turning his rib cage. I told him to turn his chest like he was going to turn and talk to me, once his weight was over that right foot. Now, no problem, no flexibility issues, more than double the shoulder turn he had over here. Huge for power and creating a proper swing plane.

                Now, the next thing we do, what's the next step? RST five step; add the left arm. Clearly we've already gone though that step, fourth step. Add the golf club, clearly we've done that. Now everything's starting to fall into the right place, and we have a completely different look at the top of our swing versus over here.

                As we come down, obviously the next thing we're going to do is shift our weight, watch what happens to that club; instead of coming over the top and getting steeper, look at that. Drops right under the plane, the old proverbial dropping the club down into the slot, right? You've heard that a million times.

                I didn't say anything to him about dropping the club down, period, or trying to put it on plane, or drop it into the slot, or any of that nonsense. You don't manipulate the golf club; you move your body correctly and the club will go where you want. This is further proof of that. Didn't tell him to anything to the club; it's on plane, on plane, on plane, beautiful position, all the way down into impact, and release.

                But now, the bigger question. How do we take these drills done in front of a mirror and translate them into full speed, hitting balls, etc.? I'm going to tell you a quick little story. First of all, how many of you learned how to drive a car of the manual transmission? Most of us have, right? I always talk about this at my clinics. When you learned how to drive a manual transmission, where did you do it? Was it on a busy city street, or the 405 in rush hour traffic in LA?

                No, of course not. That sounds stupid, right? Where did you learn how to do it? Probably in a parking lot somewhere with nobody around, a quiet country road, maybe a field; somewhere where there are as few distractions as humanly possible. Now why is that? Well, pretty obvious, right? You were having a hard time feeling how to slip the clutch just enough, and give it just enough gas to get the car rolling without stalling, or lurching, or any of those things.

                Your brain could only process so much information, right? Now if you went back maybe 20, 30, 40 years later and gotten a manual transmission, it'd be like riding a bicycle for you, right? You've got that motor movement down, that skill set down, because you've done it thousands and thousands of times.

                However, think about the next day when you went out to drive. You spent an hour in the parking lot, you got the basic idea; you can slip the clutch, you can get the car rolling, you haven't stalled it in 15 minutes. You're ready to go, let's go to the Indy 500 tomorrow.

                "That doesn't make any sense either. That sounds really stupid, Chuck. Why are you saying such stupid things?" Because people do the exact same stupid things with their golf swing. They learn something new, having to do it very slowly and very consciously thinking through every step of the swing like he is here; right glute, right ankle, turn my rib cage. That's a lot of mental processing to get all these things right.

                But then people want to do this drill for five minutes, and then go out and play golf, and expect everything to fall into place. Well, that's just as dumb as learning how to drive a manual transmission and then going and racing the Indy 500 tomorrow, because you simply don't have enough repetition for your brain to have mastered this movement pattern. You're not going to be able to do it as you add more distractions; you've got to do it slowly, just like you did when learning how to drive a manual transmission.

                The next day, maybe you went on to a public city street. Slowly but surely, you got more comfortable, more confident, more skilled as you repeated the movement over and over again, and then maybe you went on to a highway somewhere, and then eventually you started going faster and so on and so forth.

                Learning is learning. Any movement pattern, any motor movement, goes through the exact same process. I cover all of this stuff in-depth in my intro videos on how the brain learns new movement patterns. To take what you've learned in front of a mirror, to take it to the golf course, it's a process. It's not a quick fix, a quick tip lesson; it's a process. You're going from learning this one thing and starting to stack more pieces onto it as you go.

                As we've added one piece on here, or added four pieces on, we've got weight shift, we've got rotation, we've got left arm, we've got the golf club; we don't have the golf club flipped right side up yet, we're not ready for that. But eventually, we've got to add that right arm. As we add the right arm, we're going to start adding pace to it and make sure you can do all of these movements together in sequence, and then we'll add a golf ball.

                And we're only going to be hitting little half shots at first, still making sure that his brain can process these distractions, and then we're going to start hitting it further, and then we're going to start going to full speed, and then we're ready to take this out to the golf course. Learning is learning; it doesn't matter who you are, or what it is you're learning. When it comes to motor movements, you must understand the mechanics of learning.

                If you want to stop beating your head against a wall and trying to put all these bandaid fixes and still making the same mistakes over and over again; you want to go from being this guy on the left to this guy on the right, you must work through the process. That's why the RST five step videos are laid out the way that they are: in a sequence.

                Take your time. Take pride in the process, knowing that if you walk through this, you're going to make huge improvements in your swing. I guarantee it, if you go through it the way that it's laid out, you're going to see these huge changes in your swing; going from this to this, this only took 10 minutes.

                Now no, he's not ready to hit full shots with it yet, of course not. Nobody is. These are huge, radical changes, but it's all getting him down the pathway of permanent improvement, and that's what we're looking for. We want to see progress happening from this day forward, every day for the rest of your life, and if you work through things in the sequence and give yourself enough time with the repetitions, you will get there. But don't be that guy going from the parking lot to the Indy 500.

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charles
Chuck. A question. Does adding the core muscles to the downswing allow the club to go faster or does it add more power or torque to the swing? Is that why pros don’t seem to swing at 100%? I can swing my arms as fast as possible but don’t add a lot of distance. Cheers and luv the new private lessons. I have referred a dozen colleagues to your site and they luv it.
July 28, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Charles. Recruiting more muscle fiber definitely adds to more club head speed. Swinging with arms only will limit your potential speed. You need to recruit the core and glutes to hit the ball far! Using torque and short stretch cycle. Exactly why it looks like the pros aren't going at it 100%. They are getting speed through efficiency instead of relying on arms/hands. Thanks for the compliments of our site and referrals. Much appreciated.
July 29, 2019
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sydney
Hi RJ, I've focused on getting the "Vs" in my grip to point toward my right shoulder and right ear. Additionally, addressed the right elbow position so that it point straight out. The bend in my hips, combined with keeping the back straight, is more in line with the instruction.
June 6, 2019
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
It looks a lot better. Good job.
June 6, 2019
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Billy
Well I am back to step one setup.. I was making progress (105 ave to 95) Bam! I now find myself really struggling to break 100. I am back to step 1, setup and see that I did not burn into memory many of the items so flaws continue.. Questions are now different. Like ball position, is it based upon ones ear position before or after axis tilt? Never entered my mind until I started over. Any suggestions appreciated, as I now see that I attempted to go the Indy 500 route before I left the country road. P.S. a point of compounding the issue is the fact that I am left handed and my short game sucks. First things first - full swing!
April 27, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Billy. Typically, you shouldn't be adding so much tilt that the ball position is affected that much. I usually have students set the ball and then add the slight tilt. Take a look at Common Setup Faults and Fixes for further help and to make sure it isn't over cooked. Parking lot to the Indy 500 is a big no no!
April 27, 2019
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Richard
So do you recommend not playing golf with your imperfect swing while you're going through the course? Rich
February 24, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Richard. Ideally, during the rebuild golf would be held to a minimum to focus on building the new movement pattern.
February 24, 2019
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James
Thank you! You are so consistent and those of us who tend to be Thye A or Stuborn need that pounded in to us.! Since our original lesson in Orlando which made us both somewhat frustrated, I have taken the baby steps you continue to preach and I cannot thank you enough for the fun I am having with my swing. I hope to have the opportunity to meet up again sometime as I know we would both be much happier with the results!! Jim Yonkers
February 24, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jim. Awesome post and thanks for compliments. We are all a little stubborn when changing the swing.
February 24, 2019
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charles
What does Chuck use for taking the videos? What app does he use for the side-by-side playback and analysis?
February 24, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Charles. Chuck is using V1 up above. V1 and Hudl Technique for Golf are the most popular ones players use on the site.
February 24, 2019
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Mark
Just watched your video and makes me wonder how can we integrate this learning if we are actually playing golf once a week. Are you saying it is better to not play until this new swing is learned?
January 25, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Mark. It is better to delete playing during the initial phases of rebuilding the swing. If you do play though take a bunch of cheap balls and focus on getting the correct move down and not the score.
January 26, 2019
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Kevin
I just signed up for Rotary Swing last week and have been through most of the intro videos and have begun doing setup drills. I played today and had 92, it was comical. I'm an 8 and had so many setup thoughts I was terrible, but expected struggles and I'm excited to continue training with very little golf in next couple months, short term pain for long term gains.
February 4, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Kevin. Thinking and playing golf is definitely not easy. It takes time to get the new movement patterns in place. Minimize golf in the initial and focus on the change. Good things ahead!
February 5, 2019
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Billy
As I progress with the nine to three drill with irons, I tried using a three wood/driver. Using a less than 50 percent swing for the most part they go down the line. An attempt to swing closer to 70-100 percent, I start getting a low fade/slice. I am left handed so this means to the left of the intended line. Watching the anti hook video using a driver I experimented with ball position and slight stance adjustment. A start to bandade, so I do not want to go there. Ideas will be appreciated.
January 18, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Billy. 9 to 3 at higher speeds with woods can be challenging. I don't think your issue is too much a function of improper technique. But, time to swing the longer club at a faster pace.
January 18, 2019
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Erik
Going into winter, I am faced with a dilemma. I currently have a Players Club 'gym-like' membership at my local AGC course. Getting started with the videos, I am finding that it's better to do this in my backyard, and hit into a net if I am at that point. My concern is that if I cancel the Players Club they will jack up the fees next spring. But am I doing myself a disservice by going to the range at least once a week to justify the cost of the membership?
October 25, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Erik. Ideally, during the beginning phases of the rebuild you wouldn't want to be a range rat. However, going once a week may help you push yourself further. Use it as a practice tool to gauge where you are at in the swing progress. It will bring out the flaws you need to put more concentration on fixing. Just keep hyper focus the goal is achieving a better move, and not what the ball is doing.
October 25, 2018
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stephen
These 3 videos in sequence in the university progressive,stacking and take it to the course got through to me how to use your tools and teaching. It just looked pot pourri up to now. Thanks.
April 7, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Stephen. Thanks for the post and happy you found some useful tips.
April 7, 2018
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stephen
I get "stuck" on the right side in the downswing especially on the course when stiffening the legs is subconscious because of all the information being processed by the brain. I can consciously avoid this result and the related swing faults when practicing the weight shift and downswing drills in front of a mirror or practice net. It comes back on the course. How do I cure this problem? What videos should one focus on? I am told tiger has had this problem.
March 21, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Stephen. I would focus on the RST Tempo Drill and Weight Shift Sweep Drills. Because you may modify those and actually hit some shots on the course to give you the proper feeling. Also, set smaller goals. If you are struggling with weight shift. Focus on getting the weight shifted regardless of the other positions in the swing.
March 21, 2018
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stephen
That response sounds like goog advice. Let me try those drills and approach.
March 22, 2018
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Dennis
What are some of the other drills or lessons that Chuck uses video and lines to help illustrate how we should be positioned at key points of the swing?
February 14, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dennis. There aren't a lot of videos like the one above. My suggestion would be taking a look at the tour pro videos. Practically every video shows lines and diagrams of proper positions.
February 15, 2018
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Dennis
As an alternative... how about good back and side views of Chuck being setup with a a club to use for a visual check.
February 15, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dennis. Take a look at Dustin Johnson - Setup for Consistency and feel free to use the Self Analysis tool to compare your setup to his.
February 15, 2018
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graham
I have learned a lot since studying and practicing RST drills. I have put in 100s if not 1000s of reps on the various RST programs [eg 6 weeks to a perfect impact, or the latest sessions om takeaway, right shoulder behind head, etc]. and I have fabulous results on the practice range hour after hour ,day after day. But then I go to the course and play an entire round without making even one or two good swings. No one has ever been able to give me a way to take my improved swing to the course. I suspect it has to do with muscle tension or golf course anxiety. but when I play I no longer turn properly, I seem to have no tempo or transition, etc. The more I train and practice, the better my swing and shots get on the driving range and the worse my game gets on the course. Any suggestions or ideas would be appreciated.
October 13, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Graham. My question would be do you know exactly how much the swing changes from the range to the golf course? Example: One of my unlimited students was struggling with the exact same thing. He filmed his practice session and some on course swings. We compared both versions and noticed that the practice wasn't that much different than the course, but the course was more exaggerated in the wrong direction. Once we knew the tendency when going to the course. We hit home really hard the major flaws one by one and with the sole goal of getting the move down versus result. I didn't care if he hit three OB as long as he started down on plane properly and stopped holding the face at impact. Once, he was able to start getting the move more consistent on the course. He started playing much better with a proper move ingrained.
October 13, 2017
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graham
I have learned a lot since studying and practicing RST drills. I have put in 100s if not 100s of reps
October 13, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Graham. I replied above.
October 13, 2017
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Michael
Would you recommend not playing while learning RST?
September 18, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Michael. Ideal scenario would be shelving the golf rounds while rebuilding.
September 21, 2017
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Michael
That would be the hardest part
September 21, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
True. However, short term pain for long term gain.
September 21, 2017
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Bill
Please help; I can make a correct turn back and thru when I take a practice swing with good arm, body, and posture positions. But, when the ball is in front of me I get ‘jerky’ at the top of the back-swing, hesitating or stopping and often not finishing a complete back-swing. What swing thoughts or drills are required to overcome this problem?
September 16, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Bill. Have you tried practicing at different rates? I would work on 20% and 30% swings. Figure out a pace that you can make your practice swing with a ball in front. Even if its only a 50 yard shot with a 7 iron. Slowly from there start to ingrain the correct move and don't increase the pace gradually until you can repeat the motion.
September 16, 2017
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Bill
Do you mean that be a 20% - 30% swing speed taking a full turn back and thru OR just take the club back 20% - 30% then make a full speed downswing?
September 16, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Bill. Full Swing. Slower paced.
September 17, 2017
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Bill
OK; great suggestion. I've been working on what you said on the range; very slow swings to in-grain the proper movements & muscle memory. On the course I've noticed better swings but much shorter shots. How do I ramp it up without getting the yips? (which seems to happen when I try to ramp it up)
December 6, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Bill. It is a gradual curve. Think about the analogy Chuck uses with a car. You learn in an empty parking lot, small neighborhood, city and then Indy 500. Sadly, you might not be ready for the Indy 500 yet. But, it will get there with more and more proper reps.
December 6, 2017
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Cal
Where's the putting tips
August 8, 2017
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
We have a section of videos on putting that should help you. If you need some sort of additional help that the videos do not pass along, let us know and we will gladly assist you.
August 9, 2017
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Steve
Great vid. When I fully rotate the rest of the swing seems easy, almost automatic. Feel balanced and in a more powerful position at the top. Just let drop let the club drop (a key for me) and release. It feels like a much slower swing but the ball easily goes farther. Go figure. If my golf IQ wasn't 12, I would remember to do this every time. Working on it. Like your swing memory tips!
August 8, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Steve. Thanks for the compliments on the video. No worries. We all start with a 12 in golf IQ.
August 8, 2017
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Arthur
Hi Chuck, I like the analogy of learn driving a manual car, is there tip for teach kids the concept of muscle/motor memory? Thanks,
August 1, 2017
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hi Arthur, kids are like sponges and will pick up on movement patterns very quickly, if they are doing them correctly and they do not already have pre-existing movement patterns that you are trying to overwrite.
August 1, 2017
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Arthur
bingo, thanks.
August 1, 2017
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Dexter
You still want to go golfing during this learning time. So you don't want to take your bad habits to the golf course. Shouldn't you try to use what you have learned?
July 30, 2017
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Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
Yes, you always want to try and continue to work on the new movement patterns, however, if you're in a tournament or something similar, you need to just play with what you've got.
July 31, 2017
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Dexter
OK. Thanks Chuck
July 31, 2017
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Steve
Great video-Right on 'my' money.I'm suffering big time from being too steep. I'm 66 years old and have been playing for 53 years--I'm having lessons from a fantastic 'Tour Coach' -this video is EXACTLY what I need to cement in my swing! I hope to hang on to single figure HCP & enjoy golf for many years to come! Must get a logo on my shirt! THANKS Chuck! Steve UK
July 30, 2017
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Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
You're welcome Steve!
July 31, 2017
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David
Hi, are you suggesting that golfers who are going through the process of developing a swing and doing the repetitions shouldn't go out and play a game of golf until they have finished the process? If not, what do you suggest they think about when they do? How should they approach a golf game on the course while they are still undergoing the learning process? David
July 29, 2017
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stephen
My golf coach always said practice thoughts should remain on the practice range and that one should only think about turning all the way through to a perfect finish position on the golf course. He was briefly on tour, went to Q school and has played with former tour players in tournaments. He told me that he always asks the tour pros what they think for swing thoughts on the course. Most say turn all the way through to a perfect finish position. Yes your old habits will come out on the course. I am frustrated to with the transition swing blues but that is the price of improvement I am told. Would like to see what these guys say on this site.
July 30, 2017
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Will
I agree with Duncan's comments below. I signed up for RST knowing my swing needed work, with the goal to be able to PLAY golf [better]. I understand it's a learning process - but let's be real, during that process who's not going to play golf??? Extremely frustrated at this point! Made some big changes, but having NO FUN with golf - what a shame! Can you please offer some advice for those of us who are in transition from old swing habits to new ones; i.e. how to go from the parking lot to at least to the neighborhood streets... I'll worry about racing later Thank you!
July 29, 2017
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hi Will, We totally understand that most people aren't going to stop playing when trying to make changes. Take a look at my responses below and see if that offers any insight to help you with the process. Also, PLEASE, take advantage of the swing reviews as part of your membership, if you aren't already doing so, and let us instructors help you in the areas that you need to focus on while being on the course. We love to help like that.
July 29, 2017
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Frank
I've struggled with that too. When it sunk in that changes take time and lots of reps, I decided that on the course I'd forget RST and just swing away. On the course you may make 40-50 full swings anyway, and during the week at home, I'm doing hundreds of the RST swings. Eventually RST starts taking over your swing. All of a sudden, you realize it's been ingrained. The best time for massive change is the winter. Summer is the time for having fun on the course. Keep working on RST, knowing it takes time.
July 29, 2017
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Hank
So here is the question. When you go to the golf course to play and try to implement the new swing pattern for a particular drill like weight shift with rotation and I find myself in between the new and the old swing and my golf game is going to hell. Do I keep trying to implement understanding that the golf may be just plain ugly for a while. I would think that if I just allow myself into the same old bad habits, it will only make my learning curve that much longer.
July 29, 2017
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hi Hank, Unfortunately, the person you bring to the dance is the one you are stuck with. You cannot change a movement pattern on the fly, no matter what any instructor tries to tell you. You have to fix things incrementally. When on the course, it is best to stick to full commitment of the new movement pattern you are trying to fix, regardless of the results. I know it's hard to do this because your old movements may not be jiving well with the new movements. However, if you look at the golf swing from a big picture perspective, and understand that you have to fix certain things first, before you can get to where you want to go, then the process becomes a lot more easy on you. Playing can slow the learning process down BUT we don't ever want to keep you from playing. I would always suggest that you allow us instructors to help you with a plan to take to the course while in the midst of swing change. Hope that helps.
July 29, 2017
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Duncan
Ok I get all that but does this mean: "take a 1 month/3 month/6 month break from playing golf on the golf course with your buddies until you have worked through this "process" thoroughly"? I can do that but the down-side is that I won't be getting much value from my golf club membership for this period - and I know that I simply revert to old habits when on the course at full speed so there doesn't appear to be a productive compromise solution?
July 29, 2017
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Duncan, You can still work on swing change while playing or hitting balls. However, it will slow the process down. It's always best to work on one thing at a time, take full commitment to the movement and understand that you are in the midst of change. As an instructor, it's hard to tell students not to play or practice during swing change and I know how frustrating it can be as a student to put so much work in and not see immediate results. On the flip side, if you really want to improve your game, then you have to take the time to work through changes and allow us to help you along the way through the swing review process. Here's an example: I have been working with a RST student for several years now on fixing his across the line position at the top of his backswing. He is very well established player and he knew that fixing the position at the top of his swing could disrupt his ball striking a bit. He stuck to the plan we put in place and endured some of the struggles and now we are working at taking this new position at the top of his swing and making him more powerful and more consistent in the hitting area. If you have a goal for you game and a plan that we will work our butts off to make sure you have in place, we can help you get to where you want to go. A lot of times, you wont even have to go through a struggle period when making changes, you just need to be willing to allow us to help you along the way. Rest assure, Chuck, Craig, Aaron, myself etc, will always do what we can to give you a clear plan to take to the course. Hope that helps and if you need anything at all, I will gladly assist you.
July 29, 2017
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colin
Great explanation Chris , this really helped in explaining some of the struggles we have to endure , it sure is frustrating because we all want to be better at this game and in todays world we want it now. There is no quick fix in golf as i've come to realise over the years , but just over these last few months since dedicating my time to improvement i can see lasting results. Keep up the great work and producing great videos like these
July 30, 2017
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Chris
This video explains why it takes many many reps to make a swing change. It's about how the brain processes. Cut and paste this address: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MFzDaBzBlL0
July 29, 2017
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Absolutely fantastic video and one we would suggest that all students of the game watch!!!
July 29, 2017
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Dave
Hi Chris. Another point worth making is that key to success in sport in particular is how to overcome difficulties and setbacks. Without exception the best sportsmen and women are the ones who have worked on changes or improvements and failed but then picked themselves up and carried on until they overcome the challenge. They then move onto the next incremental improvement and go through the same hard work and initial dissapointment and until they succeed. Treat every moment of failure when changing as a temporary and never consider others have god given talent that is unnattainable to most people. Science is starting to show that pretty much anyone with sufficient t purposeful practice can learn complex movement patterns to a very high standard if they are prepared to take the time and follow a structured approach. The body is not innately gifted with something like the golf swing- it's a motor skill that the brain controls and by definition everyone can do it. In my opinion it's the single most important thing to remember.
August 18, 2017
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Robert
Well spoken Dave. Even the great Ben Hogan said "...All golf swings are constructed" and, even in his case, built on mountains of failure.
January 26, 2018

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