How to Cure the Shanks in 3 Steps

The golf shank is the ugliest, nastiest, rottenest, and most frightening shot in golf. If the shanks hijacked your swing or they happen to sneak up on you, I have some good news for you… In this video, I’ll show you a 3-step process that identifies what kind of shanker you are and the corresponding drill you need to end the shanks once and for all. Check out this video now to cure the shanks and start enjoying golf again!

  • Evaluate what sort of shank you are experiencing
  • Fine tune your release
  • Correct your path and body movements
  • Shanks are gone forever

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TOM
Finish comment: in using the correct release of the club. Do you fine that would be the case? Tom
June 4, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Tom. More than likely you didn't fight the free rotation of the face because the body wasn't rushing to impede it's movement.
June 4, 2020
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TOM
Thanks Craig for the quick reply. It appears to me that with feet set up to correct the sh__k , it helped me in using
June 4, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Tom. I answered above. No worries on quick reply.
June 4, 2020
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TOM
Craig: I tried the drill of keeping right foot back from the left and no shanks. Hit the distance I normally would from the usual set up. Would this be usable during a golf round? I’m thinking about trying it tomorrow. Any danger to doing this during a round? Thanks, Tom
June 4, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Tom. I have done that with my driver during competition to quit over active hips.
June 4, 2020
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Matt
Does any of this apply to shanking chip shots and short pitches? They’ve Plagued me for almost two years.
May 3, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Matt. Absolutely can contribute. But, more than likely over use of trail hand and driving towards the ball.
May 3, 2020
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Mickey
Has anyone else experienced persistent shanks after trying to incorporate RST? I've been diligent with working on the recommended drills in front of a mirror at home for over a month. I haven't played in that time period as I'm also recovering from elbow surgery. Saturday was the first time I'd played a full 18 holes and it was the most miserable day of golf since I started playing 25 years ago!!!! I've always been between scratch and a 4 handicap and Saturday I looked like someone that has never played. I think I shanked half of my iron shots. Makes me want to throw the clubs away.
September 17, 2019
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Mikko-Pekka
Hello Mickey. Been there done that. Sometimes when going trough a swing rebuild you can get caught between old and new movement patterns and that can cause those shanks. Have you send your swing for review? And drills you have been working on? That way an istructor can pinpoint what maybe causing your shanks.
September 17, 2019
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sjahari
same thing happening to me. shanks and topping the ball and everything else after a month of doing the drills. At the same time, in between that are nice long and straight shots like I have never had before. I am hoping that the balance will shift to the latter.
September 17, 2019
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Colin
This is relation to my previous comment where Chuck made a throwaway comment that most people have clubs that are too long. Could somebody expand on that?
May 31, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Colin. Clubs that are too long will affect posture and force a player to make compensations at impact to get out of the clubs way. Typically, you will stand too tall and start prematurely coming out of the shot too early. Which can lead to trail hip push which is one of the causes of the shank.
May 31, 2019
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Colin
I'm virtually shanking every ting! Until I fix the issue, I can't play. I've tried to cure it but nothing I do seems to work. I'm 99% sure that I'm coming from the inside but before this started I was suffering from a poor release and steering. I think try poor release (although I know what I should do) is the crux of the issue. In trying to fix both problems, I picked up an old 3 iron from my set which I no longer use. It has the original grip - the clubs I use have had larger grips fitted. When I swung the club with the standard grip I felt that it was easier to let the club go. It occurred to me that maybe the larger grips I use could be causing my poor release and shanking. Do you think this could possibly be causing my issue or am I clutching at straws?
May 31, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Colin. Without seeing your swing it would be tough to diagnose. However, too large a grip will start to inhibit wrist set and release. It may be easier for you with the smaller grip to allow the club to rotate properly. If you think excessive inside is causing the shank. Take a look at Trace the Plane Line Drill.
May 31, 2019
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marshall
Suffered from the shanks on and off for over a year. Your right knee drill seems to have solved the problem. No one else noticed it or said anything. Thanks for your insight into the swing and your ability to communicate it.
February 13, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Marshall. Great. Happy to hear the good news and appreciate the compliments.
February 13, 2018
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Konstantin
Hi! I don’t shank the ball with full swing however i do when chipping. Are the causes the same?
November 12, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Konstantin. Yes, you will typically see the same causes. Most of the time the chipping shank is caused by excessive body movement driving towards the ball, or overly using trail hand push.
November 13, 2017
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Benjamin
Looking at the video of the inside shank that you used, how much of that shank is caused by taking the club too far back to the inside on the take away?
August 16, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Benjamin. Rolling the club to the inside is definitely a culprit that may cause a shank. In fact, I just cured someone on the Swing Review System that it was the main cause "rolling the hands off the ball." Use the Bucket Drill and 4 Square Drill to get the club back in front. Made a world of difference for the student.
August 16, 2017
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Benjamin
Chuck in the related article talks about driving hard with the right shoulder from the top of the backswing. Even if it shortens the distance to the ball won't you spin your shoulders open to fast and cut across the ball or delay a proper release?
August 5, 2017
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
HI Benjamin, You do NOT want to spin your shoulders through the hitting area as it will definitely delay the release. You want your legs to pull your shoulders down into the hitting area so you can post up properly and release the club.
August 6, 2017
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James
Have you seen shanks come from a late release meaning the release doesn't start at the start of the trailing thigh but instead at the inner thigh?
June 9, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. If you late release and are holding onto excessive lag by that point you can. Work on delivering it more effectively. Perfecting Your Golf Impact 1 of 4 in the Bonus Series.
June 9, 2017
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Michael
Hi, I was recommended this drill after a swing review. I've been working on it but I find that at faster speeds, when my obliques pull my lead hip, my right (trail) knee tends to want to kick out towards the ball. I do not feel like its coming from any right side push (I'm focusing hard on keeping right side passive), but more like a "equal and opposite" reaction to the pulling of my lead hip away from the ball. Any suggestions?
March 12, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Michael. Take a look at the Preventing Hip Pain Video. I think you need a good feeling of allowing the trail leg to be pulled through and up. You can push from the trail leg, or you can restrict it too much.
March 14, 2016
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Lisa
If take a look at top view. How far back does my left arm goes - does it pass my shoulder line 30 degree ?(as an example). Could you give me name of the video title "practice with the impact bag". Thanks.
September 10, 2015
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Awesome -- We would have to see your swing in order to best determine where your focus should be. Impact bags are great for helping you understand where all the parts of you body are at impact. The big payoff. Check out the release videos to help you with this.
September 11, 2015
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Lisa
when both feet stand even, what is the check point for bringing club to the top (how far back does my left arm goes - for a right hand player). Thank you.
September 9, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Awesome. When you are working on left arm only and trying to perfect the swing into the impact bag. You only need to raise it little higher than belt buckle height.
September 10, 2015
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Ernie
Craig, I'm fairly new to RST. I love the instruction and have been working hard through the program. I played for almost ten years prior to RST with little instruction and never once shanked a shot. Unfortunately, as I begin to build a swing based on RST fundamentals, I have developed a persistent shank that has derailed my progress. I've watched the shank video a few times and am performing the drills but I still cannot shake it. Realizing that there are different swing flaws that cause a shank, my next step is to submit a video for review. But before I do that I'd like to ask a question. I reviewed Chuck's 7-iron down the line video and noticed that his hand position is closer to the ball at impact than it is at setup. The feeling I have, for my particular shank, is that my hands are also closer to the ball at impact. I have been assuming that that is what's causing me to contact the ball with the hosel instead of the club face. And that the closer hand position is the result of a slight right side dominant over-the-top motion. However, when I look at Chuck's shaft angle at impact, I noticed that the shaft angle is more upright or steeper than it is at address. Logically, in Chuck's swing, it seems that the steeper shaft angle at impact is offsetting the closer hand position, enabling pure contact with the ball. Before I proceed with my swing review, can you help me better understand the physics and fundamentals involved with hand position and shaft angle at setup versus impact. I think that understanding this dynamic would be a key component to helping me overcome the problem. Thank you. Your assistance is greatly appreciated. Please reference any related videos in your response.
May 10, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ernie. No problem. The issue you are trying to understand is shaft droop. Take a look at Proper Golf Swing Plane in the Introduction Advanced Section. Probably will be easier to understand than a lot of my typing .
May 11, 2015
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Steven
Hi Craig. I'm shanking all the time. I've got to the point where I cannot play. I have had a long lay off due to a broken right knee, before this I was playing off 11 handicap. I have been trying for 8 months, lots of lessons many hours of practice, all to no avail. I've got where I'm frightened to hit the ball. All my shots come off the heel, even with the woods and driver. My swing is now a mess due to compensations I think. Please HELP!
May 9, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Steven. Without seeing your swing it would be tough to determine the culprit. Have you uploaded your swing to the online review forum? I would be happy to take a look. Or, can you elaborate a little more on the faults in the swing. Too inside, over the top. etc....
May 9, 2015
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Steven
Sorry Craig. My divots usually point left not right as I miss informed you in my last reply
May 9, 2015
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Steven
Hi Chris, often my divots go right, and when I do hit a reasonable ball I tend to miss left, so that points to over the top! I have been working on belt buckle, over the top, 5 mins to perfect release, takeaway and of course the shank video. I feel my club face is open, but I'm told it's not. I'm not making any progress because I can't get rid of this fault. I practice a lot without a ball, swing feels good! As soon as I introduce the ball, CARNAGE!!
May 9, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Steven. Have you Tried the Over the Top Stick Drill in the Downswing Advanced Section? Also, you need to have more retention of angle and awareness for impact. Try some of the Drill from the Taking a Divot Video Downswing Advanced Section.
May 10, 2015
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Donald G
Which video is the '5 minutes to the perfect release' video?
January 2, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Donald. The 5 Minutes to the Perfect Release is in the Full Swing Program Downswing Section.
January 3, 2015
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Peter
Hoping this gets to Craig Morrow Hey Craig, I see you are answering questions on this video, you have reviewed my swing for the last 2 months and I have made so much progress. My iron shots are so much crisper and my driver is going allot father. I have not play in 4 weeks because of the weather. I hit almost 100 balls a day in my garage with the plan you have laid out to me. I have never had the shanks and now all of a sudden they will crop up. I do not understand why, I have watched this video allot and still can not figure out how they come. would sending a video to get analyzed help. I will hit 15 solid and crisp 6 irons and then they will show up and the only way I can get rid of them is slowing everything down. please help. and again thanks so much for the help so far. this web site has been the best golf investment ( Money vs. Results ) I have ever maid in 10 years.
December 1, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Peter. Truly appreciate the kind words and compliments of the site. We are here are pleased to see that you have made progress and feel its a worth while investment! Nevertheless, we don't want you struggling with this issue. A video analysis would help. Even if you submitted a shot that wasn't the "S," I will more than likely be able to figure out where the culprit is coming from. Slowing everything down is always a good fix for the majority of swing problems. But, something might be off a little bit. Let me take a look, so we can rid you of this evil curse.
December 3, 2014
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James
For about a month now I have been attacked by the Shank virus. It creeps up when you least expect it and it seem it from about 100 yds in! But not exclusively. I have watched the cure the shanks video repeatedly and performed both drills and they work for a while then there they are again! I have to say that for some time now even when I strike any club solidly I seem to impact nearer to the hosel. I have tried moving a little further from the ball and as everything works for a while then back to hosel rockets. I have the length and the rest of the game to be very close to a scratch player but can't get over this barrier of Shanksville, Indiana. I know it's hard to give a fix without seeing my swing, but I must have a fundamental problem somewhere.
August 21, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello JIm. If everything is correct from the Shank Video, there must be something your not seeing. Please feel free to upload a video for review. We would be happy to help you with your situation.
August 21, 2014
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will
I had these this problem show up at our member guest completely out of no where. I have been playing great this year. So much so that I haven't visited the site or submitted any videos. I have a qualifier this week, and this has now crept into my mind. I'm one of those instant amnesia kind of golfers, but this has really effected me mentally. I did not really want to come on here and watch anything before my qualifier, but I needed to see where I was when this shot was occurring. I plan to run through a good day of drilling. This problem is demoralizing.
June 23, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Will, we have all been there. No worries. This is a judgement free zone. I have experienced the problem in my amateur and professional career at certain times. This video should help cure the ailment. Now, this isn't RST. Nevertheless, in my playing career a sports psychologist told me to setup up with the ball inline with the toe and try to hit the exact same spot at impact if I got nervous on the course or it crept up. Typically, you end up hitting the sweet spot instead. However, if you hit the toe. It is a way better miss than the shaft. Good Luck!
June 23, 2014
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Eugene
Hello. I rarely shank full shots, but sometimes scare people on the range with short pitches. Is the cause the same and will these drills help with short pitch shot shanks? Thank you.
May 25, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Eugene, these drills can will certainly work with short shots. learning the release stuff will help you immensely before the path drills.
May 27, 2014
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Geoff
Hi. This is a general question rather than one related to the video (let me know if there's a place for general questions). I'm not clear on whether an iron on a shortish par 3 is best played off the turf or off a tee. Most discussion threads on other sites seem to favour off a tee. Some also say that the idea of there being a benefit in squeezing the ball between club face and turf is a myth. What does RST say on this? Many thanks. Geoff.
May 25, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Geoff, we say that you get 18 perfect lies a round and you should always tee the golf ball up even on short par 3's. You will want the ball teed very low when you are hitting an iron but take advantage of the fact that you get 18 perfect lies during the round.
May 27, 2014
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William
So sometimes I get El Hosel - out of nowhere right in the middle of a round. What is the best way to manage the round when that happens (short of walking off the course to the clubhouse bar). Some swing thought, pre-shot or prayer would be nice.
May 22, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Yeah that can be a tough thing to overcome mentally. The key on the course is to make sure that you are controlling the face with the lead arm into the hitting area. Keep the lead arm relaxed so that it can release and square up properly. When you walk into your shot, if any sort of negative thought pops into the head then you need to back out of the shot and reset. When you start to fight with your swing in the middle of the round, you are building more and more tension in the hands and the arms and things will just progressively get worse. Stay relaxed and stay positive.
May 23, 2014
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Luc
great video! that alignment stick drill to monitor my right knee is such a great drill for me as i have been struggling with this (open shoulders) and knowing i was doing but having a hard time to square my shoulder ... i got more reps to do but really good .. question for you - when you shift to the left, is there a specific swing thought or trigger to help you do this in your full swing? i know it's different for everyone, but curious is this pulling to the left action coming more from the hips or left inside leg? or both? just looking for more isolation on what muscles to use without over complicating it. Thank you.
May 22, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Thanks and glad you enjoyed it. When sitting into the left side, it is best to feel some slight external rotation of the lead hip/leg. That pulls the hips to the lead side and passively unwinds them a bit. Once you are into the left side fully, pull with the left obliques to pull the left hip away from the target. The more lead side you think the better, as the trail side will react and not be so prone to push. Good luck
May 23, 2014

Today we're going to we're going to get rid of that embarrassing problem once and for all, the shank. I'm going to walk you guys through a three step process on how you're going to get rid of the shanks once and for all and never deal with it again, never embarrass yourself, never embarrass your friends and certainly never put yourself in danger. Let's go ahead and get started.

                Fore.

                All right. So if you've ever been plagued with the virus of the shanks, I'm going to go ahead and walk you through the first step of correcting it and that's being able to understand what kind of shank you have. Okay. And I've drawn three very critical lines on here for us and I'm going to go through what these lines mean. The first one being on the left hand side of the screen here, this one going up from the hosel through the elbow is going to be a plane line here, it's going to be an elbow plane. The second line here is going to be called the knee line and the third line is going to be called the tush line.

                Okay. So I'm sure you've probably heard of the tush line and you've heard of the elbow plane line, but the knee line is going to be different here. All right. So I've drawn both those lines on here for Chuck and our student that has a little problem with the shanks at this point that we're working on. And I'm going to go ahead and work through into a position here where we're going to be able to identify what kind of shank you have. All right. So let me back Chuck up just a little bit.

                So we're virtually in the same spot here as far as positions are concerned. You're going to notice a couple of things here. First thing I want you to notice is is how low the club head is in relation to this plane line, where Chuck's club head is actually tracing perfectly down this plane line. Okay. And this is a common thing, this is, this is a shank from the inside. This is a very common area for people that are known as hip spinners, people that like to spin the body wide open and that makes the club come into the plane line shallow.

                And now what's happened as well, the most important part is that this right knee has broken through this line which has caused his body to get closer to the golf ball, the right side of his body is going to be closer which means the hosel of the golf club is now working into that area where we can strike the golf ball. Also take note that his tush has come off this line which is another indicator that he's moved closer to the shot and thus leading the hosel in.

                So you can see over here the difference is that Chuck has got his tush still up against this line and his right knee has not broken through at all. And if I were to go through another frame or two here past impact, you can see that his right knee is well in front of this right knee line. You can see how Chuck's knee has still stayed past, where it stayed behind it and his tush is still up on the line, where his tush has come way off of it. And this is going to be a shank all day.

                So this is a shank from the inside. Now if you notice from the position, this position, that your club is on top of this line then you're going to be an over the top shanker. And that's why I want you guys to understand there's two separate drills that I want you to understand that you can work on to correct these, but you have to understand what kind of shanker you are at that point.

                So admitting that we have a problem is the first, first thing. Step number one to the correction process is to evaluate it. And then let's go ahead and head out to the range and get started by giving you some drills. All right. So hang tight, we're going to head out to the range. I'm going to show you a couple of really important drills that are going to help you get over this once and for all. You can put those hard hats away and get out there and enjoy the game.

                Okay. So now that we've looked at the first step on how to identify your particular style of shank, whether it be over the top or inside the line, I'm going to go ahead and give you step number two which is going to pertain to both golfers.

                And I think this is one of the most critical steps and it's one of the most important videos on the site, and you're going to hear me say that a lot, that five minutes to a perfect release in the downswing section is going to teach you how to release the golf club properly because both shanks, whether it be from over the top or whether it be from the inside, is going to have a hung onto release.

                So you're going to have the hosel of the golf club leading into the golf ball. So you really want to go ahead and fine tune your release. That's going to be step number two. I want you to spend as much time as possible working on that. And make sure you get yourself an impact bag and when you're working on left hand only and hitting that bag you want to make sure that your left wrist is good and flat, the club face is good and square and you have a limited amount of tension within the forearm and the wrist. Okay. You're going to be having a golf club in your left hand quite a bit throughout this correction process. But that's step number two. I want you to really pay close attention to five minutes to a perfect release.

                Let's move on to step number three and get these things handled once and for all so we don't have to be an embarrassment on the golf course any longer.

                Okay. Here we are at step three, the correction process of getting rid of those shanks once and for all. We're almost gradated, we're almost putting those things to bed and never seeing them again.

                Now let's go ahead and get you guys a couple of good solid drills that are going to help you, give you some time to correct those paths that we talked about in that step one. But make sure that you understand that there's a lot of information in five minutes to a perfect release that needs to be held onto as we're starting to fix these other problems. Okay. So five minutes to a perfect release better be nailed down before we start working on these drills.

                One of the things that is very common, aside from the release, is that the shoulders like to spin open into impact and they can cause a lot of the shanking problems as well. So both styles of shank, over the top and inside the line, make sure that your shoulders are nice and square at impact.

                Now I'm going to go ahead and give you guys a drill for those inside the line shankers. And I've gone ahead and set myself up here an alignment stick, I'm going to have my toes right up on it and I've got myself an impact bag. All right. So I'm going to go ahead and work this drill a bunch. I'm going to load up to the top, I'm going to shift left and then I'm going to hit the bag. And I'm going to try to keep my knee from not moving in front of this line, as we talked about in step one. If you see that your knee is covering this line on the ground, then chances are you've spun yourself open and you've got that heel leading into the golf club again. So now if you think about it this way, you're moving closer to the golf ball, the heel of the golf club is going to lead and that's the danger zone, that's where you start to put that hard hat back on and everybody yells fore right.

                Okay. So that's a great drill for you guys to try out. I'm going to show you guys one more time. Make sure that you stand right up on this line, okay, toes right up on it, load up to the top, shift left, hit the bag and make sure that that knee does not go in front of the line.

                All right. So now for the over the top shankers. For you guys we can do a very simple drill here and what our, what the objective is is that we're trying to get more of an inside out path. There's a great video on the website that Clay did called the "Over the Top Stick Drill," so you can use that video in conjunction with this drill. This is going to help you work more of an inside out path. It's going to help you keep from spinning everything wide open, get that club throwing away from you and having it being dead across the line into Shankville, Indiana.

                Okay. So when we go ahead and set up here what do we want to do? We want to keep everything regular as far as all of our RST fundamentals with set up and posture. All right. So we're going to take our set up here and then what we're going to do is we're going to drop our right foot straight back. And when I drop this right foot back I'm trying to keep the same amount of width that I had in my normal stance width. Okay. So just guesstimate. You want to have that right foot back behind the left and you want to keep ... this is the most important part of the drill, is that we want to keep both feet very flat on the ground. Okay. If you notice that that right foot comes up, all right, when you get to the top and that right foot comes up, that's going to give you a chance to get everything spinning back open. So your checkpoint is to keep both feet really flat on the ground and you're going to just hit some shots. Okay. So you can't shank it from that direction.

                For those of you that want to try to put more power to this, you're going to run into the opportunity where you can push off that right side and then we're back into that shank territory.

                Okay. So now we've got a three step process that's going to help you correct these shanks and put them to bed and never see them again. Start out, make sure you evaluate your shanks, work on five minutes to perfect release and then try these drills out and never use ... or never have a shank ever again and embarrass yourself and make your friends put their hard hats back on.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Why do I shank?

The first step on how to identify your particular style of shank, whether it is an over the top shank or inside the line shank.  A shank from the inside is a very common area for people that are known as hip spinners, people that like to spin the body wide open and that makes the club come into the plane line shallow.  When the heel of the club is moving across your target line, and your swing is too steep, the outside to in club path is going to cause a over the top shank.

How do you get rid of Shanks forever?

To get rid of the shanks, it starts by determining what kind of shank you have, and that starts with identifying three lines that impact your swing: the tush line, the elbow plane line and the knee line. Step number one to the correction process is to evaluate it and then practicing drills at the driving range to correct the problem, and we’ve got some very effective drills to transform your swing.

How do you stop the shanks in golf?

One of the things that is very common, aside from problems with the release, is that the shoulders like to spin open into impact and they can cause a lot of the shanking problems as well. So to stop both styles of shank, over the top and inside the line, make sure that your shoulders are nice and square at impact.

What causes a shank?

We've got a three step process that's going to help you correct over the top and inside the line shanks and never see them again. Make sure you evaluate your shanks, work on a perfect release and focus on alignment with our drills to help you cure the shanks in 3 easy steps.

 

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