Stop Slicing and Start Releasing the Golf Club

In this video, I’ll show you how to release your club to stop slicing and get better compression and explosive distance. You’ll find out: 1) Why a "body release" requires way too much effort and may cause you to slice your shots, and 2) How “throwing your club” encourages an efficient and powerful release.

  • In Release - Letting Go of Energy From Body Out to Club
  • Releasing Energy Mostly From Right Arm
  • Clubface Will Rotate Independent of Body
  • Releasing w/ Body is More Effort and Slower
  • Left Arm Rotates Through Impact/ Squaring at Impact
  • Right Arm Adds Speed as If Throwing

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James
Hi Craig, been working hard trying to get this post up correct but think I have to accept that I am not going to get that lead leg straight at impact. I have been really trying hard to get this squat to square move right but I feel this causes a big problem with that gammy leg of mine. I get to the squat bit but because I have to push up more in the slightly lower squat position, this is causing issues with that knee and ultimately I do not get to release so well. Have been working all day today on my videos for the review tomorrow. When I do not make an effort to do that squat move, I swing much freer and with a better release. So after a rest at lunch time, I just concentrated in trying to clear that lead hip and posting up at impact. See here the result, albeit with the slightly bent knee. Will up the videos tomorrow.
September 19, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. I know the lead leg is going to cause issues. You don't need a massive squat. As long as the glutes are engaged, weight is shifted, and your hips are moving through the positions we will work with what we have. And, what we have is one of the best impact slides I've seen from you in a real swing.
September 19, 2020
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James
Thanks for your comments Craig and totally accept about that tush line that is really bugging me. To clarify about my squat comment I am referring to creating a bigger angle than 70, i.e. my butt going overly too much into sitting. I the review video I was more focused on the feet and legs and not thinking about squatting. I could not quite discern what the video you referred to in order to delete the squat a bit for me. Was it "Perfect your golf impact - 2 of 4"?
September 22, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. Perfect Your Golf Impact 4 of 4. We are going to need to get that change of direction sooner and the lag increasing so you don't race down the arms and hands. That way we can get a head start on the leg work.
September 22, 2020
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James
LOL I'd only got half way but even that was helpful. Left comment on 4 of 4 and thanks for this. )
September 22, 2020
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James
I have upped my review but one area that I need to sort out, not mentioned in the review, is my tush line. I am aware of losing it and the conundrum of the issues I have with the squat. However, looking at https://rotaryswing.com/golf-instruction-videos/bonus-series-basics/live-online-lessons/live-lesson-tush-line-consistency at the 23.16 part, doing what Chuck said of loading up that lead glute in the way he shows it there, I do find it easier to do and will work on that. Feel that my action of almost litrally sitting into the squat position I have overdone it somewhat by increasing that 70 deg angle in my lead and trail leg in the move forward and is making it so much harder to push that lead heel into the ground to maintain that tush line because of the additional load being placed on that knee. Have already worked on this a bit today and it does seem to impinge on that knee so much. I also stood a tad further from the ball to give me a bit more room. Been working on this and where Chuck shows about lifting his trail foot to indicate the weight on the lead leg is a big, big issue, as doing that causes some pain in my lead femur and do not think I should contemplate doing this. Hope you can figure another way round this. Did a video (no ball) with camera facing lead side and this is a capture at impact.
September 20, 2020
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James
Thank you for your comments in my review Craig and if you look at my comment below regarding regarding what I have been doing in my study, this relates to what you were saying in my review of that laid off club at the top and the fact that I have overly rotated the left arm in the takeaway. This, in my opinion, has created as a habit by practising my swing in my study where if I don't rotate the left arm to create that laid off look I'm going to poke a hole in my study ceiling and V will be really mad :(( now I don't want that so no more attempts with a full swing, even with a wedge, in my study and hopefully I will get out of overly rotating the left arm to create that laid off position at the top. I have the same problem in my garage. Although the garage has a pitched roof, the lower storage area prevents me making a full swing. So dependent on weather it is outside only for full swings, with half swing indoors.
September 9, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. It makes sense with the lower ceilings and having to be a little more careful. I don't think this will be a tough correction. Just going to have to monitor over usage of the arms. Big turn/tiny arm swing!
September 9, 2020
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James
Already been out on my front lawn working on just that. Feeling my Y stays in front of my chest with the right arm extending away from target with the chest and right shoulder pulling behind my head controlling passive arms and I am getting a big turn and swing. Then just before I reach the top I am using the lower body to drive forward with the lead hip rotating my lower body and feel my lead glute is pulling away from target. I hope in the next few days to get a video of this but some work in the garden first planting stuff for next year!
September 9, 2020
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James
I found this a really good video to watch and feel I have made progress in this area. Craig I upped my review and this is a capture of my release compared with Chuck. BTW, I am using my 7 iron here as the grip of my 8 iron has become a bit loose, the grip itself is OK but is moving on the shaft and wonder if this has been affecting my swing as it has been like this for some time. When you look at the review videos I am aware that I still need that right arm to extend a bit more and to delay the wrist cocking a bit, letting the arms and wrist stay more passive and letting the transition create it. I also need to have my body and lead shoulder staying a bit lower as I transit forward and to clear that lead hip more at post up but not sure that to achieve this I will be able to post and straighten that gammy lead leg of mine. When I focus on that I do not seem to be able to release so well. I am much happier with this release here, especially if I can get that lead hand more bowed and the back towards target at impact.
September 7, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. I understand the gammy leg issue. I think that is much improved. We can work on getting the slight more bowed look for you. Glad you caught the issue with the 8 iron. May have been making counter adjustments to not take advantage of the new changes.
September 7, 2020
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James
One of the things I have not been happy with is I feel I swing a bit flat. What is not helping is when I work on my swing in my study, because I do not have a high ceiling there, I have to swing more like that to avoid hitting the ceiling. When I do my dogs upstairs bark like mad and make V very unhappy! So when I practice in there from now on I will have to keep to no more than half swings as it creating a habit I want to get rid of. Been working tonight on my extension, so that when the club is parallel my right arm is in the same position as at address. Checking this in my reflection of my double glass doors and it looks much better, plus no handsy movement as the V of my arms and chest maintain connection.
September 8, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. Yes. And, you can also take note of your elbow positioning. If it starts to fold excessively, or below the lead elbow too much those hands got over active. Much important to not upset dogs or V .
September 9, 2020
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James
Checked this out again this evening, in case I dropped into my old habit, and it still looks good. When the club reaches parallel, the right elbow flex is no different to what it is at address and the trail arm is above the lead arm with maximum distance from my right hip. of the butt of the club. I feel good tension building up on my right thigh and glute, also in the right side of the calf muscle. Regarding control of the club, I feel all my hands and arms are doing is just supporting the club, with the body doing the work.
September 10, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. The notes sound good to me. Body doing the work. Arms just supporting and not manipulating the club around.
September 10, 2020
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James
In addition to what I am doing here Craig I have made some comments on "Golf Backswing Shoulder Plane Drill" video about the feet in the swing that I would appreciate your advice on. It is in conjunction of what is being discussed here. Many thanks.
September 11, 2020
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James
Thanks for the review Craig but do have some words to say about this situation regarding my trail heel at post up. I made a longer comment on Chucks latest video "The Tour Pro Downswing Sequence Drill" about the situation of the trail heel at post up. Even here Chuck certainly lets his heel lift at post up at the 6.32 mark and it is well off the ground when his left arm is parallel to the ground where he is posted up at 6.53 mark and as shown in attached capture. Furthermore, DJ shows clearly his lead heel leaves the ground at post up. I have to admit that this is now causing me to become somewhat confused. If you read my comment in the video mentioned above you will see more of my thoughts.
August 28, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. I will take a look at your other post for further info. The heel will eventually come up. After the club is released and you start going into a full follow thru. The trail foot will roll onto the instep which mean some of that heel will be up. The main point is to try and not push off the heel.
August 28, 2020
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James
I certainly do not try to push off with the trail heel, in fact my focus over recent weeks has been to try and push my lead (left) foot into the ground as I start my transition. I do feel that this action does affect my tush line though, as the harder I push into ground in an effort to make it push that left hip back and away from the ball, I feel my tush line is compromised, plus I feel like I am being prevented from making a bit of a squat and standing up a bit early. Maybe, I exert that pressure into the ground with my lead foot too early. However, doing what Chuck is showing in his latest video "The Tour Pro Downswing Sequence Drill" of letting his heel release from the ground as he comes into post up. If you look at his comment at 17.10 mark where he talks of "by the time you come into the magic box" you can see clearly see his trail heel coming off the ground. Prior to that he demonstrates and talks that even he is guilty of pushing off a bit with his trail foot and goes on to say that providing you do not get into a lateral slide, a little bit of push is OK. As you can see here from a capture of that point in that video compared with his release position from "Golf Downswing, Rotary Golf Downswing Overview" , his left heel is clearly off the ground even before post up. I am not being critical of that movement, in fact as I mentioned in my comment in that latest video, it has helped me and I find I get a much smoother release with my trail leg gliding more effortlessly towards target, whereas trying to maintain the inside of the heel of the trail foot at post up definitely inhibits me from making a smooth effortless swing. It seems to me a slight shift in emphasis in RST about the role of this trail heel/foot. I have no critical comment about this as I think the golf swing is always evolving over time, possibly in this case from the long drive hitters who definitely have their trail heel, even foot come off the ground at post up. It will be interesting though to hear from you on your take on that point.
August 29, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. I know you have a discussion going on with Chuck about the images on the other forum. I will let you continue those talks with him so I don't cloud the view. The vast majority of players push too much off the trail foot. Which is why we have to emphasize so much not to do it. Can you push off the foot for power, etc. Yes. More players way over use this though. If you see in the Throw the Ball Part 2 Video the foot will have to come up a little bit. Chuck's lead side is severely damaged from over the years and he uses sometimes the trail foot to help him move the hips. I know you understand the main goal. Not to over use the right side so much that it cause tush line issues, posture, cast, etc. If it comes off a little bit because you need it to clear the hip because of your left leg/hip issue. I'm not going to yell at you. The only time I get fussy is when I see push that is clearly not being led by the lead side post up. Lead before trail.
August 29, 2020
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Anthony
I believe I hold the club too hard. How soft should the hands, arms and shoulders be. Also is the stance width, 2" outside of NJA determined by the inside of the feet or outside? Cheers.
September 29, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Anthony. The upper half/arms/hands should be fairly relaxed. Most tour pros start at about a 2 at address (1-10 Scale with 1 being the weakest). Take a look at Proper Muscle Activation and My Golf Backswing Secrets. Also, 2 inches outside NJA (hip socket) using the inside of the feet.
September 29, 2018
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Stephen
I have been trying to take right arm out of swing so it is not so dominant , I 'm not trying to push on shaft can you still throw the club correctly at the ball without pushing on the shaft.
September 27, 2018
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Tyler (Certified RST Instructor)
Hi Stephen, the post up move is going to be a driving force of the release. Focus on the left hand and the post up move and once you master those, you can have a better feel for how the right arm can supplement that release. One key of releasing with the right side without pushing is not allowing the right shoulder to drive towards the ball. Once you shoulders are square to the ball, they are done moving.
September 27, 2018
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Mike
Do you have any advice for someone who over-hooks the ball and fights a smother hook when they use this technique?
September 27, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Mike. I would check to make sure your shoulders aren't spinning as you release the club. Quick way to hit a hook. Also, take a look at Flip vs Release and How to Stop Hooking the Ball. It may be attributed to trail side push and spine angle which will be covered in the latter video.
September 27, 2018
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Matt
Great video. The irony is releasing the club is truly releasing the control of the shot. Meaning, it feels like I'm giving up total control to get the pull/pull slice under control. I'm really going to work on this as I feel I'm really making good progress.
May 27, 2017
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Hector
In theory looks easy , but when I try to do it I push with my right foot and also I elevate , loose my tush line and my spine tilt it is lost !!!!
March 1, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Hector. Combine Step 2 - Core Rotation or You Hit the Golf Ball with Your Legs and the Chair Drill. Work on rotating around the spine, less trail side push and posting the lead side back into the chair. Then, add the club with proper release.
March 1, 2017
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Loran
In order not to hit errant shots, I must not lose my tush line, stand out and up my golf stance, and keep both shoulders relatively quiet until after impact? Then, so what is the dominant movement in the golf swing, here?
April 3, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Loan. Yes, you need to stay in your posture, maintain tush line and the shoulders will stay relatively quiet. The dominate move will be the lead arm swing and release. You need to use weight transfer, glutes, obliques and plenty of other muscles to achieve a good swing. But, the lead arm and release will feel more like the dominating force.
April 3, 2016
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Giovanni
Is it possible that setting ball up too high on tee is causing my slice? I hit my long 2/3 hybrids straight along with my 3/4 irons. I hit all my irons straight. When I hit driver I am hitting a nasty slice 90% of the times. Could hitting the ball too high on club head cause the high slice that I am getting? I have a callaway razr fit extreme from 2013. I am not coming over the top in my swing by any means.
September 25, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Giovanni. It would be unlikely that teeing it too high would cause a nasty slice. Unless, when you tee it high. You try to add too much manual launch angle. Which would give you excessive secondary tilt making it hard to release properly.
September 26, 2015
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Jim
For pitch shots do you recommend this kind of release or more of a body release....and is the release for a 5-10 yard pitch the same as for a 40-50 yard pitch?
July 19, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jim. A pitch shot release will be much quieter and more inline with a body release. For 5-10 yards you will tend to hold the face a little more than 40-50 yards. It is the same just a smaller version.
July 20, 2015
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Kyle
Hello, I had this video recommended to me. After practicing it, I still feel a little tension and discomfort in my forarms after I practice. I still don't feel like I'm releasing the club and may still be coming over the top a bit. I am trying to work on swinging and releasing out to the right.
April 4, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Kyle. If you are still struggling with over the top. Take a look at the Over the Top Stick Drill. It will really exaggerate the swinging out to the right and training the club to release.
April 5, 2015
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David
Great video!!!
April 30, 2014

How to Stop Slicing in Golf

Is there anything more frustrating than setting up to your tee shot on the first hole at your favorite golf course and slicing one out of bounds? I mean, everyone is watching, the starter is wondering why you're playing from the back tees, and just to show him you "belong" back there, you put a little extra juice into it, and voila`, you hit a giant slice and lose a golf ball on your first shot of the day.

We've all been there and we've all done it, but why do golfers slice? And more importantly, how do you fix a slice?

The first thing is to understand the common causes of a golf slice. The first and most typical cause is over use of the right side of the body. You see, the muscles that you have loaded up at the top of your golf backswing on the right side are ones that are in a powerful position to steepen the angle of the shaft which is the first step to coming over the top in golf

So, the right side has steepened the angle of the shaft, the next step in slicing is rotate the shoulders aggressively, again, using the right side to "push" during the downswing. This makes the now steepened golf shaft swing on and "over the top" golf swing plane and a slice or a horrendus pull are now inevitable.

To stop slicing and start properly releasing the golf club, we need to first shallow out our golf swing plane. As you can see in the video in the link above, this can be easily done by simply removing the right hand from the golf club completely, which is how you need to start learning what a proper swing plane feels like if you've been swinging over the top. This move will completely transform your swing plane and make it nearly impossible to hit the over the top pull slice golf shot.

As a side benefit, it will dramatically increase your lag as well! A win win for your golf swing!

So we now have a shallowed out swing plane that makes slicing much more difficult, we now need to simply release the golf club and that's what this golf instruction video is all about! So, watch it now to stop slicing forever!

All right, this video is for all you slicers out there and all of you looking to pick up more clubhead speed, and you're really tired of conflicting advice that you hear on the golf channel, and golf magazines and those types Of things about how to release the golf club. I'm gonna show you exactly what a proper release looks like, what it's gonna do for your swing, and I'm gonna show you a couple examples of PGA tour players who do it right, and then a couple who do it differently, and show you what kind of difficulties they're gonna run into.

                The first thing that you need to understand in a release is it's called a golf swing release for a reason. Think about what that means, that word release. Really what we're saying is to let go. When you release something, it has a chance to accelerate freely, independent of the object that's propelling it, right? Simple understanding of that. In this case, when we were talking about the release, a lot of times what we're talking about is the release of the right hand. That's a big part of what I'm gonna focus on here, because most golfers try to get the club to move fast by moving their body very quickly and holding onto the club very tightly, and they don't release it properly, they do what we call a body release.

                What that looks like, is when you take your arms and kinda loomed your ribcage here and turn your body through. What's gonna happen, is your body and the club are going to move at a relatively constant pace together. You can see that the butt of the, or the club head and my chest are moving together. The only way that this club is gonna move very fast is for my body to move really fast. Of course that's a lot of work. Not only that, but your body just simply can't move that fast, so you really cap or put a limit on how fast you can move the golf club.

                By the same token, I can slow my body down and do what's a proper release, what we consider a proper release, an RST, that is rotation of that club and letting it release independent of the body. What we mean by that? Earlier you saw my chest, my buttons on my shirt and the club head moving together. Now watch the buttons on my shirt, and when I rotate my forearms over, notice that my buttons on my shirt are moving really slow, so it's very on my body. But the club head is moving very fast. One's really efficient, one's really inefficient, it's your call.

                You can put a ton of stress on your body, or you can take it easy on your body and let the club move fast and let it work as a tool, the way it was designed to do it. The way it was designed to do it is to rotate. This is a very important piece, and people ask me a lot of times, how I came up with the name rotary swing and why I called it that. Apart from the body rotating, the club is also rotating throughout the swing in a good golf swing. What I mean by that is the club is designed to rotate around the shaft. Otherwise they'd put the shaft in the middle, like a face [inaudible 00:02:49] putter, where you see the putter shaft in the middle, that's designed for more or less straight back and straight through puttering stroke, we don't want the face rotating along.

                In a golf swing, I've never seen a single club with the shaft in the center of the face, it's around the heel. When you put this club on an inclined axis, or inclined plain like you have here, guess what this toe wants to do as it works around the body, it wants to turn over. This is exactly how this club was designed to work. With a lot of golf instructors out there, they are teaching a body release, which is what I was showing you earlier. They're taking the club face and they're holding it square throughout the swing and not allowing it to rotate.

                They think that that's more consistent. It can be in certain ways, and thinking about it, but again, it goes back to efficiency. You saw how slow the club was moving in relationship to my chest. My chest has to be moving really fast for that club to move really fast. And it's also going to predispose me to a typical ball flight. Most golfers who swing like this, unless they have a very very strong grip and come way from the inside, will kinda predispose themselves to hitting a cut. Nothing wrong with that shot whatsoever, but in an ideal world, we want to be able to get a lot of clubhead speed with very little body effort. And in doing so we also want to be able to hit the ball both directions. You want to be able to cut it when you want to, you want to be able to draw when you want to, but you hit it straight.

                When you let your golf club release properly, that opens up all possibilities, because you're now allowing the club to work the way it was designed to work and you're able to get a proper release of the club face and allow it to shut through impact and not worry about your body moving really fast and when you try to hit a draw, you're trying to manipulate this club face the last second. All I'm doing is just altering how fast I'm gonna release the club face when I want to hit a draw. Let's look a little bit more closely at the release of the club. When I'm talking about that, there's a few ways that I typically have my students work on it in the lessons. The first one is I want to really focus on what this left hand is doing. I'm showing you a down the line view, so you can see the toe as it releases here. I'm gonna pull it away from you a little bit so you can see it.

                But the club face is about toed up here at this point. When I'm doing that, and I can do it face on, so you can see a little bit different angle. My left hand is allowing to release and turn over. This is covered in great detail in the five minutes to perfect release video. You need to focus on that, if you struggle with releasing the club properly and getting into a proper impact position, that video covers everything you need to do in a very progressive manner. Once you have that down, now what you want to do is you want to add the right hand to that, and this goes back to us talking about it earlier, and releasing it. Now what I'm gonna do, is I want to speed this up. Now I'm gonna use my right hand to get a little more zip out of it. Now you can see the club is speeding up a little bit more because I'm throwing it, hence the throw the ball drill video. With that right hand, and I'm releasing my right hand. What do I mean by that?

                Well, take a look at VJ and Phil Mickelson and Freddie Couples and watch their trailing hand, what it does through the hitting area a lot of time, is it actually comes off, Ernie Els even does this, to where the hand looks like this. The right hand, the trailing hand is literally releasing the club. That's allowing it to speed up independent of you. What I want you to focus on in this drills, I want you to think about releasing the club. I want you to take that term more literally with your trailing hand, think about allowing the club as if you were gonna throw with the right hand. Don't want you to throw it, but I want you to envision that. I'm gonna show you a video of Tiger in a second, where you can really encapsulate and vision what he's really doing with the club when he's really releasing the club. He's almost, you can imagine letting go, like you were gonna throw the club.

                What that's gonna look like, you can actually do that in the drills, we do that in the five minutes perfect release video. But I want you to just try and think about throwing the club at the ball, like the throw the ball drill. Allowing your hands to turn over, but do this while keeping your hands on, so now I'm envisioning that I'm just throwing my hands, throwing the club and releasing it, covering the things that I've covered in these two videos I mentioned earlier. But I want to start getting to the point where I hold onto the club and keep this right shoulder back as I release it, you can see my right hand is very soft on the club, to the point where I could let go. Now all of a sudden what happens is the club can release and turn over properly very very quickly.

                If you struggle with slicing the golf ball, a lot of times what golfers are doing when they slice, is that they're trying to release the club with their body by turning their body through the hitting area, instead of just letting go. Let the club go, let the club work the way it was designed to work and let the club release. Again, from down the line, I'm just thinking about throwing the club at the ball. If I exaggerate, I actually can let go, and you can see the club face turns over and releases [inaudible 00:07:36] very quickly. I just want to get to the point where I let go of the club and I'm throwing the club at the ball.

                You can see I get a lot of speed with minimal effort. That's what I want you to focus on. If you're slicing, imagine that you're throwing the club, releasing the club head at the ball and letting it rotate through the hitting area, and you'll stop slicing, start to get the club to release and rotate properly through the hitting area. Now let's a couple of looks at a couple of tour players, and look at their swings, how they release the club.

                On the video on the left, we got a great angle, very unique angle of Tiger. What I want you to really focus on here, is particularly his right hand, his right form. As he comes into impact, imagine that he is releasing the club. It's almost like you forgot that he had a golf club in his hand, which is great, because you can't see the golf club. It's like he's throwing something down at the ground. You can see that his right hand is going to turn over his left, and now his knuckles on his left hand are like point down the ground. His right hand is turning over the left. You can see how he's got all this great extension, as if you would throw an object, his arms have extended and formed a straight line with the right arm, and he's rotated the right arm over the left. That's got the club face releasing through the hitting area.

                If we look at VJ here, we can see where he takes it to the extreme and his right hand actually will come off the club. There, you can see how his right wrist is actually in flexion there, because he's actually released it to the extreme and now his club face is pointing down at the ground. Both of these club face, it's hard to see here, Tiger's is blurred, but are pointing left or even down. To contrast that, take a look at this golfer. This golfer is what we consider a body spinner, he's taking his upper body, his shoulders and trying to open them and fire them really hard at the target. He's releasing his body rather than releasing at the club, and then what we'll see in the next frame, rather than having this extension at the width that you see, where Tiger's arms are out of way from his body, the right arm's rotating over the left.

                When we look at this golfer, the next frame, notice that in about the same position, his club face is still wide open, and his hands have already disappeared behind his hips. What's unique about this is that this golfer on the right is not hitting it nearly as far as the golfer on the left or nearly as well, and is working twice as hard to do it, because he's not releasing the golf club. He's actually slowing the release of the club down, slowing the actual club head speed down by holding off the release and trying to turn the body through, while expending 10 times more effort to do so.

                You don't want to have this filling where you're holding the club face off and keeping the club face constant with your chest. You want to have this feeling of Tiger and VJ where they're rotating the club face, releasing it through the hitting area. If you struggle with slicing, then you need to start working on getting this visual into your head where you're using that throw the ball drill, and combine that with the five minutes to perfect release, and you will start to get tons more distance, great compression on the ball and start getting the ball to turn right to left, instead of, and giving it that nasty old slice.

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