Using the Wrists in the Golf Swing

The wrists play a very dynamic role in your golf swing. In this video, I'll cover the terminology and functions of the wrists. I will also cover how to use the wrists in the most effective and efficient way possible.

  • Learn the terms and the functions before you start to practice. 
  • Allow the lead wrist to be in the drivers seat
  • The wrists are always rotating in the swing and providing support to the clubhead
  • Keep the wrists passive until the release point of the swing


Today, in this two-part video, I'm going to go through the terminology of the wrists, and I'm also going to show you how the wrists function throughout the entire golf swing. Let's go ahead and get started.

                Your wrists have several different functions in the golf swing, and in part one of this video I want to go ahead and go through the anatomic terminology and the golf terminology so you understand when you hear us instructing in other videos, you understand what those terms mean. It's going to be very critical for you understand these terms, so when you hear us give you cue words, you know exactly what we're talking about.

                The first function of the wrist is going to be radial deviation. Radial deviation is best defined if you were told your hitchhiker thumb here and try to pull it back to the forearm, that's called cocking of the wrist. The anatomic term is radial deviation, and that's cocking of the wrist in golf terms. Now, the exact opposite of that is ulnar deviation. That would also be defined in the golf term world as un-cocking of the wrist. So you have cocking, radial deviation, un-cocking, ulnar deviation.

                Now, the second function that you'll hear is going to be flexion. Flexion is best defined here ... I'm going to show you the first function of flexion and that's going to be dorsiflexion and that's basically pulling the knuckles on the outer portion of the hand back to the outer portion of the forearm. The golf term for that is going to be either cupping or hinging of the wrists. If you ever hear cupping or hinging, or you hear dorsiflexion, now you understand what that means. The exact opposite of that is going to be palmar flexion. Palmar flexion is basically hinging the wrist inward, or making sure that these fingertips are going to the inner portion of the forearm. The golf term for that for palmar flexion is going to be bowing of the wrists.

                The next function of the wrist is going to be rotation. Rotation is best ... we have the radial distal joint, so if I were to rotate the wrist bones, the forearm actually rotates as well because of the radial distal joint. If I were to hold my forearm or my hand straight out in front of me here and I was to rotate the palm upward, that's what we call supination. The best way how to remember this one is like holding a cup of soup. The exact opposite of that is going to be pronation. That's me turning the palm downward. You can see that the forearm rotates as well. Rotation's a very, very big part of the golf swing and especially rotation of the wrists. In part two of this video I'm going to show you exactly how the wrists are working together to help you get into some great spots.

                The final turn that you're going to hear around the website is wrist set. You'll hear this on TV when the tour analyses are talking about the swings. You'll hear a lot of term about wrist set. The best way I define wrist set is kind of that middle point between dorsiflexion, which is hinging or cupping of the wrist and radial deviation, cocking of the wrist. It's kind of that middle point. I remember that by trying to, if you were to grab a hammer and try to hammer a nail into the wall, your wrist is going to set back into that middle point. If you hear that term wrist set, and that's a very important part throughout the takeaway and into the top part of the golf swing, you're going to understand exactly what that means.

                In part two of this video, I'm going to show you exactly some checkpoints throughout each portion of the golf swing. I'm going to show you how we're going to use them in a passive sense to allow us to build power throughout the golf swing. Then I'm going to show you how to use them to add a lot of speed at the correct time and that's an impact.

                In part two of this video I'm going to talk to you how the wrists work throughout the entire golf swing. I'm going to show you how to use them effectively and efficiently and I'm going to also make you understand that there's a difference between power and speed. The wrists can add a lot of speed to the golf swing, yes, but the power is what we want to build early on and we want to turn that into speed through the wrists later in the golf swing. I don't want you to use the wrists. The best way to think about this is using the wrists very little early on and using them to add impact at the proper time. When you ever hear us say use the wrists in a passive sense, that's what that means.

                You can see here, from a setup position, I can make this club head move really fast with very little rotation of the body, you can see that that club's got a lot of speed in it. That's one of the big mistakes that we see with a lot of our golfers around the site or a lot of our students, is that you'll see them get the club moving really quickly without creating any rotation. You can see that I've moved this club four or five feet with just a little bit of rotation of the wrists, a little bit of set of the wrists and it's got a lot of speed early on. What that's doing is it's making your primary power source, your hands and your arms. The whole idea is that we want to use the body to build power. We can do that by rotating, loading up those big muscles and then unloading that and then pulling the power out of the ground and then turning that into speed at impact.

                I'm going to show you exactly the best way to think about how to use your wrists. We're going to be focusing more on the movements of the body. There's a lot of instructors out there that'll tell you, "Okay all you've got to do is get the toe of the club up to the sky and you're in good shape." Again, from the face on perspective, I've got the toe of the club up to the sky here but I haven't rotated my body at all. We're going to shift our focus off the club head and we're going to focus on what the wrists are doing because the left wrist, or your lead wrist in your golf swing, is really the driver of your car. I call him the conservative brother, always shows up to the party on time, where the right hand is the out of control brother that shows up to the party, ruins it. This guy's going to be adding speed, so we want this guy to be in control for a while. We want this guy to add the speed at the proper time, that's at impact.

                If we shift our focus off the golf club, and I'm going to use a tennis racket and I want you to think about the front part of this tennis racket here that's going to be facing down the line as the club face. If I'm in address position here, I'm going to let the driver of my car be the only person in the car at this point. The passenger, I kicked him out for a while. You'll notice here that my glove logo, or my watch is facing down the target line. When I start the golf club back, or the tennis racket back throughout the takeaway, you're going to notice that there's some rotation of the wrists. We always want the wrists to be rotating. The left wrist is pronating and there's going to be a little bit of set at the end.

                Why do we have wrist set? Wrist set is that one term that we talked about in the first part of the video and that's going to be to support the golf club. When we're working through the takeaway, if I didn't have any wrist set, this club head becomes really heavy and it's lagging way down here and it's really uncomfortable. Wrist set is just basically to support the club. All we're looking for is enough wrist set to where the club shaft is going to be parallel to the ground. I didn't really aim the tennis racket or I didn't aim the club in a certain area. All I did was just focused on my lead wrist rotating. My focus is, now my watch is facing away from me and there's a little bit of wrist set. Also, at the address position, we start with a little cupping and as we're starting to rotate back, you're going to notice that a little bit of that cupping comes out. Eventually when we start to work up into the top part of the golf swing, you're going to notice that it flattens out.

                If I were to add the right hand back to the mix and I'm not grabbing the club very hard here, or grabbing the tennis racket, the right wrist is just reacting, in a sense, to what the left wrist is doing because we want that to be in control. That's the most important part of golf is being able to control the club face. Once you've trained your wrists, add the golf club back to the mix. Just try to feel those movements. Don't focus on the golf club itself. Focus more here than out here. If that's where you focus, that's going to help you build new movement patterns much quicker. Now, when we start to work from the takeaway, this wrist is going to continue to rotate and it's going to flatten off. The reason why it flattens off again, because that club head's gotten heavy and its got a lot of momentum in it. It's going to be pulling in that direction. The right wrist is actually going to add a little bit more set at the top part of the golf swing.

                Left wrist is rotated. It's going to continue to rotate and it flattens off because that club head becomes heavy, that right wrist has got a little bit more wrist set in it. Maybe just a fraction more hinge in it. That's all we're looking for is just enough to support it. We don't want the wrist to be really rigid throughout any part of the takeaway or the backswing, or any part of the golf swing for that matter. We want them to be in a passive sense. We want them to be nice and relaxed and just enough to support the club. On a scale of one to ten, I usually tell people between a four and five is the best way to think about grip pressure. That effects the way the wrists function. If you were to squeeze the life out of it, then it's hard to rotate. The wrists are nice and passive, add the right hand back to the mix and then we're going to start to work up to the top part of the golf swing.

                On my wrist watch, if you watch my watch here, now it's rotated to where it's more facing up at the sky and that it's just resting in the right hand. Don't squeeze the club to where it's got tons of tension in it, where you've got the wrist really, fully maxed out because if you have the wrist really maxed out at the top part of the golf swing, guess what? They're going to throw very early on and you're going to have a hard time maintaining lag. You're going to have a hard time putting speed in the right spot. I really just want enough set in there to help hold and support the club. There's a great drill on the website called the down-cock and pump drill. Check that out. That will help you understand how much set or how much tension levels should be in the wrist.

                What are the wrists doing in the downswing? They're not doing much at all. All the left wrist did to get to the top part of the golf swing, remember that's the driver of our car, is it just rotated. That's all it's really going to be doing on the way down. We don't want to try to push against the shaft with the thumb. We don't want to try to push against the club with the right arm. That's a very common mistake and that's why get a lot of early casting. It's very difficult to maintain lag in the hitting area. All we really want to think about is rotation, so the left wrist is pronating on the way back. It's going to be supinating on the way down. The right wrist, again, is just reacting to what the left wrist is doing. From a down the line perspective, when I get up into the top part of my golf swing here and I sit left and I'm starting to work, I don't want the hands and arms doing really much of anything.

                The rotation created by the body is moving the hands and arms back out in front. I'm still being able to maintain the lag in the golf club. You can see I've got quite an angle here and now my hands are in the hitting area to where I can release that energy, just as outlined in Five Minutes to a Perfect Release. The most critical part for you to understand is that your lead wrist in your golf swing is the driver of your car. We want that guy to be in control. It's always got to be rotating. It's got to have enough wrist set. It's just got to have enough set at the checkpoint of the takeaway just to get the club shaft where it's parallel and then at the top part of the golf swing, we want to save just a little bit of wrist set so when you have that down-cock, you can create more of an angle to hang on for more speed.

                As outlined in Five Minutes to a Perfect Release, you're going to notice that the left wrist is just rotating. Now you can see that my glove logo or my watch is facing behind me. Back at impact, we've got it slightly back to a flat position, glove logo's facing down the line. The right wrist is just rotating, helping add that speed. The speed is not coming from the hand, the speed is coming from the release of the angle here in the wrist and the release here in the arm. That's what I want you to best think about. That's how the passenger, the brother that always shows up late, is helping add that speed down there. Now that you understand how the wrists are supposed to work, use them in a passive sense, build power in the body, turn them into speed at the right time.

                I look forward to working with you guys in the future and I hope you have a great day. 

Your wrists play a very dynamic role in the golf swing. Today, in this two part video, I'm going to go through the terminology of the wrists, and I'm also going to show you how the wrists function throughout the entire golf swing. Let's go ahead and get started.

                Your wrists have several different functions in the golf swing. In part one of this video, I want to go ahead and go through the anatomic terminology and the golf terminology, so that you understand when you hear us instructing in other videos, you understand what those terms mean. It's going to be very critical for you to understand these terms, so when you hear us give you cue words, you know exactly what we're talking about.

                The first function of the wrists is going to be radial deviation. Radial deviation is best defined if you were to hold your hitchhiker thumb up here, and try to pull it back to the forearm, that's called cocking of the wrist. The anatomic term is radial deviation, and that's cocking of the wrist in golf terms. The exact opposite of that is going to be ulnar deviation. That would also be defined, in the golf term world, as uncocking of the wrists. You have cocking, radial deviation. Uncocking, ulnar deviation.

                The second function that you'll hear is going to be flexion. Flexion is best defined here, or I'm going to show you the first function of flexion, and that's going to be dorsiflexion. That's basically pulling the knuckles on the outer portion of the hand back to the outer portion of the forearm. The golf term for that is going to be either cupping or hinging of the wrist. If you ever hear cupping or hinging, or you hear dorsiflexion, now you understand what that means.

                The exact opposite of that is going to be palmar flexion. Palmar flexion is basically hinging the wrist inward, or making sure that these fingertips are going to the inner portion of the forearm. The golf term for that, for palmar flexion, is going to be bowing of the wrist. The next function of the wrist is going to be rotation. Rotation is best, and we have the radial distal joint, so if I were to rotate the wrist bones, the forearm actually rotates as well, because of the radial distal joint.

                If I were to hold my forearm or my hand straight out in front of me here, and I was to rotate the palm upward, that's what we call supination. The best way how I remember this one is like holding a cup of soup. The exact opposite of that is going to be pronation. That's me turning the palm downward. You can see that the forearm rotates as well. Rotation's a very, very big part of the golf swing, and especially rotation of the wrists. In part two of this video, I'm going to show you exactly how the wrists are working together to help you get into some great spots.

                The final term that you're going to hear around the website is wrist set. You'll hear this on TV when the tour analysis are talking about the swings. You'll hear a lot of terms about wrist set. The best way I define wrist set is kind of that middle point between dorsiflexion, which is hinging or cupping of the wrist, and radial deviation, cocking of the wrist. It's kind of that middle point. I remember that by trying to ... If you were to grab a hammer, and try to hammer a nail into the wall, your wrist is going to set back into that middle point.

                If you hear that term, wrist set, and that's a very important part throughout the take away and then the top part of the golf swing, you're going to understand exactly what that means. In part two of this video, I'm going to show you exactly some check points throughout each portion of the golf swing. I'm going to show you how we're going to use them in a passive sense to help us, or allow us to build power throughout the golf swing, and then I'm going to show you how to use them to add a lot of speed at the correct time, and that's at impact.

                In part two of this video, I'm going to talk to you how the wrists work throughout the entire golf swing. I'm going to show you how to use them effectively and efficiently, and I'm going to also make you understand that there's a difference between power and speed. The wrists can add a lot of speed to the golf swing, yes, but the power is what we want to build early on, and we want to turn that into speed through the wrists late on the golf swing.

                I don't want you to use the wrists. The best way to think about this is using the wrists very little early on, and using them at impact, at the proper time. When you ever hear us say use the wrists in a passive sense, that's what that means. You can see here, from a setup position, I can make this club head move really fast, with very little rotation of the body. You can see that that club's got a lot of speed in it, and that's one of the things ...

                The big mistakes that we see with a lot of our golfers around the site, or a lot of our students, is that you'll see them get the club moving really quickly without creating any rotation. You can see that I've moved this club four or five feet with just a little bit of rotation to the wrists, a little bit of set of the wrists, and it's got a lot of speed early on. What that's doing is it's making your primary power source your hands and your arms. The whole idea is that we want to use the body to build power.

                We can do that by rotating, loading up those big muscles, and then unloading that, and then pulling the power out of the ground, and then turning that into speed at impact. I'm going to show you exactly the best way to think about how to use your wrists. We're going to be focusing more on the movements of the body. There's a lot of instructors out there that'll tell you, "Okay. All you gotta do is get the toe of the club up to the sky, and you're in good shape." Again, from the face on perspective, I've got the toe of the club up to the sky here, but I haven't rotated my body at all.

                We're going to shift our focus off the club head, and we're going to focus on what the wrists are doing, because the left wrist, or your lead wrist in your golf swing, is really the driver of your car. I call him the conservative brother, always shows up to the party on time, where the right hand is the out of control brother that shows up to the party, ruins it, and this guy's going to be adding speed. We want this guy to be in control for a while. We want this guy to help add the speed at the proper time. That's at impact.

                If we shift our focus off the golf club, and I'm going to use a tennis racket. I want you to think about the front part of this tennis racket here that's going to be facing down the line as the club face. All right, so if I'm in a [inaudible 00:05:18] position here, I'm going to let the driver of my car be the only person in the car at this point. The passenger, I kicked him out for a while. You'll notice here that my glove logo, or my watch, is facing down the target line.

                When I start the golf club back, or the tennis racket back throughout the takeaway, you're going to notice that there's some rotation of the wrists. We always want the wrists to be rotating. The left wrist is pronating, and there's going to be a little bit of set at the end. Why do we have wrist set? Wrist set is that one term that we talked about in the first part of the video, and that's going to be to support the golf club. When we're working through the takeaway, if I didn't have any wrist set, this club head becomes really heavy, and it's lagging way down here, and it's really uncomfortable.

                Wrist set is just basically to support the club. All we're looking for is enough wrist set to where the club shaft is going to be parallel to the ground. I didn't really aim the tennis racket, or I didn't aim the club in a certain area. All I did was just focus on my lead wrist rotating. My focus is ... Now my watch is facing away from me, and there's a little bit of wrist set. We start also, at the addressed position, we start with a little cupping, and as we're starting to rotate back, you're going to notice that a little bit of that cupping comes out.

                Eventually, when we start to work up into the top part of the golf swing, you're going to notice that it flattens out. If I were to add the right hand back to the mix, and I'm not grabbing the club very hard here, or grabbing the tennis racket, the right wrist is just reacting in a sense to what the left wrist it doing. We want that to be in control. That's the most important part of golf, is being able to control the club face. Once you've trained your wrists, add the golf club back into the mix. Okay?

                Just try to feel those movements. Don't focus on the golf club itself. Focus more here than out here. If that's where you focus, that's going to help you build new movement patterns much quicker. Now, when we start to work from the takeaway, this wrist is going to continue to rotate, and it's going to flatten off. The reason why it flattens off again, because that club head's started ... It's gotten heavy, and it's got a lot of momentum in it, and it's going to be pulling in that direction, so the right wrist is actually going to add a little bit more set at the top part of the golf swing.

                Left wrist is rotated. It's going to continue to rotate, and it flattens off. Because that club head becomes heavy, that right wrist has got a little bit more wrist set in it, maybe just a fraction more hinge in it. All right, so that's all we're looking for, is just enough to support it. We don't want the wrists to be really rigid throughout any part of the takeaway or the backswing, or any part of the golf swing for that matter. We want them to be in a passive sense. We want them to be nice and relaxed, and just enough to support the club.

                On a scale of 1-10, I usually tell people between a four and five is the best way to think about grip pressure that affects the way the wrists function. If you were to squeeze the life out of it, then it's hard to rotate. All right, so the wrists are nice and passive. Add the right hand back to the mix, and then we're going to start to work up to the top part of the golf swing. On my wrist watch, if you watch my watch here, now it's rotated to where it's more facing up at the sky, and then it's just resting in the right hand.

                Don't squeeze the club to where it's got tons of tension in it, where you've got the wrists really, fully maxed out. If you have the wrists really maxed out at the top part of the golf swing, guess what, they're going to throw very early on, and you're going to have a hard time maintaining lag. You're going to have a hard time putting speed in the right spot. I really just want enough set in there to help hold and support the club. There's a great drill on the website called the Downcock and Pump Drill. Check that out. That'll help you understand how much set or how much tension levels should be in the wrists.

                What are the wrists doing in the downswing? They're not doing much at all. All the left wrist did to get to the top part of the golf swing, remember that's the driver of our car, is it just rotated. That's all it's really going to be doing on the way down. We don't want to try to push against the shaft with the thumb. We don't want to try to push against the club with the right arm. That's a very common mistake, and that's why we get a lot of early casting. It's very difficult to maintain lag in the hitting area.

                All we really want to think about is rotation. The left wrist is pronating on the way back. It's going to be supinating on the way down. The right wrist, again, is just reacting to what the left wrist is doing. From a down the line perspective, when I get up into the top part of my golf swing here, and I sit left, and I'm starting to work, I don't want the hands and arms doing really much of anything. The rotation created by the body is moving the hands and arms back out in front.

                I'm still being able to maintain the lag in the golf club. You can see I've got quite an angle here. Now my hands are in the hitting area to where I can release that energy, just as outlined in Five Minutes to a Perfect Release. The most critical part for you to understand is that your lead wrist, in your golf swing, is the driver of your car. We want that guy to be in control. It's always got to be rotating. It's got to have enough wrist set.

                It's just got to have enough set at the checkpoint of the takeaway, just to get the club shaft to where it's parallel. Then at the top part of the golf swing, we want to save just a little bit of wrist set, so when you have that downcock, you can create more of an angle to hang on for more speed. All right, so as outlined in Five Minutes to a Perfect Release, you're going to notice that the left wrist is just rotating. Now you can see that my glove logo, or my watch, is facing behind me.

                Back at impact. Okay. We've got it slightly back to a flat position. Glove logo's facing down the line. All right, and the right wrist is just rotating and helping add that speed. The speed is not coming from the hand. The speed is coming from the release of the angle here in the wrist, and the release here in the arm. That's what I want you to best think about. That's how this right guy, or I'm sorry, the passenger, the brother that always shows up late, is helping add that speed down there.

                Now that you understand how the wrists are supposed to work, use them in a passive sense. Build power in the body. Turn them into speed at the right time. I look forward to working more with you guys in the future, and I hope you have a great day. 

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64x64
Miroslav
Hi, can we get link for second part of this video like he mentioned? Thank you
May 1, 2021
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Miroslav. This is the two part video put into one cut.
May 3, 2021
64x64
Mike
Hello. Thanks for help. As I shift weight and squat .my wrists load for a split second and as I push off ground to post up my wrists really snap tha club into impact. I am supposed to feel that correct? I can really feel the torque in my driver. Advise please. Thank you for your time. Mike
March 27, 2021
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Mike. Yes. The weight shift/transition will increase the lag angle and then you post to start trigger the release of those puppies. Take a look at Tour Pro Downswing Sequence Drill Video.
March 28, 2021
64x64
Mehul
Can you please send me the link to the 'downcock pump drill' mentioned in this video? Thanks
November 17, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Mehul. If you type "downcock" in the search box the video will populate first on the list.
November 17, 2020
64x64
Jaey
Great video ... Please clarify, why does RST recommend a cupped/hinged left wrist at set up/ takeaway ... just to extend/straighten/flatten the left wrist at top of takeaway and impact? Seems like an extra move. Why not grip with an extended/straight/flat left wrist at set up (same as impact position), cock slightly during back swing and just keep one wrist set throughout the swing. I'm sure you have a easy answer. Love the DEAD drill. Thank you.
April 15, 2020
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jaey. If you start with a slightly cupped wrist (because the grip is slightly stronger than neutral) if you flatten it to start the swing the club will go inside. If you cock/hinge slightly back it tends to close the club-face and get you across the line. Take a look at How to Fix an Inside Takeaway and Wrist Cock vs Wrist Hinge. Remember, address is static and impact dynamic. You don't want to preset your dynamic position.
April 15, 2020
64x64
Jaey
I've been practicing your reply which was excellent. These IMMEDIATE answers to our nuanced questions are a wonderful resource that adds tremendous value to our learning. I get "stuck" on a concept and need just a little clarification to move forward. Thank you!
April 16, 2020
64x64
Sam
Do you add any support on the back swing with the right hand/wrist? Does the right hand help with the gradual wrist set? The weight of the club head during the back swing is hard to support with just the left hand/wrist and I have the tendency to go inside. If I am able to get the back swing positions all correct slow, should I try a faster pace to use momentum to take the club up? Thanks for any insight.
February 18, 2019
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Sam. Take a look at My Golf Backswing Secrets. Momentum will help carry you to the top, but you don't need excessive pace to do so. The trail arm/hand will help with support in the backswing. The key is to not dominant the backswing motion using solely the trail arm/hand. Both arms/hands have a role to perform.
February 18, 2019
64x64
Mikko-Pekka
Hi RST! First post of this year! In my review Chuck mentioned that I am a little floppy with my wrists on top of the backswing. I am not even sure what Chuck meant but are there drills/thoughts to overcome this issue? I have a pretty strong left hand grip. I think being floppy has something to do with my slight overswing.
January 28, 2019
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Mikko. Happy First Post! Being too strong and getting the wrong placement may lead to a little of your floppiness at the top. I would try adjusting the grip a tad weaker. Let's start there first.
January 28, 2019
64x64
James
Hi Craig having just watched Veronica's review there has been a misunderstanding regarding the part I referred to Veronica getting her club parallel to ground. I was referring to, as I have pointed out in a previous review, the beginning of the takeway when the hands have reached about thigh height. In the video at 7.50 the part Chris refers to the wrists being passive with just enough set and rotation that the shaft is parallel to the ground. It is not at the top of the backswing as you correctly said the shaft should never be parallel to the ground, which we understand. When Veronica's hands reach thigh height because her wrists are overly passive, do not set at all by the time the hands are one foot away from the right thigh. In Veronica's case the shaft is approximately 45 deg down to the ground with the club head no more than a foot above the ground which tends to make the club a lot heavier because she has not exercised any wrist set as Chris points out.
October 25, 2018
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. Yes. In the takeaway at trail pocket height you should have the club parallel to the ground and 25% of your wrist set. Veronica does need to improve with some gradual set. Use the RST Pencil Tee Drill to help.
October 25, 2018
64x64
James
Actually Craig correct me if I am wrong. Having reached the parallel position as Chris has, if you hold the wrist set without altering the arms and just turn the shoulders back to address position, the club is in the forward shaft lean position as required to achieve the dynamic loft.
October 25, 2018
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. You would achieve almost the same lean position. However, the wrist position wouldn't be the same. There will be more ulnar deviation and the lead wrist would be anatomically flat/slightly bowed.
October 25, 2018
64x64
James
Yes I accept that; it was the lean of the shaft I was referring to, which I found interesting. As you correctly state it is the wrist position that changes. BTW, I did not realise you have to have medical background to be a golf pro!! LOL. Ulnar, I had look that up to find that it is the long bone that stretches from the elbow to the little finger. And when in anatomical position, is found on the medial side of the forearm. Strikes me there is more golf than I thought! BG
October 25, 2018
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. It's the body that moves the club . How can one know how to move the club correctly if they don't understand how the body moves. Food for thought.
October 25, 2018
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Nancy
When exactly do you start setting your wrists in the takeaway? I understand that a full wrist set should happen gradually, but when does it start? I don't consciously think about setting my wrists in the takeaway at all, and I feel them starting to set when my right arm starts to fold later in the backswing (which I understood to be the RST method until I saw this video)... just saw a video of my swing and noticed that I don't set my wrists at all during the takeaway, which I believe causes the clubhead to travel too low and inside during the takeaway. How should a proper wrist set feel to someone like me who delays it too much? Thx!
July 2, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Nancy. Go to the 5 Minutes to the Perfect Takeaway about 22 minutes in to see the addition of wrist set and when. Tough to teach how it would feel for you, but it will probably feel much exaggerated.
July 2, 2018
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MICHAEL
Hi, odd question, but ive somehow injured my left wrist playing golf. If feels like its in the back of the wrist and its sore when i hinge my wrist back. I feel like ive done this in the golf release. Is this as a result of being too right hand dominant?
February 16, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Michael. Being trail hand dominant can definitely cause lead wrist issues.
February 17, 2018
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Michael
Craig's Pencil Drill combined with this Wrist video is a perfect combination. Rotating the left forearm and proper body turn gets the pencil to the perfect pocket high position.
September 6, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Michael. Glad you liked both videos. Now, don't go nuts with rotation. It is only slight to reach optimal position.
September 6, 2017
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Fred
Chris, been working on starting downswing before finishing backswing since my Aug 12 review. I was incredible for a while, but did not keep it up more than about a week. Found that I was not consistently taking a full BkSw. Got too involved thinking about height of arms and have refocused on lower body to rip into dnsw. Looking forward to next review so you can confirm whether I'm on the right track.
August 21, 2017
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Okay Fred, thanks for the info and looking forward to working with you on your next review.
August 21, 2017
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Fred
Chris, re my review of Oct 15, 2020. I believe my right shoulder is slowing due to my being focused on getting the arms to a particular position and avoiding the wrists cocking further. In drills and at the range, I believe I've corrected this by just turning the right shoulder back and letting the arms follow, but making sure not to let the wrists cock. Will keep that up. Question re arms getting in front of body too soon. Is this due to the swing shape of drop arms to right thigh area then swing in an sorta horizontal arc to release over in the left thigh area? In looking for this, I think it could be said another way, that the shouldeers are squaring in the down swing too soon and I need to have them more closed going into contact. It seems to me that visualizing the club falling from the top directly to the ball rather than falling to the right thigh area would be an improvement. Haven't tried this except in ball less drills. Your comments requested (right, wrong, too simple of a description)?
October 18, 2020
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hi Fred, Sounds like you are onto something there for sure. The wrists can and will cock/set in the takeaway and backswing, but working to minimize wrist function in your case will certainly help promote more body turn. The arms moving out in front too much is a result of you not having enough turn going back to add depth to the swing arc. Once you get closer to 90 degrees and you try to keep the shoulders closed while shifting left, the arms should slowly work back out in front of the body on the way down providing you are keeping the arms relaxed. I like the visual of the arms falling better than the club but again, you need to make sure you have enough body turn going back or the position of the arms in shoulders in the downswing will always be a little out of sorts and require a compensation of some sort to shallow out the plane.
October 19, 2020
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Ms Terry
I am trying to get the part 2 video using your wrists by Chris Tyler and I can't find it. Can you please help. Thank you
July 19, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ms Terry. If you are a Premium Member. I believe the video above is Part 1 and 2 combined.
July 19, 2017
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Erinn
To confirm, the left (lead) wrist needs to be flat/bowed when you cock and not cupped like a baseball swing?
July 13, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Erinn. You will gradually lose the cupping in the wrist throughout the backswing. As you cock the wrist the cupping will start to diminish and the wrist should be flat at the top.
July 13, 2017
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ROBERT
As I bring my club down to my trail thigh area, I consciously bow my left wrist which has really helped keep my irons square at impact. However, my driver always seem more open at impact for the same feeling. Does the driver, and perhaps longer clubs in general, need less bowing of the lead wrist going into impact?
March 21, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Robert. You don't have to bow the lead wrist as much with a driver. Also, make sure you adjust the ball position and axis tilt (Proper Tee Height Video).
March 22, 2017
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GC
Does a stronger left hand grip promote more of a natural cup in wrist? If I hook the ball a lot, does it make sense to have a more neutral grip and cup slightly more at the top of the back swing only?
March 11, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello GC. Yes, a stronger lead hand will promote more cupping. If you tend to hook. I would shy away from excessive cupping. Gradual set and loss of cupping from the takeaway to the top. However, if the wrist tends to bow from a more neutral grip with a shut club face. You could also start hooking the ball.
March 11, 2017
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GC
I have a big hook on my shots. If I cup my left wrist at the top (using my third forth and fifth finger and wrist) I find it easier to create extra cock in the overall wrist. The cupping naturally disappears and activates my left arm muscle - then I feel I get a better inside to outside swing. Then as I turn the arm just before impact I also have better lag? Make sense? For somebody who hooks the ball so much does cupping the wrist make sense? I also don't feel loss of power as I create better downcock?
March 11, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello GC. It sounds like a lot of wrist manipulation. If the wrist is slightly cupped at the top due to a stronger grip. That would be fine. But, I wouldn't strive to forced cupping.
March 11, 2017
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David
The momentum of my backswing always causes my wrists to break down at the top of my swing, causing the angle of my left wrist to max out past 90 degrees, leading to casting at the beginning of the downswing. I know what to do but can't seem to stop it despite trying many of the drills on the site. Anything you can suggest to help?
February 9, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello David. Do you break them down too much on one armed swings?
February 10, 2017
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David
It is much less pronounced in my left wrist with left arm only swings.
February 12, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello David. Sounds like a trail arm control problem. Make sure the trail arm doesn't bend more than 90 degrees first.
February 12, 2017
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Ian
I understand the principle of wrist rotation and set. What I am not clear on is whether this is achieved through concious movement of the wrists or staying sufficiently relaxed for the weight of the golf club to move the wrists into the correct position. I have tried both with varying degrees of success. Instuctors I have had in the past have never given me a clear answer. Which should it be? Ian
January 13, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ian. Some players have to consciously train the wrist positions to delete or remove old trained motor patterns. The overall goal is that you are using the core, weight shift and relaxed arms to allow the club to swing through the proper positions.
January 13, 2017
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Dennis
Chris, As a life long flipper of the golf club I have recently been looking to purchase the Impact Snap training aid. I wanted to know what your opinion was on the training aid. Thanks Dennis
November 22, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dennis. The training aid I've heard is a good tool. But, it has to be used properly. As long as you don't rely on the training aid to create the new position and you are mapping out how you are getting there through proper movement patterns. I don't think it would inhibit your progress.
November 22, 2016
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William J
I have struggled to obtain a flat wrist at impact much less a bowed wrist. It has alway been slightly cupped at impact. I have found through trail and error that IF my left wrist is in a full ulnar deviation position I can get my left wrist flat at impact. An observation concerning this: I have never found any video which mentions this (ulnar deviation) nor in the Level 1 Certification Manual. I did happen to read a comment/question below which asked about if the left wrist was suppose to be fully in the ulnar deviation position at impact though. While practicing this I have noticed that in my full swing video that after impact my arms/club shaft are further away from my body. Is this correct and if so, is it because of the forces which are created? When i practice I use a camera and monitor. The monitor is positioned directly in front of me. I use a line on the monitor to represent the plane line (hosel through the bottom of elbow) so i can insure that my practice is correct when viewed from DTL. During the downswing the club head/shaft stays on the plane line and the club head bisects the right forearm as it approaches the ball so I don't think that I'm coming in to steep. Thanks for your time.
September 29, 2016
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Jeff, yes, you will see the hands very slightly further way and very slightly above where they started, due to the centrifugal force created. Shaft droop will help make sure the club is flat and square at impact. The rest of your post sounds like you are in a great direction for sure. Full ulnar deviation at impact will be achieved by the lack of tension and the weight of the club pulling the wrists into this position. Hope that helps.
October 1, 2016
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William J
Great. Thanks for your reply Chris. Would you elaborate on how much would be excessive in regards to the hands being too far outside of where they started and what effect that would have on the ball flight etc.? I am working hard on getting the weight back on the lead leg early in the backswing/hips square/posting up and allowing the club head do the work for me. Also a lot of left arm drills to help me learn to keep the right side out of it. Yeah, tension is definitely a killer. I really didn't understand just how much until I attended the clinic around Easter of this year. Cheers!
October 1, 2016
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Jeff, I assume you mean the hands being more outside on the downswing? If so, a good checkpoint is to make sure the hands are in line with the sternum after you make shift to the lead side. You can also use an elbow plane line and do some comparison work from down the line in the self analysis tool with a model swing loaded. Tension is hard to get rid of for sure. Stay focused and you will get it!!! Good luck and let me know if you need anything at all.
October 2, 2016
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Greg
Hi Chris, great video! I've struggled for years with the grip end of the club at impact swiping against the inside of my right forearm, about 4 inches above my wrist. I typically set up at address with my wrists fully in ulnar-deviation. Would this be a major cause for my problem or at least a part of it? Also trying hard to keep my wrists passive.
September 18, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Greg. Yes, setting up in full ulnar-deviation could create the issue of scrapping the forearm. Use the Golf Grip Checkpoint Tips Video, Common Golf Setup Faults and Fixes, and How Far to Stand from the Ball to help.
September 19, 2016
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Loran
My guess is then the right wrist does the major and main work on the downswing, but not all the way to the top of the swing--that job is the left wrist?
August 23, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Loan. The trail wrist will help support the club at the top and transitioning into the downswing.
August 24, 2016
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Loran
The power house are the abs and torso? What about the lower body? The thighs or legs?
August 23, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Loan. The abs, torso, and glutes will be your powerhouse.
August 24, 2016
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TOM
In the most recent Golf Magazine, Kevin Kisner starts his take away by pushing his right hand down on top of his left thumb. They state it helps to create more width. Is this sound advice?
May 18, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Tom. Ideally, we don't want the hands over active at the beginning of the swing. Sometimes pushing the trail hand down on the shaft will lead to a closed takeaway and inhibit forearm rotation.
May 19, 2016
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David
Hi, This is a great video - every credit to Chris. You can alway's depend on RST to give you detailed and clear explanations backed by great building drill's. I must say the fact as Chris stater that the left wrist is alway's rotating was a revelation to me as my thought on the downswing was to get to the delivery position and then consciously start the rotation as I associated this with giving extra speed into impact. As you can imagine this was more often than not a bit late so the club face would tend to be a bit open. Using this thought with the Perfect Impact Series I can get perfect contact using 1/4 swings with full extension's back and through. I look forward to working this into the full swing. Great job guy's.
May 18, 2016
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Thanks very much David and glad to hear that you found this video to be useful. Keep us posted on your progress.
May 18, 2016
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William
Great video Chris and all @ TeamRotary! I've always been 'cuppy' and a flipper - both go hand in hand, pardon the pun. I'll be uploading some videos of my swing shortly and it'll be interesting to see what I couldn't seem to understand when my instructor Steve Maes was saying when he was trying to 'flatten me out'... Thanks, William
May 15, 2016
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Thanks William...always love to hear your feedback and we thank you for being such a great supporter of RST.
May 15, 2016
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Brian
Would the right shoulder blade glide performed currently eliminate the need to focus on left wrist doing takeaway. Other then keeping them soft.
March 27, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Brian. You want to pull the trail shoulder blade back in the takeaway. However, some players will hold the lead wrist/forearm and not allow it to rotate. Just monitor that you don't inhibit proper lead wrist motion. But, yes focusing on proper trail side usage can eliminate some lead side thought about moving the club back.
March 28, 2016
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Loran
Why the need just to focus on the hands on the end butt of the club in the takeaway and not the entire club? Will that lead to too large an arc that promotes overswinging on the top swing? Where is the video that emphasizes when the arms reach parallel they have to be perpendicular simultaneously on the way to the backswing?
February 22, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Loan. The Perfecting Impact Part 4 and Using the Wrist Part 5 will help with the parallel arm and wrist set. If you focus too much on the club you will tend to try and move the club head. Therefore, placing the positions versus taking care of the body positions to move the club. The club goes where your body puts it, not the body goes where you put the club head.
February 23, 2016
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Loran
Then, the left wrist is the lead driver? Therefore, the wrist lag grip has the strongest pressure on the downswing? The arms coming down from the top of the backswing are more soft than both wrists?
January 17, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Loan. The lead arm/wrist will be the driver of your "car" on the downswing. Yes, the typically tour pro grip pressure wise will start at a 2 and increase to an 8 by impact. The wrist won't be locked or stiffer than the lead arm coming down. You don't want to create excess tension. The wrist will start to feel some load on the downswing, but that doesn't necessarily mean it will feel tenser than the lead arm.
January 18, 2016
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Claus
For me it is he opposite: left wrist bowed so that face totally shut (and no real clue how to avoid it). should wrists be "soft" or actively setting? How about grip pressure - will loosen the grip help?
January 16, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Claus. Shut at the top or at impact? If at the top. You need to still have control over the club and the wrist will gradually set as you go up. It will need to be somewhat active for certain players. Try the Winter Backswing Video to get the wrist position better. Loosening the grip might make it worse. Causing the right wrist to hinge back on itself too much shutting the face.
January 16, 2016
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Claus
shut at top - at end of backswing I seem to actively bow the wrists and shut the face (probably to avoid ball going to the right which I struggled with in the past); as a result I would "steer" the club rather than letting it move naturally. Thought loosening the grip and maintain wrists more passively may help
January 17, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Claus. It all depends on why it is shut. Most players over hinge their right wrist and shut the face (grip too loose). If you are manually bowing the left wrist shutting it down at the top. Keep some grip pressure. Don't completely give up on it. But make sure you are setting the wrist properly as you are going up. You will need a little bit of control.
January 17, 2016
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Johan
My left wrist is as cupped at the top of my back swing as during setup, is it because I hold it too tight and don't let the club naturally straighten the wrist with its weight?
January 13, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Johan. Typically tension and not allowing for wrist/forearm rotation will keep the wrist cupped. The weight of the club can help a little. But, don't swing the club to move the proper body positions.
January 13, 2016
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Johan
So after the takeaway is complete should I deliberately work on rotating my wrist to a straight position in the backswing?
January 14, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Johan. After the takeaway when you start folding the trail arm the lead arm will start to rotate (Checkpoints Video). As the lead arm rotates you should allow for the wrist to start flattening out.
January 14, 2016
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Johan
Awesome, thank you!
January 14, 2016
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David
Just to clarify for me...at impact, should the left wrist have a full amount of ulnar deviation (unable to extend any further)?
January 13, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello David. You probably won't be maxed out to your flexibility range. But, you will be close.
January 13, 2016
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Yuefeng
Hello Craig, in my last review you mentioned I did not set my wrist during completion of my backswing. I guess what confuses me is what exactly I need to do to set the wrist, so appreciate if you could bear with me for the following questions: 1. What exactly does wrist set help achieve except for more power? 2. is the wrist setting part more left hand dominant or right hand dominant? 3. should I feel more of a cocking action in both hands? 4. how do I prevent the club being too steep? What I did was intentionally rotate my left forearm when I bend my right arm to flatten the club angle, and I think that's what caused the club end to point further away from the ball. Thank you very much in advance!
December 19, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Yuefeng. Wrist set in the backswing helps with some of the vertical motion in the backswing and staying on plane. The gradual loading of the wrist allows the club to stay a little more in front and provide feedback of club awareness. The wrist setting will feel more left side dominant. You will feel more of a cocking action in both hands. But, control it with the left and let the right react more. The left arm will rotate as a function of folding the right arm properly. You don't want to manually rotate the left too much. You can see well in the Checkpoints Video that as you fold the right it will create the proper amount of lead arm rotation.
December 19, 2015
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Craig
I think the video explains the process of the wrist well. My problem is that my wrists and forearms are very strong, yet my flexibility in the wrists is not good. Do you have any suggestions on how to correct the stiffness in the wrist so that you can generate the proper speed in the downswing. Are there exercises you can do to gain flexibility in the wrists. Once in a while when I can get them more supple the results are pretty awesome. I do not think I am gripping the club too tight but who knows probably a 5 most of the time unless I stand over the ball too long. Help?
November 8, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Craig. I don't have any specific flexibility exercises for you. I would look up some Baseball Pitcher's Stretches Online. However, I rarely run into a player lacking the flexibility to perform the our moves. You probably are death gripping more than you know. A typical tour pro starts at about 2 pressure wise, then ends up an 8 at impact. Try good pressure in the fingers, but the wrist soft and supple.
November 9, 2015
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Andrew
Can you elaborate the benefit of keeping the left wrist cupped at setup and graduately rotating the cupped left wrist to flat at top of the back swing? It seems you mentioned something about the club head too heavy if it flattens out too early at take away. I don't quite understand this part. I had never had a forward push at my takeaway since started playing and I always had a cupped left wrist at setup. But recently I developed a little move that triggers the takeaway that works very well for me, particularly with my irons. I push slightly forward and a bit downward by applying pressure on the part between my right thumb and right fore finger. This effectively bows my left wrist and flattens it out. At the same time I move my left knee a little bit out, as If I am presetting impact position. Then i start the usual takeway. I feel by doing so I ensure my wrist is flat at start and at top and I feel I hit the shots, particularly irons, more crispy. Would you endorse this move/routine?
November 6, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Andrew. It sounds like by presetting the impact you are allowing more momentum to swing the club. If you start with too flat or too much bow you will get in the way of rotation of the face and the club will tend to set more horizontal than vertical. You can see this in the One Simple Takeaway Fix Video. Overly, bowing the lead wrist to start and the club getting heavy/inside.
November 6, 2015
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Marc
You say you want the left wrist to be in control with the right wrist being passive, how does it contradict this with the idea of the right side pulling?
October 26, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Marc. You still want to pull the club back with the trail shoulder and trail oblique. Not try to push or hinge the lead/trail wrist to move the club back.
October 27, 2015
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Marc
OK thanks. By the way the tip with the tennis racquet is great, it really helped me to get a much better visualisation of the takeaway.
October 28, 2015
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Damien
Hello I have had a swing review today and started working through the videos. I have also been using the Zeppelin sensor to give me a better insight into my club plane. What I have noticed is that if when I come down on the downswing I consciously work on my right wrist cupping more, which also means my left hand bows more, I end up coming from the inside more. I also notice that my left arm does not break down after impact. I remember hearing something about this in one of the other videos but can't remember which one. Also is this the right approach? Is the cupping of the right wrist helping to stop my right hand from forcing the club to come over the top? Cheers Damien
September 29, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Damien. I think you are referring to the Downcock Pump Drill. I wouldn't practice thinking the cup of the right wrist is going to solve the over the top motion. I would work more on killing the trail side dominance and using the lead arm correctly. Proper Muscle Activation Video and the Over the Top Stick Drill Video.
September 29, 2015
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Jim
My problem is that after the clubshaft gets horizontal on the backswing, I flatten out the shaft for some reason so that the butt end of the club points beyond the ball-target line. I'm not sure if this is poor wrist action or there is some other culprit. Could over-rotation of the left forearm cause this or could I even be standing up and losing a small amount of spine angle? What would you recommend I do to diagnose and correct this error?
August 18, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jim. It could be over rotation of the lead arm and also lack of wrist set. Make sure that the lead arm only rotates as a function of folding the trail arm form the takeaway to the top. Also, make sure you are allowing for wrist set (Using the Wrist Effectively and Efficiently Video). When the lead arm is parallel to the ground the club should roughly be vertical with the wrist set.
August 19, 2015
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Jim
I thought when the lead arm is horizontal the club butt end should be pointing at the ball-target line or an extension of the line with the wrist set. Should it really be close to vertical?
August 19, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jim. Yes, it will be pointing roughly at the ball. I'm meaning the wrist set will be vertical. Gradually, setting from setup to the top. Looking from the Face On perspective. When the lead arm is parallel to the ground the club will look vertical.
August 19, 2015
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Howard
When I view my swing from the same down the line position he has in this video a little after the 9 min mark, my right wrist isn't bent back as much as his. Should I try to force my right wrist to bend back? Even when I do the static top of backswing position my right wrist isn't bent back much.
August 15, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Howard. You don't want the right wrist bowed or completely flat. It will have a touch of hinge and set. You can see that well in the Checkpoints Video in the Backswing Section. However, don't go to the extreme of feeling like you could hold a waiter's tray at the top.
August 17, 2015
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Brent
down cock and pump? 5 min to perfect release drills. Can't find em. And why does Dustin Johnson bow his wrists so much at the top of his swing? tkns
August 6, 2015
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Brent -- There is a search box just above the video list, to the right of the video player. You can type in any video title there and they will pop up. Here are the links to the requested videos though: http://www.rotaryswing.com/videos/full-swing-basics/downswing/5-minutes-to-the-perfect-golf-club-release https://rotaryswing.com/videos/full-swing-advanced/downswing/downcock-pump-drill
August 6, 2015
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Preston
Chris, the following post is a little lengthier than usual, but I would love for some advice on this topic. >>> Where should we feel the weight of the actual golf club in the takeaway, at the top of backswing, and impact? (Specifically certain areas of our hands) I noticed that my grip was starting out in the proper places, but on the takeaway and backswing it would change slightly where I felt pressure (and where the golf club itself was resting in my hands). I notice I feel pressure on right pointer finger and in the palm portion of my hand right below that same pointer (index) finger in the takeaway. Instead, should I feel the weight of the golf club at the end of the takeaway more in the middle finger and ring finger, specifically on the two creases the golf club rested and started on at address. I noticed when I tried doing the latter, in order to accomplish this, I had to rotate more to keep it in these two middles fingers than in my right index finger/portion of palm right under said finger. Also, I was wondering where do we feel the weight at the top of the backswing ( Because I feel most of the weight definitely in the portion of the palm that was stated above (right below right index finger) and the golf club is actually trying to work in-between that V on my right hand at the top of the swing. My right thumb tends to move left because if it stayed on top of the golf club, I feel like I have no leverage and no control. Lastly, at impact, I must be trying to time a flip or something, because I still feel the same portion of my palm (right under my right index finger pushing) on the side of the golf club at impact. Basically, I feel like the golf club does cannot stay in a constant position in my right hand. Help would be appreciated in these three specific areas! Again, sorry for the long post. Didn't know any way else to explain it :(
August 2, 2015
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Preston -- I love these sort of lengthy analytical posts, as it shows us instructors that we can find different ways to relay information and it also shows your desire to learn. Grip pressure is going to go through peaks and valley's during the entire golf swing and it will do this whether you like it or not. I am by no means trying to avoid any of your questions but I think it would be better to make sure that you grip is perfect at address as we outline on the site as well as the tension level being somewhere around 2-4 on a scale from 1-10. From there, your focus should be more on the wrists. Make sure that they remain supple and they are rotating and supporting properly without crazy amount of tension. The golf swing is happening so so fast and we are not ever hitting positions in the golf swing, we are moving through them. My point is, shift your focus away from the hands, do you best to maintain the grip pressure that you started with at address (it will change as I stated), and focus more on the wrists rotating and doing their job. I hope that helps you and again, please do not take that as shortchange, it is just a more clear way of getting to the end results. Also, check out the vijay release drill and fixing your release video so you can see where we want you focus in the most important area...the hitting area.
August 6, 2015
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Preston
Thank you Chris! I appreciate your reply. I am just one of those Padraig Harrington kinda guys that wants to know why or why not something works. (Tinker-er to a fault i suppose) But it's where a lot of confidence comes from in my golf swing. I appreciate you taking the time to reply and thoughtfully give your response. I think I understand. Basically the grip doesn't (or shouldn't) change from address and neither should the pressure, but, the pressure will change invariably because the club is moving throughout the swing. I'll take a look at the Vijay Release drill. It's my last year of college golf and am looking for a big year! Worked all summer on Rotary swing concepts and hoping for a payoff!
August 6, 2015
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Awesome Preston! Good luck with everything and know that the entire RST team is here to support you along the way. Let us know if you need anything and certainly keep us up to speed on how things go this upcoming season.
August 6, 2015
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Preston
Will do!!
August 6, 2015
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Jason
kh
July 19, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jason. Do you have a question?
July 19, 2015
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Jason
typo error I think. I'm sure I'll think of one in the future. thx.
July 19, 2015
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George
Chris says that the left wrist rotates in the takeaway and backswing, and that the right wrist reacts to this rotation. But the RST tenet of the takeaway/backswing is that the right side pulls the club back, and that pushing with the left is wrong. How does one rotate the left wrist without pushing with the left side?
July 16, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Patterson. The left wrist will rotate in the takeaway. The problem is the vast majority of people over rotate. You still want to pull back with the trail shoulder blade and oblique to move the arms to move the club. Chris is merely trying to emphasize don't get in the way of the forearm rotation that needs to take place in order to get the club toe up.
July 16, 2015
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George
Makes sense. I guess my problem with cupping the left wrist is more at the top of the backswing rather than the takeaway, so trying to rotate that left wrist causes me to get too deep instead of getting to a square position at the top
July 17, 2015
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JOE
one of the best! one of the hardest things for me is to move the lower body first , what has helped is the hands and wrists being relaxed,( I got to tell this story) i pulled a mussel in my right arm bicep. I walk 9 holes every morning . I just decided to go anyway and let the right arm just do as little as possible . I felt like i was in slow motion. I had one of the best rounds and hit the ball farther and in play . When i start missing the fairways and short its got to be my right arm, right wrist and right shoulder taking over . thanks for the video its one of my favorites . Joe T.
July 10, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Joe. Thanks for the post. Sorry to hear about the bicep. But, it seems you are starting to learn how to use the lead side better coming down. For more help on using the lower body first. Take a look at the RST Tempo Drill and Swinging from the Ground Up in the Introduction Advanced Section.
July 10, 2015
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Ken
This is the third time I've watched this video. There's so much great information in it. This time I took note of the very last line of instruction, in regards to the trail arm, that the speed doesn't come from the hand itself; rather, it comes from the angle in the wrist and arm, as better said and illustrated by Chris in the video. This information is revealing and liberating. With this knowledge, one should be able to extinguish the thought of "push" with the trail hand. Thanks Chris.
July 6, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ken. Really pleased to hear about the "learning" and enjoyment from the video. Appreciate the post.
July 6, 2015
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Tushar
My first post so here goes. I have worked hard at the take away and my shoulder turn. My arm elevation is good and my left wrist is getting into the right position. The problem I seem to have is the correct feel for the right wrist. It naturally wants to cup because of the weight of the club. But how much cupping should occur. I am mindful of not holding too much tension in my arms in the back swing but if I don't maintain some right wrist cock, the club would just 'flop'. Also I don't understand or have a feel for the right arm rotation at the top of the back swing to set the club on plane as Chuck has described. New member and enjoying the site immensely. Lots to work on and already some improvements.
June 3, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Tushar. The trail wrist should remain passive. Take a look at the Right Wrist Video in the Advanced Takeaway Section. Take a look at the 3 Functions of the Right Arm in the Advanced Backswing Section for more help with creating the plane. Glad to hear already some improvements!
June 3, 2015
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Stephen
Hi Craig, on 8 mins on this video, Chris states about turning his left wrist so that his watch is pointing up to the sky. When i do this my club is laid off more than usual. On my last review i was cupped at the top of my swing and you wanted me too look at my left hand grip. Do i need to focus on getting my left wrist pointing to the sky aswell? thanks stephen
May 16, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Stephen. Your lead arm was rotating correctly. More an issue with grip and cupping than internal rotation.
May 16, 2015
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Dean
I would like to know active or inactive the wrists are during the golf swing. I currently play to a 10 and have always felt that there is restriction preventing a full and speedy release. You give drills on this but they seem counter intuitive to a fluid wrist movement. Since the majority of speed is transferred here the actual amount of force an individual will use is a bit confusing. could someone clear this up for me?
May 6, 2015
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james (Certified RST Instructor)
Hi Dean, The wrists and forearms help to generate the speed and power in the swing whilst also controlling the club face with the left hand release through impact. If your not feeling a speedy release check out the release videos as well as the using the thumbnail for power video which can help with the forearm rotation needed in the swing to ramp up that distance Enjoy!
May 9, 2015
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sajid
Wrist Set- Hinging of right wrist ( like hammer)
May 3, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Sajid. Yes.
May 4, 2015
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Loran
I take it golf is very angular and all wrists-y. So, there are three wrist sets on the way to the top, correct? The takeaway, the ninety degrees at the top, and finally the elusive slot at the top, right?
May 2, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Loan. Don't make it too complicated. The wrist set is very gradual. There is no "quick set" or max set that you want to hit on the way up. As you rotate, the lead wrist will gradual add set to the top. The trail wrist will be nice and relaxed with a little hinge and set. Like flipping a coin over your shoulder.
May 4, 2015
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Carole
Fabulous video. I have been trying for 3 months to figure out why I couldn't execute the takeaway correctly. Every time I took a practice swing it was perfect, but whenever I actually tried to hit the ball, I'd bow my left wrist so even though my hands were on plane, the club shaft was inside the line. It was driving me crazy. My swing instructor James had told me to rotate my hands, but I still couldn't figure it out, until I saw your use of the tennis racket. Then I realized that I had a very slight cocking of my wrists at the very start of the takeaway that we couldn't really see, that I wasn't really aware of, and that set me up for a bowing at the end of the takeaway. Problem solved. The tennis racket was a wonderful visual and it's now my favorite training aid. I can't swing a club in my house, but I can certainly swing a tennis racket. The larger grip of the racket was just what I needed to train me to not manipulate my left wrist and it also helped me to start to rotate counter-clockwise down instead of dropping below the line of the downswing. Thank you to Chris. This video, start to finish, is excellent.
April 26, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Carole. Fantastic. I'm glad that you found the video so helpful. And, Chris is much appreciative of the kind words on his video. Keep the swing work moving forward!
April 27, 2015
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GARY
Thank you for this really well explained video. I am told that I keep flipping me wrists at contact causing me to hit the ground first or the heel of the club. How do I stop doing this? Many thanks.
April 20, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gary. Take a look at the Frisbee Drill in the Weight Transfer Section. And, the Taking a Divot Video in the Advanced Downswing Section. They will help with the flip and turf first contact.
April 20, 2015
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Jackie (Certified RST Instructor)
This comment is for my swing review instructor Craig Morrow. In my review you recommended this video to understand how the wrists work throughout the swing. This video definitely gives me a better understanding of how the wrists work. However, as you stated, my problem is that my wrists set late in the swing causing me to elevate too much at the top. Did you want me to just continue with the 5 min to the perfect takeaway video? I am not clear on what the next step I should take is. Obviously I need more wrist set in the takeaway to stop the late wrist set. So should I just keep working on that? Thank you
April 19, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jackie. I'm glad you have a better understanding now of what the wrist in the swing. Continue with the Takeaway and getting the proper wrist set. I want you to start learning how the lead arm will work to the top and you will continue to add more gradual wrist set. With the knowledge you have now it will help us get to the top much easier once you own the new takeaway move.
April 19, 2015
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Matt
Should there be ulnar flexion in the wrists, especially the lead wrist, through impact to create more of a straight line with the forearm and club from a down the line view?
January 27, 2015
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Patrick (Certified RST Instructor)
Yes, ulnar deviation or "uncocking" of both wrists will take place coming into impact. You will want to see a straight line with the club shaft and the RIGHT forearm at impact.
January 28, 2015
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Terry
Where's the Downcock and Pump Drill on the website? Just a comment - it would be nice to have a search capability to find these drill references that come up during these videos.
January 21, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Terry. The Downcock Pump Drill is located in the Advanced Downswing Section. There is a search function just below the listed videos section in every category.
January 23, 2015
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Sunil
How do we start the backswing ? Right. Shoulder rotation or left arm rotation ? It seems confusing
January 10, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Sunil. Take a look at the 5 Minutes to Master Rotation in the Takeaway Section. Initial movement of the club needs to start due to rotation. Pulling the trail shoulder blade down and in. As a trigger you can consider starting the load into the trail glute early.
January 10, 2015
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David
ive noticed in chucks videos in the swing analysis section his right wrist is very cupped in the backswing and downswing much more then what is taught in this video or any others? is there a reason no one talks about this? is it a secret move?
January 9, 2015
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
David, It's a natural reaction to the external rotation of the humerous and the flattening of the left wrist at the top of the backswing. When your hands are connected, as they are in the grip, it is impossible to flatten one wrist without cupping the other when the wrists are in the cocked up position. However, when the wrists are uncocked, both wrists can be flat. So, it had been indirectly mentioned via other movements that are being taught that cause the trail wrist cupping. Great eye though! And a great question! Let us know if you need anything else R.J.
January 10, 2015
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David
ok so are you saying at no point in the swing he deliberately cups the right wrist and he gets that much cupping from just focussing on flattening the left wrist? thanks.
January 10, 2015
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
In conjunction to what RJ says below, the right wrist functions at the top of the swing do to the passiveness that it is in it as the hands and arms work into the vertical plane. Think of the right hand as a support brace to the lead arm at the top of the swing and if it is kept passive enough, it would almost feel like a tray...thus giving you the cupped/hinged (dorsiflexion) appearance.
January 11, 2015
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
David, Yes, that's correct. It's a direct result of both flattening the left wrist and cocking the wrists to set the club on plane. In those conditions (left wrist flat, both wrists cocked), the result would be a cupped right wrist 100% of the time. Chuck's right wrist cups a little more because he has more flexible arms and his humerus is externally rotated more. However, it is not necessary to go that far in order to produce a great and powerful golf swing. R.J.
January 11, 2015
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Jeffrey
I'm a bit confused. In this video Chris says the lead (left) wrist is in control. The right wrist reacts to the left. In a video titled "Pushing with the left side" Chuck says the right arm is in control and the left does nothing. Also we are told the left arm should lead in the down swing with little use of the right hand. (Vijay drill). If however the right hand/arm is in control going back we must then switch control to the left coming down. It seems easier to just have the left in control through out the swing. I was taught for many years that the left hand/arm was in control and the right stayed passive through out the swing.Which is correct?
January 7, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jeff. You want to pull back with the trail side muscles (right side for right handed). And, pull down with the lead side (left side for left handed). You use the right to go right and left to go left. The left arm will have a job to do in the backswing. Nevertheless, you don't want the origin of motion and swing plane being dominated by just controlling the left arm.
January 8, 2015
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pat
At the top of my backswing my left wrist is cupped instead of flat. Is this a bad thing? Will this cupping effect club head speed? ( I have no problems getting the club head square at impact. )
December 11, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Pat. Preferably, the lead wrist needs to be flat at the top of the swing. The cupped lead wrist requires too much manipulation to get the face square at impact. The cupping will inhibit the efficiency of speed delivered in the release.
December 12, 2014
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Mads
Hi Chris I'm a bit in doubt on how to get the right wrist set at the top of my backswing. Right now when I reach the end of my backswing, the angle between the shaft and my right arm is less than 90 degrees (ussually around 70). This results in me getting past parallel at the top. Would it be okay to feel that your wrists feel rather "stiff" in the backswing, like you're trying to keep them from hinging at all (which will happen, of cource)? When I look at my swing on video doing that, my backswing looks near perfect (according to Aaron), but it just feels awkward and non-flexble.
December 8, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Mads -- A couple of things here to help you out... 1. Make sure at address that the grip pressure and wrists are between a 2-4 on a scale from 1-10 (1 being relaxed and 10 being rigid). At the completion of the takeaway, make sure the the pressure has not complete and the club shaft is parallel to the ground. 2. Head to the self analysis tab at the top of the page and load a version of Chucks swing from down the line. There is a white shirt and greenish shorts view with and 8 iron that will show you what we are looking for the wrists to do as we move past the takeaway. You want to try and keep them relaxed enough but supportive enough at the top so that you are not fully loading them on your own, which could result in early throwing of the club and you want to make sure that you are not squeezing and tensing to where you can create any sort of downcock in the club when you shift left. Try those tips out and let me know if they help or you need further information and I will gladly assist you all that I can. All the best - Chris
December 8, 2014
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Barry
I've been swinging stiff wristed for over 20 years with a late set that causes an across the line at the top. I'm supposed to add more wrist set in my backswing, which is currently a conscious effort. Even a little wrist set in my takeaway to support the club is still a conscious effort. If I try to keep my wrists passive I get very little wrist set until the top. I could use more advice than to just keep wrists nice and relaxed only to support the club with a light grip pressure of 4-5 out of 10. Like ways to shake out wrist tension and reps with the 9-3 drill w/ wrist set 100 times a day for a month... Thanks.
October 19, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Barry, I would check out the following videos: The Golf Grip - How To: Full Swing Program Setup (There could be a grip issue that is causing the problems with the stiff wrists) RST Tempo Drill: Full Swing Program Introduction (This and the following video may help you feel more natural and relaxed) Re-Shaping Swing For Lag: Full Swing Program Introduction If none of that works, get a donut weight and put it on your club that you're using, then do exaggerated lag drills so that you can really feel the weight and your wrists loosen up a bit. R.J.
October 20, 2014
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Vince
I'm totally lost at this point with all the moving parts and you guys bouncing around in terminology and even more jargon-laden videos sprinked throughout the site. My left wrist is 'so' cupped just after impact that it's past sore and all the way to injured. I'm definitely not understanding what the left wrist is supposed to be doing (or not) and when, nor what the right wrist and elbow are supposed to be doing to add the speed. When I add speed I'm just jamming my left wrist more and more (similar pointing my arm straight out palm down and pulling the hand up to perpendicular with the ground the wrong way). Result is I protect the injury and get even more right-side dominant and hurt it more and things escalate. Do you have a 'simple' and focused video of the arms bicep-down all the way through the swing and release ? I can't see what's rotating or not in your videos, there's not enough contrast to really see what you're cupping or rotating or bowing or whatever..... This isn't rocket science. I'm a former baseball/tennis player so I know the concepts of what the swings should feel like and definitely know that if it hurts, there's something basic wrong. This stuff is just too much jargon and data for what to me should be just a few swing keys. Help !
October 8, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey VInce -- Based on your last few comments posted in the video section it sounds like you are getting more and more overwhelmed with what is going on the with the wrist/hands and the arms in the golf swing. Our goal from the start has always been to provide as much detailed information along with facts based information. A good portion of our membership desires to hear things broken down in the most technical of ways so that they can have a clear understanding on how the body works in all parts of the golf swing. We are certainly not trying to make it "rocket science", we are just providing information that stays in line with how and why Rotary Swing was developed. If you are getting hurt/injured while trying to perform some sort of move that we are instructing, then something is definitely wrong. I understand that you are a former athlete and so you well know that it is important to have a lot of technical information about how the body functions to perform things safely and efficiently. Let me explain further what the lead wrist should be doing in the golf swing... -The lead wrist at address starts in a slightly cupped position based on the grip taken from correct anatomic golf posture. -From there, the lead wrist starts to rotate into the takeaway while losing a bit of the cupped look. -The lead wrist adds just a bit of wrist set or "cocking" at the completion of the takeaway to help support the club -From there the lead wrist continues to rotate into the completed part of the backswing where is should be flat at the top of the swing -In transition when the arms start the down, the lead wrist begins to rotate in the opposite way that it did during the backswing and as the hands are approaching the trail thigh, you should have rotated it enough to where your glove logo is faced in front of you. -From there, the release happens where the left wrist is rotating through the hitting area into impact and then continues to rotate post impact to where your glove logo would now be faced behind you at about hip high. From what you are explaining, it is very clear that your trail side wrist/hand, is pushing WAY to hard in the hitting area causing the lead wrist to break down, which is causing you to flip the club. If the lead wrist is relaxed and flat at impact, then you should be in good shape for a solid strike. If you see that the clubhead is passing the lead wrist prior to impact, then you can be certain that the trail wrist caused this to happen. This is very common and we see it all the time from our students. Take your lead wrist only on the golf club and swing out to 9:00 to where you glove logo is faced in front of you, then allow the lead arm to swing down underneath the shoulder, like the shoulder is a pivot point and rotate the wrist to where your wrist remains flat all the way to the 3:00 position where your glove logo will be behind you. At the completion of the rep, check to make sure the lead wrist is good and flat and the glove logo is faced behind you. Also, check to make sure there was no pain during this process. The lead wrist should feel EXTREMELY relaxed and the focus while the arm is falling should only be on the rotation of the wrist. Check it on camera and see that you will have a good flat lead wrist position at impact and you wont see any major cupping of the lead wrist. If there is no pain and you are seeing as I am describing, then repeat this process a bunch. Then slowly add the trail hand back to the mix and repeat and check for all the same things I listed above. The stuff I mention above is outlined pretty clearly in 5 minutes to a perfect release. The most important part for you at this point is to make sure that the lead wrist is relaxed and rotating through the hitting area. If you feel tension, then you are doing it wrong. If you see flipping, then your trail side is pushing against the club too hard and causing breakdown. If this does not offer a solution to you and your pain, then let me know and I will have you email me your swing so that I can take a look and give you some clarification is to what is going on and why you are stuck. I would suggest that you check out 5 minutes to a perfect release, LADD video, squaring the face early which are both in the program downswing section and then check out the Right arm only downswing drill after you make sure your release is good. Good luck and keep me posted.
October 8, 2014
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Vince
Thanks Chris - I'll work without a club and let stuff heal for a bit before starting back up with the club flipped and see how it goes. Stay tuned. Years ago I used to battle tennis elbow so I know the drill. Ice is pull-tabs-on-beer wonderful One piece of feedback I thought I'd mention is that I'd suggest 'all' of your videos need to include a couple swings focussing on what 'good' is supposed to look like. Most of the videos have what to me are very over-exaggerated partial demos of what's incorrect. It would be helpful to have a nice demo of what 'correct' looks like early in the video, maybe in the middle, and definitely to reinforce it at the end. Just a thought. Thanks for your detailed reply, and thank Amy for her nice customer service. Much appreciated.
October 8, 2014
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Gregory
Hi: Been looking at my swing videos and the videos on here. I get the take away( bucket drill) and the left arm rotation. I am just not getting the wrist cock. As a result my swing is way to flat. When and how do you cock the wrists? Thanks! Greg
October 5, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gregory. Take a look at the 5 Mins to Perfect Takeaway roughly 22 mins into it. Chuck will discuss. Its just a slight set of the wrist.
October 5, 2014
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Joe
Hi , there's a drill that's talked about calling downward cock or something like that to help with wrist set on the backswing, can you tell me where this drill video is? Thanks Joe
October 4, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Joe. We have the Downcock Pump Drill in the Advanced Downswing Section.
October 5, 2014
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Calvin
Should there be an emphasis on rotating the hands (right over the left) after impact, or should the hands naturally rotate? If I rotate my hands that way, it results in a straight pull or worse.
September 23, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Calvin. (Right Handed Player) You don't need to force the right over left. If you properly release the left hand, the right will naturally follow. You don't want too much tension or control taking over with the right.
September 23, 2014
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Gregory
Chris: I am working hard on the downswing. My fault is to start the downswng with my upper body and thus open my shoulders at impact. The result is either a dead pull left or a block. I know you say to watch the videos, and intellectually I get the information. Yet I still can master it. Is their an over exaggeration drill I can do to quiet the upper body and start the downswing with the lower part? Thanks so much.
September 16, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gregory. You can use the Re-Shaping Your Swing for Lag, 5 Minutes to the Perfect Downswing, LADD, Stop Coming Over the Top, and the Over the Top Stick Drill Video to help with weight shift and shoulder spinning. Also, the RST Tempo Drill, How the Lower Body Works "stomp drill", Weight Shift Part 3, and the Sitting Into the Left Side Video to help the lower body initiate the swing from the ground up. If you practice very slowly and at pace. Learn how to transfer the weight first before you start to rotate the body too hard. Then train the lead arm correctly as you will not require the trail side to push through and aid the arms back in front.
September 16, 2014
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George
Would a cupping of the left wrist in the takeaway/backswing start a chain reaction that leads to a cupped wrist at impact? I have noticed in my swing that I cup my left wrist at the start of the swing instead of rotating clockwise. My general result is an open clubface at the top of the swing, and I think I have trained myself to become very right arm/hand dominant during the backswing just in order to have a clubface that is not wide open, although I add loft. From my position at the top, if I simply rotated my left arm counter-clockwise in the downswing, I would end up with a wide open face.
September 12, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Patterson. There is a natural amount of cupping in the wrist at setup. You want to gradual lose that as you take the club back. You want to make sure that the left arm is rotating properly going back. Check the right wrist and make sure the proper amount of set and hinge allows the clubface to be squared up. Yes, your face would be open coming down from your current position unless you really rotated the wrist and turned the knuckles down.
September 12, 2014
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Robert
Is it okay to hinge the wrist after contact? Or should we be focused on a neutral position and wrist rotation?
September 10, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Robert. The lead wrist won't hinge until very late in the follow through.
September 10, 2014
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Robbie
Hi Chris, in this video you talk about the left wrist flattening out from the takeaway to the top. Does that mean it's in a totally neutral position (no hinge or cock) but is still rotating?
September 5, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Robbie. The left wrist flattens out because of the rotation in the left arm and the hinge/set in the right wrist. There isn't a max set with the left, but some gradual set. There shouldn't be any apparent hinge.
September 5, 2014
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Daniel
Sorry, I meant to say my spine angle lowers at the initation of the backswing.
September 4, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
If you try the Golf Body Rotation Video in the Advanced Backswing Section. You will notice the spine angle and head will remain the same. If you rotate properly around center.
September 4, 2014
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Daniel
Chris, one of my swing flaws is that my spine angle lowers at the initiation of the downswing. I've been told in my swing analysis that this is due to my left arm dominating the initial backswing (pushing instead of pulling). Yet the video seems to indicate that the left arm should be doing all of the work in the takeaway. What do you recommend as a swing thought for someone who is using too much left arm and wrist in the takeaway?
September 4, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dan. Chris is referring to the left arm needs to be our driver overall, but going back the right side has to be pulling. The swing key is making sure you rotate and don't arm swing off the ball. Use the 5 Mins to Master Rotation in the Takeaway Section to make sure the first movement is rotation, not left arm push. Also, the Role of the Right Arm in the Advanced Takeaway Section, use the 2 inch hand drill (maintain the gap and finger tip length) to pull versus push.
September 4, 2014
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william
i spin or jump from upper body not as bad aas before first ime hiting balls today since i joined some good shots ball flite has changed still my concern is over ative uuper body take away seemed good and inproved ny ideas thanks bill c
August 30, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Bill. You are concerned with over active upper body back or thru? Upper body back is essential to store energy and engage the big muscles to move the club. On the way down the upper will be very passive to release the energy at the strike versus too soon from the top. Take a look at the Stop Coming Over the Top and the 5 Minutes to a Perfect Downswing in the Downswing Section to practice feeling the shoulders staying passive and allowing the arms to work in front.
September 1, 2014
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Gregory
Chris. Great explanation. My error on the back swing is to roll my club face open and get the club stuck behind me. What generally causes that? So I guess I have been overcompensating and trying to avoid the left arm rotation. Any suggestions? Thanks so much!
August 28, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gregory. If you've been adding too much manual rotation too soon take a look at the One Simple Takeaway Fix in the Advanced Takeaway Section. Work on quieting down the hands and arms too early.
August 28, 2014
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prempree
Very easy to understand thanks
August 28, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Prempree. Thanks!
August 28, 2014
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Michael
Exceptional video.
August 27, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Michael. We appreciate it!
August 27, 2014
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william
is a pull of the left arm or a drop or a responce from lower body
August 26, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Bill. The downswing will start from the ground up. Lower body initiates. Gravity and pull from the left lat/oblique will aid in bringing the lead arm on plane and back in front of the chest.
August 26, 2014
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Emily
Why can't I access this video
August 25, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Emily. The video seems to be working on our end. It might be your browser. Are you using Chrome or Firefox? If you are and it still won't play. Use the Contact Us Link at the bottom of this page. Let Customer Support know your issue. Very friendly and happy to help.
August 25, 2014
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joseph
when the right hand has dropped into the slot at waist high is the right palm direction at 1 o clock 2 o clock or slightly rolled over towards 12 o clock?
August 18, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Joseph. I'm a little confused by the question. The right palm will be facing away from the body. With the motion rotating it towards the ball.
August 18, 2014
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joseph
if there was a clock to the right side of me i rotate and lift the club so the club head would be in the area of 2 o clock when i drop my hands to waist high is the club head in the same area?
August 19, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Yes, it would be in the same area so to speak. The club should be on the plane line in down in the hitting area just as it should be moving into the takeaway.
August 19, 2014
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Jesse
Chris, I have noticed that for years I tend to cup my lead wrist in my backswing, which I believe is because I am trying to get more wrist cock at the top of my swing. This has become a natural tendency unless I consciously try to make my wrist flat at the top. You mentioned that the weight of the club should naturally cause the wrist to flatten at the top, so I'm wondering if my swing plane is too upright. Let me know what you think. Thanks.
August 17, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jesse. The cupping is usually a grip or lack of rotation issue. Make sure the grip isn't too strong. Golf Grip How to Video Setup Section. Also, the 5 Mins to a Perfect Backswing Video in the Backswing Section. You have to allow the lead forearm to rotate. Flat lead wrist and slight set/hinge in trail wrist.
August 17, 2014
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Jesse
Thanks, Craig, I'll give it a try.
September 1, 2014
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Steven
Great video - I would like to see more on the initial dropping of the club at the top to flatten out the swing and then the release - I have heard the phrase the back hand (forearm) should drill into the ground to add speed- your thoughts? thanks
August 16, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Steven. Take a look at the LADD Video in the Downswing Section to understand shallowing out the swing plane and squaring up the club. Also, the 5 Minutes to a Perfect Release will teach how to get the flat left wrist at impact every time.
August 17, 2014
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Scott
I like this video, but I have a question: so on the downswing, when the wrists/club moves from the top to the "hitting area" (as Chris calls it), there should be little rotation of the left arm? In the vid Chris says, "the hands and wrists aren't doing much of anything" (see from 9:20 onward). If this is the case, then the rotation of the arms/hands/wrists happens during the release BUT NOT EARLIER???
August 13, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Scott. There is little rotation from the top compared to the release. The massive acceleration into impact. The lead arm will be rotating slightly. Take a look at the LADD Video in the Downswing Section to understand what the left arm is doing.
August 13, 2014
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work4golf
Love this great vital key video analysis, it has improved both of my speed and distance. Awesome work. Thanks.
August 12, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Thanks! Appreciate the good word!
August 12, 2014
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Joseph
Hi i am not getting enough lag and finding difficult to maintain
August 11, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Joseph. We have 100's of videos that pertain to lag. It would be hard to diagnose without some more information. There are many culprits to losing lag early in the downswing. My suggestion would be to upload a swing to our online review team. Tell your instructor what your goals are. He will come up with a game plan for you.
August 11, 2014
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work4golf
Love this great video, it has imroved both of my speed and distance. Awesome, awesome Chris!!
August 5, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Glad you liked it! Appreciate the good feedback!
August 6, 2014
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work4golf
Great viital info. video!!. It has shaved at least 10 strokes off my game!.
August 5, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
10 Strokes! Excellent job!
August 6, 2014
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John
At the top of the backswing does the palm of the right hand face right, away from the target, or forward toward the target line? Thanks John Jewell
August 3, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey John. I think I understand what you are asking for. The right hand will be facing slightly away from the target from the DTL perspective.
August 3, 2014
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John
At the top of the swing, does the palm of the right hand face right, away from the target or forward (toward the target line)? Thanks John Jewell
August 3, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey John. I think I understand what you are asking for. The right hand will be facing slightly away from the target from the DTL perspective.
August 3, 2014
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Michael
Is there a video to explain how to get power out of the ground. Your video was terrific. I hit it flush after unferdtanding the role of the left wrist.
August 3, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Michael. The Tiger Squat Video and Straight Left Leg at Impact Video in the Advanced Downswing Section will discuss leveraging the ground.
August 3, 2014
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William J
Would it be correct to say that the wrists at address are fully uncocked (ulnar deviation)?
August 2, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jeff. At address there is a slight hinge/set in the wrist. Fully uncocked ulnar deviation will not happen until impact and the release.
August 2, 2014
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ken
Great video Chris!
August 2, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Thank you very much Ken
August 2, 2014
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Ricardo
Fast and to the point. great advice, if you can give us some reference about WHEN is the CRAZY passenger releasing the energy will be perfect.
August 2, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Thanks for the kind words Rick. Check out 5 minutes to a perfect release in the downswing section and then you will get a good idea of when the crazy guy can get involved.
August 2, 2014
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Douglas
Good job Tyler. I have all ways wondered if all this wrist rotation was a conscious thing or a body thing. Finally, an RST answer. I am only using you guys for instruction now. All the pro teachers around here can't seem to explain things like you guys do. Great job RST.
August 2, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Thanks Douglas. Very glad to have you on the site and we are here to help you out as much as possible.
August 2, 2014
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Ken
This is the best instruction I've ever heard from Chris. Very well spoken, easy to follow, and chock full of technical instruction (I meant that as a compliment). It comes at a good time too, as I'm focusing more on what the lead hand/wrist is supposed to be doing. Many thanks for the excellent teaching.
August 2, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Ken thanks for the kind words! I am glad this helped shed some light for you. Keep working at it.
August 2, 2014
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thomas
Great video - one thing though - in this video you are talking about the left arm as the driver/dominant arm in the backswing. But in this article you say the opposite: http://www.rotaryswing.com/golf-instruction/golfbiomechanics/left-arm-in-the-golf-swing Is there something I am not understanding here? Thanks Thomas
August 1, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Both arms play a role in the golf swing. The right side will be the pulling side. You are correct about that. But, the left does have a job to do. There will be some rotation and set, but just don't let him be the only star of the show.
August 2, 2014
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Greg
First to level set terms: dorsiflexion = cupping of wrist, palmar-flexion=bowing of wrist, ulnar-deviation=un-cocking, radial-deviation=cocking, supination = palm up, pronation = palm down. Given the terms are correct: What does the left wrist do at setup (some dorsiflexion/cupping + some ulnar-deviation), towards the top (slight palmar-flexion + radial-deviation), and at impact (palmar-flexion + ulnar-deviation)? For instance @5:22 it appears your left wrist has some: dorsiflexion happening what about deviation? In your terms describe transition from your setup position to the top to impact. Thanks!
August 1, 2014
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Steven (Certified RST Instructor)
Greg, You hit the nail on the head. at address there is going to be some dorsilflexion or cupping of the left wrist due to the slightly stronger than neutral grip. about when the club get // to the ground there is still some cupping of the left wrist with some radial deviation and at the top of the swing slight palmar flexion and radial deviation.......Sounds like you got it Greg.
August 2, 2014
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gerard
great video Chris...may be the best one of the whole series as far as I'm concerned. You could use my last submission to show how it shouldn't be done!!!
August 1, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Gerard, thanks very much for the kind words. Very glad to hear that you enjoyed it and you are not alone in the world of incorrect usage. We will get you all fixed up
August 2, 2014
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gerard
Best video yet.....that was unbelievably helpful and creates a much clearer picture of what needs to happen...nice job Chris
August 1, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Thanks very much!!! Glad you enjoyed it. We always want to pass along the best instruction possible to help each and every student. That is our goal!!!
August 2, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gerard. I will pass along the good word. Glad you enjoyed it!
August 1, 2014
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rick
Again, easy to understand. Never had a breakdown explanation of how the wrists actually work during the swing like this! Good job.
August 1, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Thank you Rick!
August 1, 2014
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John
During the swing I don't generally think about one hand or the other. I try to feel that both wrists are supinating/pronating together while maintaining light grip pressure. Chris make it seem like your left wrist is the "driver", more active side. If anything, because I pull with my right shoulder blade, I feel that my right side is a bit more active. I feel like I'm hitting the ball very well but I'm wondering if activating my left side would give me a little more club head speed?
August 1, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello John. Both hands and arms play a roll in the swing. You still want to maintain good connection with both. It is ok to feel that the right side is active going back. I concentrate on pulling the right shoulder blade and keeping the right arm straight. As I allow for gradual wrist set with both of the wrist.
August 1, 2014
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Muhammad
Please can you advice me one thing that When I sent my video for swing analysis they have told me in tàke away not to do any wrist movement at all but you are telling to do wrist moment . Please kindly advice what to do ???? ?????!
August 1, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Muhammad. In the takeaway the arms and hands are very passive. Typically people over do the amount of wrist set and roll. We don't want to consciously activate them too soon. Take a look at the 5 Mins to the Perfect Takeaway Video in the Takeaway Section about 22-23 mins in. Chuck will discuss. Also, the Unleash Your Thumbnail for Power Video in the Advanced Takeaway Section. If no rotation occurred at all. The club would match too much of the spine angle.
August 1, 2014
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Thomas
Great Video. You guys are really moving up, no more W. Orange CC, although I still have the visual swinging my club out to that old pond and not to the inside, LOL
August 1, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
We are like the Jeffersons. Movin' on up! Thanks for the good feedback. You have the pond visual. I have the low over hanging branches from the tree on the right.
August 1, 2014
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Paul
Great explanation of what the wrist do in the take away and downswing.
August 1, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Thanks Paul. Glad you enjoyed the instruction!
August 1, 2014
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Michael
Great shorts!
August 1, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
high fashion
August 1, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Chris is fashion!
August 1, 2014
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jeffrey
very comprehensive and clear instruction.
August 1, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Appreciate the good feedback!
August 1, 2014
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jeffrey
hot pink shorts?
August 1, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Very fashionable here at RST!
August 1, 2014
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Ted
What is your feeling when you set the wrists at the end of the takeaway. Do you feel a push down at the butt of the club by the left hand? Please advise. Thanks, Ted
July 31, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Not so much push down, but more like gradually pulling back the hammer on a pistol.
August 1, 2014
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Lynn
Great video !! Very well done !
July 31, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
On the phone with Christopher. Will tell him the good news Lynn! Thanks!
July 31, 2014

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