My Golf Backswing Secrets

My keys to success for a perfect golf backswing - how to make the backswing simple and repeatable. If you struggle with either your takeaway or the backswing, then this video is for you. It contains my two most important fundamentals for making a tour pro quality backswing in an easy to understand "mantra". If you focus just on making these two moves, the backswing will be easier than you ever imagined. However, if you start adding your extra movements and don't take the time to break these bad habits, you'll make it impossible for you to make a sound downswing.

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Gary C
I’ve suddenly realized that if I shorten my backswing a bit I have a much easier time creating the proper body sequence on the downswing. It also feels like I am getting an incredible amount of leverage pushing off the ground even when trying to swing as easy as I can. This makes me think that I’ve been trying to max out my rotation in my backswing to a point that it is creating tension and then causing my upper body to fire early. I imagine shortening the backswing slightly increases my ability to sequence the swing properly and therefore hit the ball more accurately and consistently at the expense of some distance though the amount of power I feel through impact when I get the sequence right makes me think I may not be losing as much distance as I’d expect. My backswing hasn’t felt comfortable until today as I suddenly realized this and practice with a shorter and more comfortable backswing. The shorter backswing feels easier and more relaxed and it suddenly feels easier to get my hips rotating first in the downswing. Would all this be a correct or acceptable observation and approach? I’d be more than happy to hit the ball consistently straight even if I was a few yards shorter overall.
April 28, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gary. Yes. This would be a correct observation. Remember, elevation is a variable. If you don't have such high hands and a little tighter motion. it certainly won't hurt you in the long run. Hence, why we also teach a simplified position once you have the components down. Take a look at Simplify Your Backswing with Shallow Arms Video.
April 28, 2021
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Gary C
For a while now, I have been sort of thinking of the backswing as being almost as much initiated by my trail hip moving back as the shoulder turn initiating things because for a while I had a tendency to restrict my trail hip rotation and that was a focal point that helped me make sure I didn’t restrict it. Now I find that thought still seems to serve me well in thinking of my trail hip rotating back and sort of throwing my arms up into position. This helps me keep my focus on the lower body in an attempt to keep my upper body and arms more relaxed and passive. With a shorter backswing thought combined with the focus on the trail hip to start the takeaway and backswing it all seems to work for me and gets me loaded up but relaxed. My question, is if this thought or focus is okay or if there is danger in it. I am very careful amd have ingrained well that my weight doesn’t move outside NJA during the backswing amd weight moves to right ankle/heel so I am not over rotating my hips during the backswing. If I am not potentially creating that problem is there any issue with me thinking about or execute the swing with that type of backswing focus (hips rotate and lead the upper body into position with a shorter backswing, not maxed out, and shallow relaxed arms). It definitely seems to be a focus that is working for me right now. Just don’t want to develop a bad habit if there are potential negatives to it.
April 28, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gary. Zero issue with using weight/hips to help start the swing and using some momentum to help the arms reach the top. A very fluid and low tense way to generate the swing movement off the ball.
April 29, 2021
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Eric
I have been a Rotary Swing member for years. While it has helped me tremendously, I two areas that cause me some confusion. (1) The focus on the shoulder blade glide in the 5 Minute Takeaway. I can do the shoulder blade guy without rotating my torso (rib cage/obliques) so if I just focus on that I don’t get proper rotation and my hands and arms takeover. It feels like turning your rib cage with the momentum of the weight shift works best and there is some shoulder blade glide naturally toward the end of the backswing pulling the scapula into the spine. (2) weight shift seems really important to me to start the swing properly on plane so the hands and arms don’t take over. In the 5 minute series (and what I’ve watched with another prominent instructor there is a one inch lateral shift to stay on the right hip line (right handed golfers). This is discussed in early introductory videos. For me it not only starts proper momentum and natural turn it gets me in my right hip and glute. But in later videos the emphasis seems to be on just putting weight into the trail foot, which for me doesn’t have all the same positive chain reaction. Thoughts? Thanks.
January 1, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Eric. Yes there will be some natural shoulder blade glide as you rotate the rib cage in the takeaway and into the backswing. The shift will be about 1 inch. As long as you are shifting and rotating shying away from excessive lateral sway (hip line). All will be well. Some players move a little more/less in the beginning. The goal is to just make sure you do it and it happens early on in the backswing versus too late.
January 1, 2021
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Jim
Rahm vs Reed. Different grips. Rahm weaker. Shorter back. Both seem to fold the right elbow early?
September 5, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jim. All tour pros will have different quirks and methods that they have become very good at repeating. They usually don't change those by the time they reach the big stage. Take a look at Who Cares What Tour Pros Do? Video. This explains that a lot of players just have their own tricks of the trade that work for them.
September 7, 2020
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Jim
When do you stop the backswing? Is it better to stop a tad earlier to make it shorter? Does that help control? Can you explain how pros like Finau and Rahm appear to have short and compact swings, and is that a good or quirky thing?
September 5, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jim. To each their own. They have short/compact moves, but really use their leverage from the wrists and legs for good power. No need to cut the swing short, but you should start transferring back to the lead side before you finish the backswing. The backswing is maxed out when you have full shoulder rotation with the arms staying connected.
September 7, 2020
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Kevin
As we rotate in the backswing should we feel like the chest / core rotates ahead of the arms to prevent from pinning the left arm across the chest? I have a late wrist set due to my arms feeling like they are moved to the top by my turn - I feel that move is leading to some of my overswing issues but wanted to confirm my thoughts on sequence in the backswing- attached a backswing photo - appears to have a slight reverse hip shift I need to fix
April 27, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Kevin. Glad you caught the slight reverse hip shift. The feeling is a tough one to tell you. Cause it may not be the same for other students. However, it sometimes can feel like a lot of core and almost the arms/club stay behind.
April 27, 2020
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Eric
Does having your weight too forward on your toes tend to stop good body rotation? Is that why getting the weight into the right ankle is so important?
August 11, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Eric. Moving the weight toward your toes tends to make your knees the primary balancing joints. This will limit the ability to rotate properly with the hip sockets. Shortening rotation and stressing the knee joints.
August 12, 2019
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Chad
just a clarifying question. Chuck says to try and keep your hands from getting into the depth dimension on the backswing, but if I think about pulling or turning my right shoulder behind my left ear on the backswing, my hands feel like they quickly get into the depth dimension, maybe thats because my swing has been so steep?
August 3, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Chad. It's typically because you are used to over using the arms/hands. Take a look at the 4 Square Drill and Pool Noodle Drill to help you keep the arms in front as your turn.
August 3, 2019
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Nolan
What is the effect of swing weight on getting the clubhead on plane during the backswing? It seems that in order to get it on plane, I have to use more wrist strength in hinging the club and, therefore, don’t feel loose enough. Not sure if that’s because of the swing weight of my clubs.
July 31, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Nolan. The club does have weight. With that weight will come a little pressure on the hands to want to push down slightly to set the club. You don't need a ton of wrist, or leverage early to create this. Most players already add the little bit of wrist. If you have lacked wrist set in the backswing at first it may feel like a lot, but that will subside. Take a look at Wrist Cock vs. Wrist Hinge in the Golf Swing Video.
August 1, 2019
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Colman
Hello, My question concerns rotating in the drills vs rotating once I’m in posture. Obviously standing straight up it’s very easy to turn my right shoulder behind my head, but when I’m In posture (particularly with a club in hand) this move feels Impossible to execute. Is there a possible reason for this or is it due just to it being a new movement and takes time To re-train body? Thank you!
July 16, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Colman. Most of the time it is because the new movement takes some time to get trained and adjusted too. However, you may not be rotating around the spine correctly once hinged forward. Take a look at Golf Backswing Shoulder Plane Drill Video.
July 16, 2019
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Chad
This is just a Kudos to the Rotary. I've been steep for a long time and have tried everything, but it finally clicked with a bigger body turn and the left elbow rotation so its pointing straight away from you at the top of the swing. Anyone struggling with over the line at the top I encourage you to focus on your left elbow at the top, I've never heard that from anyone or anywhere other than Rotary Swing, thanks guys!!
July 15, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Chad. Awesome. Thanks for the post.
July 15, 2019
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Darryl
What are your thoughts on handle in, clubhead out on the backswing, or is it preferable to rotate the forearms?
June 30, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Darryl. The forearms need to rotate slightly to allow the proper face rotation. Ideally, missing the club head outside is better than inside. But, you would be playing danger zone of keeping the face too shut.
June 30, 2019
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Ronan
Hi I struggle with a cupped left wrist at the top. Yet, i think i turn my body enough and early, but my right arm tends to be stiff, so my my right wrist straight. Is it fine to think about the right wrist during the backswing and to place it intentionally on a good position at the top and does it have to be done another way? where could it come from? When i try to do that my top position looks good, but i'm only thinking about that and nothing else...
March 11, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ronan. Take a look at the Cupped Left Wrist Video for lead arm training. I would rather the trail wrist have a little hinge due to staying relaxed. I would actually make some trail arm only swings to see if you can delete the tension. Take a look at Creating a Swing Plane Video. Then, plug the 2 feelings together of lead and trail arm.
March 12, 2019
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Thaddieus
At what point in the backswing should I start to feel my left wrist cock up? I have to really focus on maintaining the cup in my left wrist during the takeaway and to try and get as much width as possible I actually try to keep that cupped feeling as I elevate my arms. It’s after the elevation that I rotate my left forearm as my right arm flexes. Should I be cocking that left wrist earlier in the swing?
March 3, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Thaddiues. There is a little wrist cock in the takeaway. Roughly 25% because you are 25% done with the swing. Take a look at the RST Pencil Tee Drill.
March 3, 2019
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Chad
should you be rotating your left fore arm through out the back swing so at the top your left elbow points straight away from you, make sense? It seems to help get me in a good position at the top when I do it. weird question but seems to be working. thanks again
February 9, 2019
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Dean
I think that is spot on Chad. Fore arm gradually rotates on the way back and through without trying to square the face at the last second. Swing analyzer is a powerful tool to check your theories.
February 10, 2019
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Chris
When drilling weight shift mostly downswing I feel weak trying to start downswing with my left-knee ankle, also have left knee soreness from drilling- please help
January 22, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Chris. The lead knee will rotate first, but the inner thigh adductors will be responsible for pulling the weight. Sounds like you are getting a little towards your toes in the transition and not actively engaging the inner thigh. Take a look at Fixing Your Weight Transfer and Preventing Hip Pain. Also, the transition may feel weak at first because you are actively using muscles you haven't recruited before in the swing.
January 22, 2019
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Theunie
I went to my golf club today to do some drills and putting. I watched the golfers on the driving range carefully. Very few did axis tilt, weight shift and/or proper rotation. Sadly that was also me during so many years of struggling with golf. The ignorance out there is scary. I cannot wait to get to the stage where I can properly execute the amazing advice that Chuck is giving in the videos. Thanks for a wonderful course. Theunie
January 20, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Theunie. Great post and many thanks. What I love about your post is you are starting to diagnose the issues you can see in everyday golf. Ignoring anatomy and physics. You are on the correct path.
January 20, 2019
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Theunie
Hi Gary and Craig. The way that Gary explains his uncomfortable “foot feelings” on both the back and down swings is really so good and resonates fully with my challenges. I have so wrongly in the past been too much on the balls of my feet. I’m now trying hard to find my best ankle/heel positions on both the right and left feet as per Chuck’s excellent guidelines. But it is easier said than done and I will just have to practice very hard to get it right.
January 11, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Theunie. Getting away from the balls if the feet is tough at first. But, once you find balance over the ankle joints it will feel like a much better playing position.
January 11, 2019
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Gary
Love your website and all that you teach. I'm seeing great improvements in my game. I have a question about the weight transfer during the backswing. I set up with my weight on the heels of my feet. In my backswing I transfer more weight to the right and maintain it on the heel of my right foot. During the transition/downswing the weight transfers to the heel of my left foot. The problem I'm having is that I'm still fading the ball implying that somehow I'm producing an out-to-in path. My right side is very inactive and I'm not doing an over the top move. It baffled me where the out-to-in path was coming from? What I realized is that on the backswing, I was allowing whatever weight was still on my left foot to move towards the ball of the left foot. I think this was causing me to somehow tip forward (even though the weight on my right foot is on the heel). This out of balance (subconscious) feeling also made me initiate the downswing before the completion of the backswing because of my need to catch my balance. What I did then was to keep the weight on my left foot still on the heel during the backswing. This minor adjustment has also allowed my to complete my backswing. The shots produced have straightened. I also feel my follow through is more balanced. Am I on the right track? Should I keep the weight on my left foot on the heel during my backswing if I want straight shots? Also if this is true then this means people that allow their left heel to lift during the backswing would have the tendency to naturally fade the ball. Thanks in advance.
October 5, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gary. Not necessarily an out to in path. 85% of ball flight is controlled solely by the club face. People that allow their lead foot to lift excessively tend to over shift, or allow the hips to rotate too much. What I believe happened was your weight did stay more balanced with the adjustment you made and moving towards the ball coming down was diminished. Nevertheless, I would check your shoulder spin and tush line. Keep the Rear Shoulder Back Video and Chair Drill.
October 5, 2018
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Gary
Thanks. I will check out the videos you recommended. My problematic ball flight was a straight flight to the target with a 15 yard fade at the end. My understanding is that the initial part of the ball flight was influenced by the clubface and the end is the spin caused by the difference of the clubface path vs the clubface squareness. Given that ball flight I assumed that my clubface was square to the target with an out to in path which created the fade at the end. Also I wasn't lifting my left heel. Should the whatever weight is on the left foot during the backswing be on the left heel? or does it not matter where on the left foot it is?
October 5, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gary. Ideally, you wouldn't want it going too much towards the ball of the foot because the lead knee would start too become unstable. Leading to excessive motion behind the ball and flexion.
October 5, 2018
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Marc
Hi Craig, I have a question in relation to the rotation of the head during the backswing. When I look at Chuck's swing I can see that his head rotates to the right but not nearly as much as in my swing. I have noticed that when I am bringing my shoulder blade back it tends to pull the head at the same time. Does it make sense to try to feel that the left hear stays where it is in the set up position so that I reduce the movement. When I do this in front of the mirror it seems to reduce the tendency of the head rotating to the right during the takeaway. Best, Marc
July 26, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Marc. Chuck's head rotates because his neck is fused from C1-C3 and it isn't a requirement of RST. If the head moves slightly because of the connection in the cervical spine as your rotate that is fine. But, no need to add the movement for mechanics.
July 26, 2018
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jeff
I think Marc’s question is about the head moving off the ball too much, not head rotation. I find mine does also.
December 26, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jeff. Marc actually had a head moving off the ball and rotation issue once he sent in a review to check. We had to calm down both issues. In general the head will move slightly off the ball due to shifting your weight. If your head is moving laterally too much. Take a look at Head Moving Off the Ball Video and Weight Shift Video Part 2. Make sure you are rotating properly and not laterally sliding your weight too much. If you keep having the issue let me know. Happy to provide more suggestions.
December 26, 2018
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LANDON
Hello, I just received my rotary connect. With that being said, can you please point me to each of the specific videos and directly call out which ones speak to the application and training aid of the connect for me to utilize. Thanks.
June 21, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Landon. RotaryConnect Backswing Training Aid, RotaryConnect Lower Body Drill, and RotaryConnect Chipping.
June 22, 2018
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jennifer
this could be summed up in your last sentence...shift weight to your right heel and pull your right shoulder back behind your head. this simplifies it the best.
May 31, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jennifer. Exactly. I typically tell students. Right Foot, Right Shoulder.
May 31, 2018
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William
This series is tremendous. One confusing aspect however is that in the understanding shoulder blade glide video, my understanding is that chuck is saying that the pulling back, down, and in of the right shoulder blade initiates and is the focus of the backswing. By the way, comparing it to the throwing motion is a great teaching tip. However, in this lesson my understanding is that chuck is saying that the rotation of the core initiates and is his focus of the backswing. So not sure what I should focus on to initiate the backswing, and which one takes priority over the other? Thx very much. Bill
January 23, 2018
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Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
Hi William, they both work together simultaneously. The shoulder blade glide ensures a pulling motion and centered rotation, but the obliques do the heavy lifting of rotating the torso.
January 23, 2018
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Dave
In relation to this, there is a video on the site that has to do with shortening the backswing, but I cannot find it. I must not be using the proper key words in the search for it. In it, Chuck shows how using proper upper right arm rotation you can keep from overswinging. Can you provide the link to that video? Thanks very much.
December 9, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dave. You can use "Stop Overswinging", or "3 Functions of the Right Arm." Put the titles exactly like that in the search box.
December 9, 2017
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Byron
Can you comment on the left knee and foot on the backswing, I have a tendency to point my left knee out towards the ball on my backswing and thus keeping my weight on the left side. I can't find a a video that discussed how the left knee should look like in the backswing
November 3, 2017
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Byron, looking at the swing from a face on perspective, the lead knee will be pull a little bit towards the trail side. What you are looking for as an end result to a loaded backswing, is 90% or so of the weigh in your trail side, so the lead foot should feel very light to the ground and you shouldn't feel a lot of muscle contraction in any part of lead leg. Take a look in the self analysis tool and watch the face on model swings in there for a good visual. Hope that helps.
November 3, 2017
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martin
Great video. RST has helped with consistency and added distance. The basic swing concept is easy to follow: Rotation, elevation, flexion. But I think I am hit and miss on the elevation bit. I understand how much to elevate. I think the question is when; Should your arms be partially elevated when you get to the end of the takeaway? Fully elevated? There is a tendency also to get flexion and elevation confused--they are obviously 2 separate moves. Do your arms need to be fully elevated BEFORE you flex the right arm--or is it simultaneous? Whenever I check my position at the top of the swing my army are invariably lower than they should be. Probably because you are subconsciously trying very hard not to move your arms ..when in fact you do have to move them....up....as opposed to across which all becomes a bit disorienting as you are rotating back.
October 23, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Martin. Elevation is a variable in the golf swing. You may have a little less than base of the pectorals depending on flexibility. You have to add a little elevation in the takeaway. Not a lot, but some to keep the arms in front of the sternum. Also, you will come close to reaching full elevation before flexion. It is a blended move. Take a look at the 4 Square Drill.
October 23, 2017
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Lance
This is a great video and the RST 5 step system makes a lot of sense. It seems that when I practice in the mirror and do the drills; the backswing is simple. However when I hit a shot - either at the range or in a round I 'automatically' use my arms which causes me to reverse pivot and have a steep swing plane into the ball. I have been doing the drills for about 3 months now and am struggling to put my great 'mirror swing' into action on the course or at the range. I've also watched the take your swing to the course video. Please can someone give me some advice on how to transfer my 'mirror swing' to the course for swing consistency?
October 2, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Lance. You need to perform the motion no matter what the pace properly at the course. I would advise working on small, or very slow paced tempo swings until you can do the correct move with a ball. No matter if its a 20% power 7 iron with proper mechanics. Then, gradually increase until you own it with a ball in front.
October 2, 2017
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Benjamin
I struggle with using my arms too much in the takeaway/backswing. This video really helped in the sense of using rotation in addition to the shoulder glide (I was still using my arms too much even with the glide). Now, I feel that my arms are very loose and I don't have much control over them. Is this the intended result so they just move where my body leads them?
May 22, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Benjamin. Yes, you want them relaxed so they may be led and reactionary. But, not dead with zero input.
May 23, 2017
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Miguel
Hi Chuck As an engineer I love your method. It´s simple and it makes sense. Problem is that it´s not easy to incorporate by a guy that´s being playing (trying to) for thirty years and plays tennis. I have difficulty in killing the right arm, in shifting weight and on the back swing. Let´s start with the latter: Inner core rotation is a great concept as a way to rotate the body. But you talk of inner core rotation and pulling the right shoulder behind your head. Those are two different things, two different commands to your body. Mine seems be quite stupid and does not like multiple orders. What´s your advice. Focus on one of the two? Start with inner core rotation and end up with pulling right shoulder behind the head? Practice doing both? Thanks and regards Miguel
April 5, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Miguel. I would focus as you stated using the inner core rotation and end up pulling the trail shoulder behind the head. Use the video in the link below to help you achieve the motion. Thanks for the compliments. https://rotaryswing.com/videos/full-swing-basics/rotary-swing-5-step-golf-swing-system/core-rotation-left-arm-club-rsa
April 5, 2017
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arthur john
i was truly amazed when i looked in the mirror properly to see my arm swing the club inside and narrow. i uses to feel pain in my left shoulder. no more. magoo golf.
March 29, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Arthur John. Awesome. Love hearing zero pain while swinging.
March 29, 2017
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Robert
I tried your Secret yesterday, it dramatically improved my consistency and even distance! This is the easiest way I've found to fix all those backswing problems of picking up the club, moving the arms and hands to the back, or having a "fake" backswing. Now I can concentrate on other things in my swing, like the first move forward sequence. I'm excited to get out there today and play great golf. If you don't get the backswing correct, the rest of the swing is doomed for any kind of consistency.
March 29, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Robert. Great. Very happy to hear you are seeing improved results.
March 29, 2017
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Marcus
So i combined this move with releasing the club and something weird happens. It feels like the club is going to slip out of my left hand and launch about 20 yards. I feel like it is hurting my progress because I tend to become more right hand dominant. Or I flip mu left wrist. Should I ignore that for now or is there a video you can recommend that deals with this?
March 28, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Marcus. Are you keeping the pressure in the last three fingers? (Vijay Release Drill) It is okay to feel like it is ripping out of the hand. But, it sounds like you are not keeping the pressure enough into the release and in the proper place with the lead hand.
March 28, 2017
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Marcus
I am not sure. I will need to focus on the next time. But what is the proper wrist/arm motion after impact? I feel like I am using bad habits (chicken wing) to compensate for the increased club velocity. Or am I getting ahead of myself?
March 28, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Marcus. Might be getting ahead of yourself. However, the finish is a byproduct of a proper release and swing. Not much needed there if the motion is correct into impact. If you are taking over with the trail. It will lead to a chicken wing (Cure Chicken Wing Video). Also, in the latter part of the 5 Minutes to the Perfect Release Video. Chuck will have you bring your trail hand over to feel proper extension through the shot.
March 28, 2017
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Michael
Excellent way of teaching the backswing simply and in a way that can be easily understood and followed.
March 28, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Thanks Michael.
March 28, 2017
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JODY
Chick alludes to feeling right ankle pushing in the ground - is he referring to outside right ankle or inner right ankle? Thanks
March 23, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jody. You want to shy away from getting on the outside of the trail ankle. Take a look at the Anchor to the Ground Video and the Weight Shift Video Part 2.
March 24, 2017

Most people simply move their arms and hands WAAAAAYY too much in the golf backswing. In the last 20 years of teaching, I've seen fewer than 10 golfers not move their arms and hands enough - that leaves thousands on the other side of the spectrum! So, chances are, you're also one of those golfers who's moving the club way too much with the wrong parts of the body. You're number one priority in the backswing is to get the club in a position that allows for a proper downswing. Your second priority would be loading up the big core muscles in the trunk - in that order.

If you put the club in an awful position at the top of your backswing, it's not going to make much difference how loaded up you are because you're just going to hit the golf ball a long ways offline! The secret to getting the club set at the top is to do what I talk about in the video and focus on the critical movements of the body and stop worrying about the golf club. You need to literally feel like your arms and hands do nothing.

Most people are truly shocked when I get them to realize just how much they're doing with their wrists because they already feel like they're not doing anything with them - that's part of the problem. Feel and real aren't ever the same. So what do you do?

VIDEO OR MIRROR

Your best friend in the world while working on your golf backswing is a mirror. Your second best friend is video. If you look in the mirror and the club has moved 4 feet and your body has barely turned, there's a BIG problem. Nothing is going to work out for you from there.

So, it's critical that you are diligent in paying attention to what you see happening in front of a mirror while working on your backswing. LOOK at what you're doing, don't just FEEL what you're doing because your brain is lying to you!

I'm always shocked at how many students I put in front of a mirror at our golf academy who don't look at themselves. They seem to think that I put them in front of the mirror just to reflect the sun and help even out their tan. I need you to actually WATCH yourself move - you're not being vain, you're being smart!

The mirror never lies and provides instant feedback and with the abundance of information on RotarySwing.com, you know exactly what a perfect golf backswing should look like by now, so there's no excuse not to have one! If you follow the drills WHILE watching yourself perform them in front of a mirror and SLOW DOWN at first to a pace that you can do the movement correctly, then your golf swing WILL IMPROVE. But, if you expect to improve just by watching a bunch of videos and then going out to the range and trying "feel" what I was talking about, you'll never get any better.

[00:00:06] My favorite discussion to have with golfers is whether or not they can make a full shoulder turn during the golf backswing. Almost every golfer on the planet thinks they can't make a full shoulder turn because they're not flexible enough and I can guarantee you that's not the case no matter what anybody tells you. The reality is all golfers can make a full shoulder turn. And I've been proving that for more than 20 years of getting golfers who have all kinds of back problems and spinal fusion and all kinds of limited flexibility issues and they're still making full shoulder turns. It's not hard. [31.3]

[00:00:37] It's all about understanding where you move from and at which point in the swing you do it - in other words, sequencing. And for some movement that's the whole secret to the golf swing and that's what we're focusing on today. So if you think that you can't make a full shoulder turn because you're not flexible enough pay close attention because I'm going to tell you exactly why you're not able to make a full shoulder turn doing what you're doing. And then I'll show you exactly how to fix it. [23.6]

[00:01:02] So the number one cause for golfers who don't make a full shoulder turn and it's synonymous across the board is because they take their left arm and they push it across their chest to start the golf backswing. Now I want you to do this while you're watching this video and all of a sudden light bulbs will go off in your head as to why RotarySwing makes sense and what you're doing doesn't. Take your left arm push it across your chest and tell me where you feel tension. [20.6]

[00:01:23] Immediately you're going to feel it back here in the back of your shoulder and the back of your arm. Well guess what your brain uses as a signal to start moving the other direction. Bing bing bing bing it's tension. If your body creates a lot of tension early in the backswing what's the number one thing your body wants to do with that tension. Get rid of it. Of course. [22.8]

[00:01:47] Tension is a good thing in the swing as long as you create it in the right place in your body at the right time. Almost nobody does that and that's why they struggle with the golf swing so much. It's really simple if you're following RotarySwing as we're going to teach you how to move and create tension in the right places at the right time. And that's the difference that will make you a great golfer. [15.5]

[00:02:03] If you're taking your left arm and pushing it across your chest. Now all of a sudden you've got all this tension. Why would you go any further back than this because your brain is telling you it's screaming at you. This is so tight. If we keep going any further we're going to get injured. Your brain won't let you do that. So it's going to just stop right there. And then you're going to fire down from the top before you ever make a full shoulder turn so you're going to stop turning around a half turn. How do you fix it? [25.2]

[00:02:28] Stop moving from that side of your body during the backswing. It's simple. Instead of pushing from the left side you're going to pull from the right and that's what RotarySwing been talks about. I've done many videos on push versus pull. If you go to the Web site go to rotaryswing.com and look at search for push versus pull. [15.6]

[00:02:44] You'll see that all of a sudden this stuff is going to make tons of sense so we know that if we go push our left arm across our chest we turn about halfway. Instead of pushing your left arm across your chest pull your right shoulder behind your head. Now watch what happens. Not only do I not have any intention here I can keep go and keep going keep go and keep going if I let my weight shift I can keep going keep going oh look at that I can make a huge huge shoulder turn when I move from the right side of my body. Pushing versus pulling is the essence of what rotary swing is all about. And when you start pulling you start turning. If you start pushing all of a sudden your body is going to build up so much tension at the wrong point in the swing and it's going to be too much tension too early and nobody will make a full shoulder turn. I don't care if you're Gumbi you're not flexible enough you're creating too much tension it's not the flexibility issue it's tension and timing. Tension and sequencing is the secret to what rotary swing sauce is all about. So if you want to make full shoulder turn I guarantee you you're flexible enough. Take your right shoulder pull it back behind your head let your weight shift to the right let your hip turn boom full shoulder turn. Very very simple. [1:05.5]

[00:03:50] So if this stuff resonates with you make sure you check out more of our videos and rotaryswing.com today and all of a sudden the golf swing will be made much simpler for you and much easier to understand. [9.3]

I've been teaching for a little over 20 years now and in that time, I've seen a little bit of everything, the good, the bad and the very, very ugly. When it comes to the back swing stuff, it's mind-blowingly simple to do the back swing correctly following the RST fundamentals but without fail when somebody goes through a clinic or a lesson or they've watched all the videos on the site, I still see a ton of extraneous extra movements in the swing that don't need to be there and it dramatically complicates the backswing. I'm going to talk about today just how simple the back swing is and I'm going to show you some of the secrets and things that I've used over the years to help me help my students make a simple consistent repeatable back swing. Because that's really what it's about. If the back swing is doing the same thing every time and not adding extra movements to the club, the opening the face too much or keeping it closed or moving it off plane or path or what have you, then the down swing has a much better chance to get off on the right foot, literally.

  What I want to talk about now is kind of the secret things that I've used to help beat things into my students' heads to help them understand how to make a proper back swing. The first thing that I want to talk about is body rotation. If I had to put a number one priority on something in the back swing, it would be two things but the number one would be body rotation. The second would be weight shift. These two go hand in hand so I can't really separate them because as you're turning your body, you need to be shifting your weight. If you’re not focusing on doing those two things as your primary directive in the back swing, something is going to go wrong. I guarantee it. Typically, if you don't focus on moving your body, rotating it and shifting your weight to the right for a right-handed golfer, you're going to use your arms and hands to move the club. When you use your arms and hands to move the club, you instantly start creating a lot of extra angles and rotation to the club face that doesn't need to be there and it makes it impossible for you to be a consistent ball striker.

       Instead, take all of that stuff out. Literally imagine that you can't move your arms and hands and the only reason that golf club is moving is because your body's turning and your weight is shifting. When you put those two things together, weight shift and rotation that gives you some momentum to move the golf club. If you don't do that, you're going to have to use your arms and hands to get that golf club moving.

  Think about it this way. This is a great little mental trick. Imagine that your job is to leave that club there and the only way that you can move it is not from anything up here but just using your core. What would you have to do? Well, if I shift my weight that's going to get the handle moving and as long as I keep my hands a little bit in control of the club, that's moving the club a little bit but also I'm starting to turn instinctually as I do this. Now, if I just focus on turning and shifting, the club is starting to move but my hands and arms and wrists have moved this much and my body's moved this much. That's the big mantra that I try to really beat into the slides and the clinics that I do is big body turn, tiny little arm swing. I can't emphasize it enough because nobody ever follows it correctly. Huge body turn, tiny little arm swing. Your arms should effectively almost do absolutely nothing during the back swing.

    Now, of course, that's an over statement but it's an over statement because everybody tends to do way too much with their arms and hands and not early enough with their body. If I had to give one thing, the thesis statement is big body turn, tiny little arm swing and put that right ankle into the ground while you're turning. If you can do that together, then all of a sudden the back swing because incredibly simple. Then all you have to do is focus on the stuff we talk about in the five minutes of perfect back swing video, which is arm elevation, right elbow flexion. Let this arm rotate as you do this. This is it. This is the whole movement of the arms in the back swing. It's the most important back swing secret that I can give you is that if you focus on turning your body and not moving your arms, trying to leave the club at address while you focus on pushing that right ankle to the ground and pulling that right shoulder behind your head, the back swing will be something you never struggle with again.

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