Right Arm Backswing Drill

This is an excellent drill to train your mind to use your torso rotation to move the club rather than swinging your arms around the body.

  • The Right Arm Drill helps you learn to let the torso rotation carry the arms & club back, instead of actively moving them
  • In setup position, do the shoulder elevation and right elbow flexion to "preset" the right arm
  • Hold the right arm in place while you rotate your upper torso - torso & arm rotate back as a unit, with no additional motion provided by the arm
  • After you are comfortable with the drill, add the club and left hand back in

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Joe
If I understand this correctly: At address: Axis tilt and secondary axis tilt will bring my right shoulder slightly below my left shoulder...but then on takeaway and backswing, the left shoulder somehow has to get pointed slightly downward to avoid a turn that is too flat. How does axis tilt relate to turning 90 to spine angle?
June 16, 2020
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Michael (Certified RST Instructor)
Have a look at this video: Golf Backswing Shoulder Plane Drill
June 16, 2020
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Joe
Yes, I looked at that...my turn was often too flat and that resulted in pulls....I did not realize that my right shoulder needs to go back and UP more than before...thanks.
June 16, 2020
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Michael (Certified RST Instructor)
Hi Joe Axis tilt is the angle of the spine when looking at the body from front of while the rotation of the left shoulder is in relation to the spine when looking from down the line. The rotation is perpendicular to the spine from down the line which make the left shoulder go down. secondary axis tilt is happening in the downswing. Hope that makes sence.
June 16, 2020
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Jackson
Hi Craig. In this drill, Chuck talks about keeping your upper bicep in contact with your chest. Should I do this in my actual golf swing, or just in this drill?
November 10, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jackson. The upper bicep and upper pectoral with the trail arm will have some connection. But, you don't want to glue it to your side. The key is awareness that they are remaining close to each other.
November 11, 2019
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Deborah
I have issues with a flying elbow in my back swing but have worked to resolve that. But, when I start down, my elbow seems to come back an inch or two behind me instead of straight down. If I think of leading my downswing with my left side and pulling down with my right elbow, it fixes the problem. Is that a correct feel?
October 14, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Deborah. I like the pulling down with the lead. It sounds like you are used to manually pushing the trail arm further behind you. Don't get excessive with trying to pull the trail elbow down. Let the lead do the pulling job. Nevertheless, you can get a good feeling what the trail arm should feel like doing some one arm drills (both trail and lead). Take a look at How Swing Speed Affects Compression and try to blend the two.
October 14, 2019
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Kevin
Compressed picture for comment below
September 5, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Kevin. Adding some external humeral rotation is fine (3 Functions of the Right Arm Video and Stop Overswinging Video). Looking good. May have lost a little trail knee flexion though.
September 6, 2019
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Kevin
I found this RST video on YouTube that talks about keeping the forearms close to help fix the deep/ flying right elbow - when I experiment with this idea it has helped me but I wanted to confirm rotary swing supports this video since it’s not on the site - attached a picture from my recent swing review as well https://youtu.be/unj1hkKS9xg
September 5, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Kevin. I updated the above post.
September 6, 2019
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Kevin
Thanks Craig but just to hit on the old RST YouTube video...do you support the concept of keeping the forearms closer?
September 6, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Kevin. You don't want to squeeze the life out of them together. But, when adding external humeral rotation with the trail. That's in essence what you are doing. The external rotation is keeping the trail forearm closer to the lead. Yes, that is fine as a helpful point/trigger.
September 6, 2019
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David
I think I already know the answer to this but everyone tells me that when I perform this on video the club looks "laid off". In the video examples you never get the clubhead pointing parallel to the target line. I think I have heard you say before if you kept turning it would get there but are your shoulders not already at least 90 degrees?
July 22, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello David. Yes, the shoulders are already 90 degrees. The key is the box. For your arms to stay connected to your core you would have to rotate beyond that point. It's not laid off, but simply on plane with the arms staying connected to your core. Without adding more rotation you would have to let your arms run away from your chest to reach that parallel position. Which would require a reconnection on the downswing.
July 22, 2019
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Danny
Hi craig i am 68 i am finding out that my glutes hurt so much it is hard to do the drills don't lol
June 28, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Danny. You might be over engaging, or squatting. It is normal to have soreness from new activation. However, you might be going to the extreme. Take a look at Proper Muscle Activation Video. Engaged, but not overly locked/tight.
June 29, 2019
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Craig
I have a really hard time keeping my right shoulder down and back. I thought it was caused by pushing my left arm across my chest, but it happens even when I rotate back while doing right arm only drills. This doesn't happen if I rotate with my arms across my chest, only when I start adding the arms. Any suggestions on what I need to be focusing on? Thank you!
June 9, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Craig. Where does your trail shoulder go in the backswing? Up, level, etc?
June 9, 2019
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Craig
Hi Craig, thanks for the quick reply. It moves up, like a shrugging motion.
June 9, 2019
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Paul
Hi, should both the left and right bicep on both arms feel as if they face each other throughout the whole backswing or even the whole swing. Thanks.
May 24, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Paul. The lead arm will rotate internally from the shoulder socket causing the lead bicep to feel slightly more inward at the top. However, relatively speaking they will feel much the same.
May 24, 2019
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Eric
I really like this drill and feeling. I have struggled with flying elbow for years. Once struggling in a round I came across this drill. My caddy gave me a 6 iron and I hit it like a 4 iron, power of properly loaded right arm a catapult. I have learned there are three deadly causes of the flying elbow: (1) poor alignment, in my case I tend to set up with my hips too open and I stop rotating with my hips and my arms and right elbow finish the swing, (2) poor rounded shoulder posture - I work at a computer every day, this immobilizes the spine and also turns out the left elbow and the arms finish the swing, and (3) setting up right side dominant and wrenching the right shoulder in, hands over to a weak grip and right elbow point away from target versus elbow pit up. If you don’t think these are impactful, do this drill with any of these preset conditions and you will not be able to get your elbow pointing down. So, I get proper alignment with feet, knees, hips shoulders, I do the shoulder shrug fully (make sure go down to connect to core), and I make sure I put my left hand on with access tilt and hand under with elbow pit facing away from body. When I swing I thing about weight shift and rotation into the backswing position created by this drill. And you get the magic right elbow i’ve Been seeking.
April 12, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Eric. Great post and happy to read you are starting to correct the dreaded flying elbow. This post and story will be very good for our other members to read and make the same great changes in their swing.
April 12, 2019
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Mark
Having struggled with lead arm push and excessive head sway on the takeaway, this video has cured the problem instantly. The advice of keepin your trail arm bicep and chest together as you rotate your shoulder back really helps synchronise the movement of your arms and torso. However I have noticed on video playback that my swing appears to have lost some width at the top. Is this normal or am I over doing the advice?
April 1, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Mark. I would check to make sure you aren't adding more than 90 degrees of flexion with your trail arm (3 Functions of the Right Arm Video). And, that you are still adding elevation (4 Square Drill Video).
April 2, 2019
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Hector
I try to keep right elbow pit straight to rotate back , how I can rotate and at the same time to keep the connection with my biceps and chest ? How can I blend those movements ?? When I keep my right arm close to the chest I feel I can’t rotate to much !!! Help
August 23, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Hector. It's the upper bicep and upper pectoral. If you try to keep the arm glued to the side it will inhibit your rotation and create a little excessive tension. A good visual would be the RotaryConnect Backswing Video.
August 23, 2018
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Gary
Q re rotation. In some earlier videos we are told to keep our hips quiet as we rotate. In later videos we are told it is okay to turn our hips slightly to enable rotating so our back is to the target. Which is correct? It does seem there is an advantage if one can rotate effectively, keep hips quit and get back to the target. I look forward to your reply. Thanks, Gary in San Diego.
July 19, 2018
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Howard (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Gary. The initial rotation in the takeaway will come from the torso to create separation; the hips do very little. In order to get our shoulders fully turned in the second half of the backswing, our hips will need to rotate back, but this is not an active rotation. Think of your hips being pulled back to about 45 degrees by the continued rotation of your shoulders, which ultimately reach 90 degrees at the top of the backswing.
July 19, 2018
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jennifer
thank you...this was great. I was getting my right arm to deep at the top of my backswing causing me to swing too inside out on the downswing and getting stuck and I couldn't figure out why. this eliminated that problem!
June 12, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jennifer. Glad you liked the video!
June 12, 2018
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Gary
For some reason I was unable to leave a comment above. I agree with Jenifer. This drill clarifies the issue makes it simple . Why then do you have a video recommending that we keep the right arm as straight as possible on the back swing? I did not find that simple! It added confusion and frustration to the swing. Gary in San Diego. Thanks,
July 12, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gary. The vast majority of players over fold their trail arm leading to lack of shoulder turn. And, proper shoulder rotation in the backswing is a must! Keeping the trail arm straight acts a piston on the shoulder to continue to turn. Folding too early kills this. A very few minority actually keep it straight too long. Sorry for the frustration and confusion.
July 12, 2018
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Gary
The video telling us to keep our right arm straight as long as possible made sense when i watched it but I found it difficut to do. It contained no guidance on how to use or what to do with the right arm. On the other hand, the right arm backswing drill made a great of sense, had a simple explanation of what to do with the right arm, is easy to do and hopefully will be extremely helpful hitting balls. I found it especially effective in making the shoulder turn a great deal easier to accomplish, that is, pulling it around. Q: why even have the other video?
July 13, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gary. The 3 Functions of the Right Arm will also compliment the above video as well. And, I'm glad it has made the swing easier for you. We have the other video because 95% of our students overly fold the trail arm leading to a lack of shoulder turn. I can usually bet a student in a lesson 100 bucks to keep the right arm straight to a full complete backswing and I have never lost my 100. Too much flexion is a very common fault and difficult to overcome. You are in the minority of players. A good thing for you, but the video made it a little complicated for you. I apologize.
July 13, 2018
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Gary
Thanks Craig! Much appreciated!
July 13, 2018
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Eric
This is a great drill, but I just wanted to get some feedback on another drill. I struggle to get my right elbow pointing down in my backswing. Which leads to an over the top pull or slice. I started doing on arm swings. Apparently Ben Hogan did this 50 times an day and many pros like Price and Faldo hit many balls on the range with their trailing arm only. I’ve always struggled with a proper shoulder glide (blade down and in). When you do the right arm only swings your arm naturally does an external rotation and your right elbow points down. I realized that this is another way to feel the Rotary Swing shoulder glide down and in toward the spine. After three or four right arm swings I hit a ball and think about the RST and it is much more natural, smooth and strong. Hitting the ball really straight and far. Seems like another way to teach the shoulder glide. Thoughts?
June 9, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Eric. Yes, the right arm drill is great for feeling the rotation of the trail shoulder blade. However, if you tend to be an over the topper/slicer. Make sure you practice weight shift and lead side control coming down with the trail shoulder staying back. How to Fix Plane and Path Video.
June 10, 2018
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Alasdair
Can you please explain or show in a video the feeling of the right arm after this drill from a normal set up and backswing? The drill makes sense but obviously you dont swing like this and i struggle to then transfer this over to a normal swing. Thanks
April 10, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Alasdair. Will see what I can do. In the meantime, you can reach the same position in the 3 Functions of the Right Arm and the 5 Minutes to the Perfect Backswing.
April 10, 2018
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Frank
Keeping the right arm connected (bicep to lay) seems counter to maximizing right arm extension to increase backswing width. How do I maximize time ft arm is at full extension while keeping the connection?
October 11, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Frank. Keeping awareness between the upper pectoral and bicep shouldn't hurt your ability for maximum extension. In fact, keeping the trail arm in front will act as a piston on your trail shoulder to help you rotate more and maintain width.
October 11, 2017
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Benson
this video was a godsend. clarified the exact issue i've been having about what the right arm and elbow do for the backswing. my only question now is, does the right forearm maintain that 90 degree angle to the right upper arm at the top of the swing? i.e. if the angle becomes less than 90 degrees then something has gone wrong/using the wrong muscles or overdoing something? i find that trying to get to that upper right arm parallel to the ground and right forearm perpendicular to the ground is quite difficult and i end up causing the above angle issue. i'm wondering if this is a flexibility issue or a technical issue. possibly one of those push versus pull things. e.g. when i push from left on backswing it's stuck and cant get good turn but with the pull i can get full shoulder turn easily with no restriction. would love some insight.
July 11, 2017
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hi Benson, Yes, the angle is gradually increased from the takeaway into the backswing and should be at the correct amount of flexion at the top of the backswing. If you increase the angle too much, your lead arm will start to bend. You need to train less flexion in the arm if this is the case. See the 3 functions of the right arm to further help you.
July 18, 2017
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Jim
Craig, (thank you for your patience with my questions, they are clearing a lot up for me) I can really see RST building a new swing for me. I do see a lot of pros with their trail arm out to the side at the top and some way out. Can you give me some insight on that, as that is not what Chuck is talking about. Thanks again. Jim
January 29, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jim. Let's think about it for a second. Some critical/objective thinking. Don't worry I will still provide the answer . When the trail arm points away from or is outside of the body. What does that do anatomically to the scapula/shoulder blade? The scapula actually has to rotate counter clockwise which causes a loss of connection to the core. This causes a few issues. 1) The arms are now free to swing back as far as they want. 2) It doesn't allow you to add core rotational speed on the downswing (due to disconnection). 3) And, the trail arm will tend to get stuck on the downswing more than likely leading to an early cast into the strike. Some players get their arm into the flying trail arm position. But, they have practiced enough to overcome the fault by being patient and waiting for the reconnection in the downswing to add power. It adds a lot of variables to the equation. Nevertheless, you can play from there. But, it will take a lot of repetitions to keep from over-swinging and getting in sync coming down.
January 30, 2017
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Barry
A shoulder injury makes it impossible for my right (trail) arm/elbow to remain at 90 degrees at the top of the backswing like Chuck. My elbow points away from my body. Am I doomed to fighting my swing?
September 2, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Barry. It will be hard to have a link to your core for additional speed. Think of throwing a baseball from a flying right arm position versus down. We understand that some players will have limitations due to injured body parts or age. Make up for the trail arm positioning by allowing for some more forearm rotation to at least keep the club matching the plane line.
September 4, 2016
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John
This was recommended after my first swing review. I don't understand what you mean by connection between the right bicep and right pec. Do they both feel tensed? Don't understand what feeling you're describing. I'm having problems keeping the right arm in the correct position on the backswing. Mine winds up behind my head, deep, at the top of the back swing.
December 22, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello John. You aren't looking to lock or tense the bicep/pectoral together. More of awareness that they are still touching. The connection is there, but you aren't plastering them together. Take a look at the 3 Functions of the Right Arm for more help.
December 22, 2015
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Richard
Richard, For some reason I have developed golfer's elbow (medial epicondylitis) in my right elbow. What might I be doing in my swing to cause this?
October 3, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Richard. Over practicing can easily cause golfers elbow. Other, than a little rest check a few things for me. Right Elbow Pit at Address Video. Make sure the elbow pit is pointed away. Also, the 3 Functions of the Right Arm. That you aren't trying to over do flexion and/or external humeral rotation.
October 3, 2015
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Matt
Hi, I have been struggling to get the right arm perpendicular to the ground. Wouldn't the right arm be at a an angle with your spine angle since we at bend over during the swing where as when doing the top of backswing standing straight up and down the right arm would be perpendicular to the ground? My issue is that when I get my right arm perfectly perpendicular when I am bent over, my left arm bends. Would losing right bicep and chest connection be a cause because I know I am getting good rotation with the left arm.
July 8, 2015
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Matt
Oh and I also know it is not the right arm over bending because of have played with the amount of flexion at the top and the left arm still want to bend unless I strain it
July 8, 2015
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Josh
I feel like it's so tough to keep my left arm straight so I thought maybe it's what I am doing with my right arm. I feel like I am doing all of this properly but I have trouble getting the left arm in position and straight without straining. Any ideas to help? It's when my right arm folds and pulls my left arm back. Should there be some strain in the left arm? I know all should feel pretty relaxed.
June 3, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Josh. If you fold the right arm beyond 90 degrees the left arm will have to bend. To me it sounds like you aren't allowing the left arm to rotate. One of the functions of folding the right correctly is to allow the left arm to rotate. You can see the rotation well in the Using the Wrist Efficiently Video (Introduction Advanced Section) and the Checkpoints Video (Backswing Section).
June 3, 2015
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orlando
I had a TPI evaluation and found I have "limited right arm supination." I have noticed when I see my swing on video that I never get the right arm rotation necessary to get the club properly set. I always just figured I had to try harder to do so but now realize I have an issue. I will try some PT for possible relief but are there any tips for someone like me with limited right arm rotation?
May 28, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Orlando. Clay discusses this in the Fix the Flying Elbow Advanced Backswing Section. Just a little tough for you. Do you have any range of motion at all? If you can get some work to the best of your ability and upload a swing to one of our instructors. Let him know the issue.
May 28, 2015
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orlando
I do have some range of motion sure. The TPI test is to hold your arms out in front of you with palms up. My left points pretty well straight up while my right is at about a 45° angle. I'll check the video thx!
May 28, 2015
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Bill
How do you best keep your right arm flexion at 90 degrees? My right arm wants to go much further to an acute angle.
March 15, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Bill. You need some External Humeral Rotation. It will help you maintain the 90 Degree Angle. Take a look at the Over Swinging Video and the 3 Functions of the Right Arm in the Advanced Backswing Section.
March 16, 2015
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Bill
Will do, thanks Craig!
March 16, 2015
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Björn
hi, first of all, I really love your website and the way you teach the golfswing.. one of my (main) problems is moving the arms too much and being wide in the back swing. Looking at my own backswing at the top, my arms are much more behind than in this video. but what I'm wondering; looking at e.g. the rory backswing in this video: http://www.rotaryswing.com/videos/tour-pros/adam-scott-vs-rory-mcilroy-analysis ... His arms are also pretty wide.. Am I not looking correctly or why is it this is not a problem in his backswing (besides he has more talent hitting a ball than me ). Thx! Björn
February 1, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Bjorn. I apologize for the late reply. McIlrory does stay wide, but gets a touch deep. He has to make corrections on the downswing because of this. He used to fight a big hook. A lot of that came from getting stuck and having to flip the hands. Some of his "stuckness" was because of the deep action at the top. A little deep, spin the hips and the hands will have to catch up. Creates a timing issue. He does get some practice time though to have great timing .
February 17, 2015
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Darren
Hi have been given this drill as part of my review, I can perform it perfectly without the club and ball but always get right elbow moving away from my side when swinging as it is no longer preset in place can you tell me when to bend right arm in back swing also struggling with the rotation to lock right elbow into place
January 2, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Darren. Take a look at the Over Swinging Video and Fix the Flying Elbow Video in the Advanced Backswing Section. If the trail arm is coming away, you probably lack external humeral rotation. The Over Swinging Video will cover that topic as the flying elbow video will make sure you have the flexibility to perform it. The trail arm starts to fold a touch after the takeaway is completed.
January 3, 2015
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Tyler
I struggle with a deep right elbow. So not even thinking about the left arm during the take away would benefit me? Thanks!
November 19, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Tyler, Yes, that's correct. the only thing you want to focus with the arms in the backswing is keeping them straight and your hands in front of the sternum until you get to the top of the backswing. Watch Trevor Immelman's backswing. You won't see a more "RST perfect" backswing from a tour pro out there. http://www.rotaryswing.com/videos/tour-pros/trevor-immelman-golf-swing-analysis R.J.
November 19, 2014
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Steve
how many 5 minute drills can you do at time? Do you have to master 1 before the other and do them in sequence?
November 18, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Steve, If you're going to be constantly working on your swing, it would be best to get at least 1,000 reps of one drill in before stacking on top of it. If you do it that way, it only takes 11 weeks to develop a perfect swing with 5,000 reps of each drill. Make sure that when you stack, you're still doing the previous week's drill on top of the new drill. R.J.
November 18, 2014
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Steve
Thank you, that makes perfect sense. I think we all get anxious and want to move forward to quickly.
November 19, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Steve, Awesome! You're welcome. I'm looking forward to seeing your improvement! Good luck! R.J.
November 19, 2014
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Pat
This video locks up.
September 16, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Pat. I have checked the video on our end and is playing properly. It might be a browser issue. Try Chrome or Firefox.
September 16, 2014
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Greg
Hello. I was given several exercises, including this one. The flying elbow and overswinging exercises both indicate to set your right arm like you describe it in this drill but then to rotate it out 20-30 degrees, which makes no sense to me. I believe in connection in the swing (Jimmy Ballard) and it seems the way you teach it here is right and what they teach in those other two drills is contrary. Please explain. Thanks!
September 14, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Greg. When fixing the flying elbow and using the right arm to support your plane. You need external humeral rotation to rotate the scapula clockwise. This motion actually connects the core to the arm. Getting the scapula in the rotated position allows you to add speed from your rotation in the downswing. Take a look at the 3 Functions of the Right Arm in the Advanced Downswing Section to master the right arm position.
September 14, 2014
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Greg
Thanks Craig. I will take a look at the right arm section to understand it better. My issue is not a flying elbow but the reverse, where my elbow is in and around my body too much.
September 15, 2014
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Michael (Certified RST Instructor)
When I keep the right elbow in and get to a great position at the top, I get sore on the inside of my elbow joint. Especially when I do alot of reps to ingrain the move. What can cause the pain?
August 26, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
That's odd. You should be the opposite. Following the proper function of the elbow joint. Are you forcing it too much, or locking the elbow? The arm needs to be relaxed, not locked into position and straining the motion. Use the Fix You Flying Elbow Video in the Advanced Backswing Section. Check your flexibility. You might only have a little and forcing the external humeral rotation too much.
August 26, 2014
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Dan
My right shoulder is not cooperating and to get the elbow pointing straight down like that hurts a lot. If you look at Henrik Stenson's right elbow and forearm position at the top, that's about what I'm able to attain. But if you look at Adam Scott his right elbow points straight down to his rear. Would Henrik's be a reasonable compromise? With my limited shoulder movement it may be the closest I can get. Obviously Henrik is a solid player and far richer than me due to his golf, so my thinking is it's probably close enough. Just wanted your guy's thoughts. Thanks!
August 23, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Dan. Is it a mobility issue? Take a look at the Fix the Flying Elbow in this section. Check your flexibility. You might not have the ability to get the elbow straight down. If you can, we need to work on your external humeral rotation. If you can't, there are ways to work around it and still make your swing efficient.
August 23, 2014
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Dan
It is definitely a mobility issue, my right shoulder is about HALF as flexible as the left (ODD) so I'm working on that. If I do as suggested in this video with my right forearm, then rotate my body until my left hand meets the right hand I end up with my hands very low with a much shorter backswing. I think my middle and lower back is not very flexible and I've been using arm swing to keep distance rather than body turn.
August 26, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dan. You want to get as much as you can, but I see mobility is a little bit of an issue. Try adding some shoulder elevation to get arms up. Take a look at the 3 Functions of the Right Arm in the Advanced Downswing Section. See if the right arm can reach the base of your pectoral.
August 26, 2014
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Mark
Chuck states in the video that the right arm "upper bicep and chest are touching" in the backswing. Does he really intend to state that the upper tricep and chest are touching."
August 10, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Mark. The right upper bicep and chest will maintain the connection. You don't want to glue the right tricep to your side. Take a look at the 3 Functions of the Right Arm in the Advanced Backswing Section. The right arm will leave while adding shoulder elevation.
August 10, 2014
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John
Wow this is a wonderful video. What would you recommend to watch for videos after this one. I've been an accross the body back swinger and this feels soo different and compact. Thanks, John
July 31, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey John. Combine this with the 3 Functions of the Right Arm in the Advanced Backswing Section. It will help you master everything the right arm needs to do in order to support plane and keep the arms from moving across the chest.
July 31, 2014
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Doug
I don't really get this. I'm left handed and too create width in the swing I need to extend (keep straight) my left arm in backswing. The issue is it becomes a bit disengaged from the body. Off course, at some point, it has to fold. If the vid is more a conceptual or "feel" type vid that is fine but I'm wrestling with how to get this *somewhat* correct.
July 22, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Doug. Take a look at the 3 Functions of the Right Arm Video in the Backswing Advanced Section. It goes into a little more detail than this video. Understand all aspects. It will come away from the body a little. You just want to maintain the upper bicep and chest connection.
July 22, 2014
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Ji
at this point, should the left wrist be flat?
June 22, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ji. For Right handed or left handed? For right handed, the left wrist will be flat once the proper amount of flexion is added from the right. For left handed, the left wrist will have some "set" and a little "hinge" in this position.
June 22, 2014
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Ji
My hand is currently cupping (?) at the top of the swing, how can I fix that?
June 23, 2014
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jacques
hi..right arm drill. is it contrary to what Chuck shows by keeping the right arm straight. Jacques 116734
May 26, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jacques. The right arm has to have flexion to support plane and power at the top of the swing. The tendency for most people is to fold the right arm excessively too much and stop rotating with the right shoulder going to the top. It's rare for a person to actually have the ability to keep the right arm straight throughout their backswing. The more we focus on keeping the right arm straight. The less flexion to possibly occur. Leading to more shoulder turn and wider arc at the top. The right arm does need too bend. However, we need to make sure we are still turning as it is folding.
May 26, 2014

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