Golf Takeaway, 5 Minutes to the Perfect Golf Takeaway

This 30 minute long golf instruction video is key to setting you on the right path for the entire golf swing. Once you've mastered setup and rotation, work on your golf takeaway and see yourself in positions you always struggled to attain in less than 5 minutes!

  • Cocking the right wrist or pushing with the left arm can move the club, but do not provide rotation during the golf takeaway
  • Remember "REF" for the backswing - Rotation, Elevation, Flexion
  • You're looking for "Big body turn, little arm swing"
  • Practice rotating just your chest at first - you should get about 45 degrees, keeping arms in front of your body
  • Practice elevating your arms in the vertical plane
  • Combine elevation & rotation to create the swing plane
  • Finally, add a small weight shift to the drill

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Robert
When I was a member a couple years ago before back surgery there was an actual workout plan to follow with recommended reps like they show in this video. Where did that stuff go? I do much better when I have a road map laid out in front of me. Takes all of the guess work out of things. Yes I have watched all of the DEAD drill videos and the AXIOM webinar. Thank you!
April 3, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Robert. The workout sheets? Go to Swing Reviews ---> Checkpoints for Practice.
April 5, 2021
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Hector
MY QUESTION IS ?? IF I KEEP THE WRIST AS QUITE AS POSSIBLE IN THE TAKEAWAY , WHATS THE THINKING IN THE TAKEAWAY ? IT IS RIGTH SHOULDER BACK SOON ? IT IS THE LEFT SHOULDER DOWN AS SOON AS THE TAKEAWAY STARTS ? WHATS THE FEELING ? PLEASE DONT TELL ME ABOUT SEEN VIDEOS , TELL ME WHAT THE FEELING , THANKS
October 20, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Hector. The wrist will be quiet, but set a little due to the weight of the club head as you swing back. The trail wrist will remain relatively flat as the lead wrist will maintain some of the original cupping as it sets. I left more information on your other post about the feeling and seeing the move to help you proceed. You can also post it on the Facebook page which I forgot to mention in your other post.
October 20, 2020
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Eric
I’ve said this before, but to me this is the most valuable video on the site. I’ve watched it at least 10 times. One little nuance that I didn’t pick up on, and Chuck calls it out, is not starting the turn with the hips, the obliques and shoulder/lat will eventually pull the the hips. This was a transformative move for me, especially combined with working with the RotaryConnect between my legs, proper posture that allows rotation, and proper muscle activation that doesn’t make me fire in the down swing (off plane) with the right shoulder, arms and hands. It just occurred to me that Ben Hogan emphasizes quiet hips in his 5 Modern Fundamentals. Second drawing.
September 19, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Eric. Great. Glad you like the video. The hips have a role will and get pulled by the core muscles the more your rotate.
September 20, 2020
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John
Craig , I don’t understand why my post was taken down...I used the Tiger illustration was that a problem ? I don’t know...
September 14, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello John. More than likely cause it was a slide from the Clinic, or PDF. The suggestion if you forgot was Role of the Right Arm Video.
September 14, 2020
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John
Ok ,I didn’t know I couldn’t do that ,thought the illustration would make things easier.... Thanks for the video suggestion..
September 14, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello John. No worries. All good on our end.
September 14, 2020
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Eric
This is probably my favorite video. I do think the path to destruction happens here. My biggest issues were (a) not elevating and getting stuck behind me, and (b) weight shift. On the weight shift I see in this video here the one inch or so weight shift (only other video series I watched is old Leadbetter where he sticks a shaft in the ground and talks about bumping the shaft. Other places you talk about just getting weight into the right ankle. When I do this I don’t get as complete of a weight shift which leads to less momentum back and I end in a less rotated flying elbow even with focus on elevation and rotation as I move away from the right hip line. Can you explain these two swing thoughts the one inch hip lateral move weight shift and the weight into the ankle? I have a naturally very steady head so I don’t know how that factors in?
August 9, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Eric. The weight will move laterally and rotationally as you start to shift back (Weight Shift Part 2, How to Swing From the Ground Up and My Golf Backswing Secrets Videos). The takeaway doesn't have as much hip rotation as a full swing, but will rotate a little. The bump of the hip makes me think slide too much. The pressing of the ankle helps you start to load the glute without swaying the hips. You have to be careful just to move the hip laterally as you will start to lose all of you axis tilt (How to Fix Reverse Pivot Video).
August 10, 2020
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Eric
Ok, thanks. The weight shift part 2 video was great. He talked about getting some lateral movement in that video. In the 5 minutes to a perfect takeaway he talked about one inch. I agree it can be dangerous leading to a slide. What messed me up for a while was starting with that one inch lateral movement and then starting the rotation (sequentially versus simultaneously). If I start the lateral weight shift with the rotation I stay on the hipline and crease my pants. I did this at the range yesterday and never hit such a high percentage of quality shots (I've turned REF into WREF to remember the weight shift). If I just think of weight into ankle (no one inch lateral shift) even simultaneously with the rotation I move away from the hip line to the target and starting a reverse pivot. Teaching my son to play golf and I want to make sure he has proper concepts to avoid 30 years of bad golf. : )
August 10, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Eric. WREF is great. Combo of lateral and rotational. I understand about trying to get him on the proper path. Like where your thinking is at with him and the swing move with weight.
August 10, 2020
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Eric
Craig, sorry for beating a dead horse and thank you for your responses. Ok, I think I figured it out. I have been hitting some great golf shots and then so not so great - pulls or pushes. When I have been starting my swing with putting weight into my right ankle, I have done it first then started my rotation, which results in a flying elbow. I think this is what you are trying to tell me. If I put weight into my ankle and simultaneously start my rotation from my right side (and elevation) my arms get moved back on plane (elbow pit up). IT makes sense, Chuck has the right heal stomp drill, when you do that with relaxed arms you get a natural hip turn and rotation. When I put weight into my right ankle SIMULTANEOUS with rotation I don't have to think about lateral movement, it happens on its own. I have been practicing swinging next to a kitchen counter at hip level. Is this what you were trying to tell me?
August 11, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Eric. That horse is begging for mercy . ha. Yes. That is what I am trying to say. Golf swing dynamic. Not in static pieces.
August 11, 2020
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Eric
Ha, ha....Creasing my right pant leg, feels damn good! THANKS
August 11, 2020
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Brian
Is a checkpoint for the wrist flexion/extension staying the same at the end of the takeaway (where the club is parallel to the ground), that the face is perpendicular to the ground. Most teachers are saying have it parallel to the spine. And Chuck says to have the clubface parallel to the spine in this position for the downswing to square the face early. Just wondering why the takeaway is different?
July 28, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Brian. You don't want to fight the design of the golf club. The club is squaring on the way down which is why it is different. Toe up/slightly toe down is fine for both parallel positions. Take a look at the Shake Hands Drill and Forearm Rotation in Golf Swing Videos.
July 28, 2020
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Brian
Cheers Craig.
July 29, 2020
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gwan
Takeaway - I notice when I make the takeaway that my left bottom cheek starts to appear. I don't see that with Chuck. Am I doing something wrong?
July 26, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gwan. It would be tough without seeing it. Could you post an image?
July 27, 2020
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gwan
Belly botton drill - I don't understand how you can keep it perpendicular to the belly button without moving the hips. I can keep it relatively perpendicular to the chest but the belly button is really difficult.
July 26, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gwan. The hips can turn in a little in the takeaway. You just don't want lots of active rotation. As you elevate the (4 Square Drill and Belly Button Drill) it will help keep the club in front of the sternum/chest. It won't be perfect with the belly button.
July 27, 2020
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Eric
I think this is the most important video on the site. I’ve struggled with the left shoulder push. You really have to have the right feel of the right side (shoulder and obliques) or you end up trying to pull with your right arm. Left side pushers are over the toppers that get stuck behind. Not adding the elevation and proper weight shift makes that even worse. I kind of feel like REF should be REW (w is for weight shift) since if you do all this right you will get proper flexion without thinking about it? If you so this right it feels like the left arm is a piston giving the right arm the last few degrees of vertical, loading it like Hogan’s power elbow. What I have also learned through many frustrating rounds is that if you do all this right, and you have bad posture, especially rounded shoulders you are still going to atruggle with some off-line flight. For me it is a push or an unintentional fade as my right elbow has a slight flying aspect to it (although nowhere near that caused by the left shoulder push, and lack of elevation and weight shift). Sorry for the term paper, make sense? Hoping others can avoid my mistakes. Thanks
June 18, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Eric. The "W" happens much earlier in sequence so it would be tough the change the order of the acronym because that would show it as being last. Yes, flexion will happen automatically, but some players need a friendly reminder not to allow for too much. But, I do think you have something cooking correctly in our swing.
June 18, 2020
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Eric
I guess "WRE" is not a great acronym. : ) Thanks Love this video, if you do this right and have an understanding of the rest of the swing you are going to play some very good golf.
June 18, 2020
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Keith
I have watched and worked on all the rotation exercises. The shoulder blade glide is easy when my arms across the chest but when I put a club in my hands because my right arm and shoulder are lower it seems to change things. Do I still just think about the right shoulder pulling backwards. The shorter the club it seems as if you’re almost rotating vertically it’s the bending over with different club lengths I think that mess me up. Do I have to consciously think of how to turn the shoulder such as more vertically or do I just begin to turn it and pull it I’m somewhat confused
March 27, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Keith. Still concentrate on pulling back around the spine. Golf Backswing Shoulder Plane Drill. However, try to feel your core more for help. Body Rotation in Golf Backswing - Chair Drill Video. Rotate around the spine, but try to recruit abs/obliques for rotation help.
March 27, 2020
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Keith
When I complete takeaway do I then bend the right arm (felxation) and finish the turn or does that happen naturally as I continue to finish the turn ?
March 27, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Keith. After the takeaway you should continue to turn. The flexion of the trail arm will be inevitable. The goal is not to over do it.
March 28, 2020
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Gary C
As I practice my takeaway I am noticing that when I get a full, relaxed 45 degree turn in my upper body that my hips get pulled open slightly by the end of the takeaway move. When my hips remain perfectly quiet and square I seem to struggle to get a full and relaxed 45 degree turn with my upper body. I have been focusing on getting into my correct setup and then shifting my weight to the right and then performing the shoulder rotation for the takeaway. I feel my right glute engage and my weight firmly planted into the heel/ankle of my right foot and I feel as though I am turning into the right leg and my lower body is remaining stable and quiet until the very end of the 45 degree shoulder turn and then my hips open slightly. I have rewatched this video and also some videos of Tiger's swing from down the line and it looks like both chuck and tiger have slightly rotated hips by the time their club is parallel to the ground. Should I be focusing on keeping my hips perfectly square and quiet through the takeaway or is it acceptable or natural for the hips to "come with" the shoulders a little. I have practiced 4000 reps on the chair drill and feel as though I am getting good separation between my upper and lower body during the shoulder turn but it feels more natural and relaxed when the hips open slightly.
March 10, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gary. Perfectly natural to have a little bit of hip rotation. The goal is not to force the hip rotation and that it is being pulled by the shoulder movement.
March 11, 2020
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Evan
Hi there, I have been practicing this and what I have noticed is one thing in particular: when I put the club on my belly button and attempt a 90% torso turn to the point where the club is still perfectly perpendicular to my belly button AND in a perfect, toe up position at 9 o’clock, this is impossible for me. It seems the club must to some degree be a little past 90 degrees in order to accomplish this, because I can’t be the only person who can’t get their belly button to face directly behind them without much of a hip turn with little effort. Is this the case that though my belly button won’t be DIRECTLY facing behind me, the club will be doing this? I’m just simply nowhere near that flexible, and like Chuck said you can get to around 45 degrees torso turn so it just doesn’t make sense to me that you can get the club to 3 o’clock without some sort of minor push back from the arms? Thanks and sorry for the inconvenience!
January 23, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Evan. The takeaway will only require 45 degrees of rotation. As you add that rotation the arms must elevate some to keep the club in front of you (4 Square Drill). You don't have to get the belly button completely facing behind you. In real life the club will start coming away from the belly button before it reaches parallel to the ground.
January 24, 2020
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Evan
Ok thank you for your reply. Just to clarify-the butt of the club will be marginally lateral to your belly button when the club is parallel to the ground during the takeaway?
January 28, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Evan. Yes, it won't be perfectly aimed at it.
January 29, 2020
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Hector
I have been trying to master this movement but I can't . i tend to shrug my shoulders in the takeaway and pick up the club for years. Any drill ??? help .
October 24, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Hector. You need to isolate rotation until you can do it without shrugging and adding tension. Work on the Golf Backswing - Chair Drill and then DEAD Drill 1. Even though that will be a full move. Isolate doing body correctly first. Delete the shrug.
October 25, 2019
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Michael
I understand that in setup your arms are supposed to hang freely from the shoulders, but do they typically sit on top of the chest, or to the sides? I've been struggling with this a lot lately.
October 11, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Michael. It may be a little different for players depending on chest size. Barrel chest, wide, narrow, etc. You want the elbow pits facing away and the arms in front of the chest where you can feel a connection of the upper bicep and upper pectorals. While not having the arms so squeezed inward, or externally rotated that you can't stay tension free.
October 11, 2019
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Michael
Trying to get that tension free feeling is what I struggle with. I have pretty broad shoulders and if I let my arms hang down and then grip the club, I squeeze the sides of my chest and on the downswing my arms want to work back away from me rather than down to the ball and I hit shanks or I get stuck and hit fat shots. I've seen another video (not on the site) that talks about setup; putting your arms straight out while standing straight up, letting them naturally fall into the chest and then hinging from the hips to get to the ball. I have done that, and that is very close to where my arms want to hang but I feel my arms and shoulders can rotate without my body turning (not picking up the club, but just not feeling the same load).
October 11, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Michael. Take a look at Golf Grip Checkpoint Tips and How Far to Stand Away from the Golf Ball. Try to get them resting in front, but you need to shy away from the excessive squeeze tension.
October 11, 2019
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M. (Certified RST Instructor)
Hi Graig, if I understand the backswing correct, you first turn shoulders, at last 45 degree and then hips also 45 degree, Total about 90, now your back is pointing at target and you are in a good position. What if a golfer is flexibel and abal to rotate shoulders 80 - 90 degree and then 45 hips. Now he/she is turned 125 -135 degree. If that is so are you still in a good position at end of backswing? If so, what is benefit of being able to make such a large rotation? Thanks for helping!
August 9, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Marcel. If you are that flexible you would be recruiting more muscle fiber and torque. You will have a better short stretch cycle. The muscles will rebound faster for more speed. However, getting that much sometimes comes at a cost to other mechanics (trail leg, etc). I would check the student to make sure they aren't adding crazy lead shoulder protraction. Take a look at Left Shoulder Push in Backswing Video.
August 9, 2019
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M. (Certified RST Instructor)
I found also the Stop Overswinging video to understand more what happens. Thanks for helping!
August 11, 2019
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Roger (Certified RST Instructor)
Craig, In a post below you mention a video (using the wrists effectively and efficiently), is that video still on the site? If not, what do you focus on with left or right or both wrist to gain a kinesthetic awareness that the wrist or wrists are cocking gradually and that the cocking does not cause more lead or left side push during the takeaway? Thanks!
July 15, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Roger. Using the Wrists in the Golf Swing Video. The title was updated since that post. I apologize. Usually one will feel a little weight on the club and it would be a little wonky to not allow for any set. Take a look as well at Wrist Cock vs. Wrist Hinge Video.
July 15, 2019
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Dan
Is there no forearm rotation in the takeaway? The certification manual doesn't mention forearm rotation until Move 2, but I don't see how it's possible to end up in the "shaking hands" position without at least a little forearm rotation. If there was no forearm rotation, wouldn't you end up with the right hand slightly on top of the left? But it looks like they end up more parallel in the video.
July 14, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dan. Yes, there is some slight forearm rotation. You must allow for the face to rotate to reach the proper toe up position. Take a look at Shake Hands Drill and Pencil Tee Drill.
July 14, 2019
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Darryl
Do you still maintain a tight connection between the upper torso and the upper arms during the takeaway and the backswing? Also, what are your thoughts on letting the clubhead trail the turn in the takeaway (float loading)?
May 10, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Darryl. Nothing in RST should be locked, or forced. You will maintain a slight connection and should have awareness that the upper bicep and pectorals still have a connection. But, you shouldn't be pressing in too hard, or it will inhibit elevation (Understanding Arm Elevation Video and 3 Functions of the Right Arm Video). Not a big fan of float loading as it creates a timing issue.
May 11, 2019
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Richard
Hi Craig Thanks for your prompt answer,but I am still confused over how the club travels 90% from address [perpendicular to target line}to parallel to target line while turning 45% from the shoulders and a little hip turn..When I try to get to the end of the take away my hips are turned near 45% which leaves very little ability to turn further and that does not seem correct according to what Chuck says on this and other videos.
May 10, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Richard. Take a look at Body Rotation in Golf Backswing - Chair Drill Video. You will see how much you can rotate without actually moving a lot of your hips. You need to start feeling the core and creating a little separation. Also, Upper vs. Lower Body Video.
May 10, 2019
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Richard
Hi; I am having difficulty getting to shake hands position approx.90% from address by making a 45% shoulder turn and very little hip movement and I feel like I am fully turned 90% when I allow my hips to turn sufficiently to attain the shake hands position;but,on a road show video maybe more than one Chuck tells the student to keep turning all the way to the top of the back swing.Please explain what I am misunderstanding.Is the turn complete at 90% at the end of the takeaway and we just need to complete flexion and elevation to complete the full bs .
May 10, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Richard. The takeaway will have 45 degrees for the shoulders and little hip rotation. The full backswing 90 degrees with the shoulder (flexion, elevation) and roughly 45 degrees with the hips. In the takeaway, you will have just a little forearm rotation, elevation and wrist set. Take a look at the Pencil Tee Drill.
May 10, 2019
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Michael
It is so much easier rotate fully using the arms crossed drill. When you add a club, or film my swing when hitting a shot my turn is roughly half of the drill, mainly it seems through tension in the upper arms and shoulders because of the weight of the club. What is the solution?
February 4, 2019
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Dean
Hey Michael, it is easier without the club and weight changes everything. The brain takes time to learn these new movements. That's why RST has you do it without the club to get the body moves down first. The solution is stacking it with the 5 Step System. For example, if you can't do it with just the lead arm (Step 3) without the club, then your chances of doing it with a club consistently are poor at best. Obviously you want to keep the arms and shoulders as tension free as possible or they will fire first. Use just enough to be able to rotate/elevate the arms and have about 25% of your wrist set completed when the takeaway is complete. Pencil Drill video is an excellent way to get feedback for dialing that in.
February 5, 2019
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James
I have a tendency to slightly flex the back of my right hand in the initial move takeaway. Is there one particular thing that triggers that initial move? Shifting weight to the right, feeling the right oblique lead the way, turn the right shoulder, turn the right hip? I have tried different things to try and stop that slight initial handsy movement. I keep my right arm straight to hip high but that little handsy back flexion of the right hand spoils it.
January 28, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. Take a look at the 5 Minutes to Master Rotation. I have found feeling the core/obliques move very helpful to cure this issue. Also, starting with a little bit of weight will help ease tension with momentum. My Golf Backswing Secrets Video.
January 28, 2019
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James
Thanks for the advice Craig but cannot find the video you spoke of at the end, My Golf Backswing Secrets Video. I put that in the search box and nothing like it came up, can you help?
January 29, 2019
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Dean
Type it in without using the word "video" and viola! "My Golf Backswing Secrets" only. Cheers.
January 29, 2019
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James
Thank you Dean. I am a numnut at times!
January 29, 2019
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Ronan
Hi, Is the club too much on the inside on that takeaway? Ronan
January 27, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ronan. It doesn't look too much inside from what I can tell.
January 27, 2019
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Zubair
Hi Craig This is about the takeaway. When properly done what should be the position of the club in relation to the feet. should it be parallel to a line drawn in front of the toes, along the toes or along balls of the feet.
January 25, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Zubair. Roughly along the toe line.
January 25, 2019
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Ronan
Hi is there a video explaining what to do/think/feel from the end of the takeaway to the complete backswing?
January 19, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ronan. 5 Minutes to the Perfect Backswing, 4 Square Drill, Completing the Golf Backswing and Winter Golf Training Program - Backswing.
January 19, 2019
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Aaron
Hi, I would like to ask a question about the take away. When I use my body only to rotate back and take the club back using no input at from the arms, I will find the club a few degrees closed. I really try and test this over and over and using only body without any input from the arms whatsoever there will be a few degrees of closed as Chuck says will create problems. It appears to me that at least for me in order to get the club directly square up and toe up requires some pronation of the left arm and supination of the right arm. When I watch video closely it still also appears that Chuck is using some pronation and supination as well. Def not just REF. I would to not do any pronation and supination if possible as it feel very complex to me. Maybe I should submit a swing analysis on this one ? Would like to hear the thoughts of the school. Thanks
December 14, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Aaron. REF is the acronym for the entire backswing. The takeaway will have minor wrist set, forearm rotation and elevation. Albeit very small amounts. Take a look at the Bucket Drill, Forearm Rotation in Golf Swing for Power, and the Shake Hands Drill. We would always welcome a swing review. Happy to provide suggestions.
December 14, 2018
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Billy
What’s a good drill to combine steps 1 -3?
September 11, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Billy. Are you referring to the 5 Step System (1-3), or hinging, rotation and elevation for the takeaway?
September 12, 2018
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Billy
Sorry. 5-step system.
September 12, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Billy. By combine do you mean with a club, or something specific? Step 3 combines proper body and arm motion. The move is pretty much complete. Is there a certain area of the move you are struggling with?
September 12, 2018
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Billy
I would like to combine the 5 minutes to perfect weight shift, rotation, and adding lead arm altogether in one drill with a golf club.
September 12, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Billy. Step 4 - Add the Club will combine all the above into one motion. If you are looking for solely a backswing and/or downswing version. Take a look at the Winter Golf Training Program Backswing and Downswing.
September 12, 2018
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David
When I use the drill of shoving the club into my belly button to make sure I’m not pushing from the left side, I do that without pushing but the club comes way off my belly when i complete the take away. It is more like 6 inches from my belly not an inch or two as chuck mentions in this video. So not pushing but wider I guess. Is that a problem to have the club come off the belly that far,ie is that an indication something else is wrong?
September 4, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello David. Sounds like you may be adding too much elevation. I would check your hand position when completed that they are inline with your trail pocket (RST Pencil Tee Drill).
September 4, 2018
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David
So how or where does the width in the take away/ back swing come from if your hands do not move away from your belly button during the take away, for the wide/narrow/wide swing chuck speaks of? I can do all the drills in the pencil tee video with my hands the same distance from my belly at set up, and just turn. Or I can do them all with my hands moving farther from my belly as I progress in the take away. At completion of the take away everything in the pencil drill is the same just my shoulders are pulled forward by pushing my hands away from my belly to make a wider take away. So I don’t understand how to get width without your hands moving away from your torso and your shoulders stretching forward versus set up.
September 5, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello David. Their is a slight amount of elevation. That is how the arms stay in front of the sternum. The width is achieved by keeping your trail arm straight. You aren't trying to achieve excessive width by rounding the shoulders and pushing out the arms. Take a look at the Role of the Right Arm Video.
September 5, 2018
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Guy
I’m on level 3 and finished w adding the lead arm. I wonder if I should limit my rounds to complete the whole 5 steps or not play at all. I’m am about ready to start 9-3 drill w the connect too. I have 100 reps w connect using arms and no club. What do you think.
August 16, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Guy. Ideally, playing would be limited during the rebuild and slowly adding range--course back into the mix once you have ultimate control of the lead side. Biggest problem I usually see is players jump too fast onto the course. Playing 54 holes and undoing a lot of good.
August 16, 2018
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Eric
Is the slight elevation gradually starting from the beginning of the rotation or as you finish the takeaway?
August 8, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Eric. Elevation will slightly begin after the takeaway has started.
August 8, 2018
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Jeffery
So that's what the obliques feel like! Just wondering, it looks like the arms are turning just a little (from my advantage as a right handed - clockwise) to get the club face perpendicular to the ground. Am I seeing that correctly?
August 1, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jeffrey. The forearms will have a slight rotation to get the club toe up. Bucket Drill and Shake Hands Drill.
August 1, 2018
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Eric
Two questions. 1. So, there should be some conscious thought to elevating arms and hands? At one point in he video he said don’t move arms and hands? 2. I taught myself to play golf by reading Ben Hogan’s Moden Fundamentals. He had both elbow pits pointing up. I’ve read now that is correct for the right arm, but the left should be pointing down the target. There is talk about the arms hanging “naturally”. Should I be making an adjustment to get the left elbow pointing down the target and the right elbow pit facing away or just let then hag naturally (with good posture - no rounded shoulders)?
July 31, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Eric. The trail elbow pit will face away as will the lead arm pit. You don't want the lead elbow pointing down the target line, nor as externally rotated as Hogan described. Facing away and not locked out (Golf Grip Checkpoint Tips and Gorilla Grip Video). The arms/hands do relatively little in the takeaway. But, you have to add a slight amount of elevation if you tend to swing inside (4 Square Drill and Pool Noodle Drill).
July 31, 2018
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Gary
Very helpful! Q: but am I missing something, the club does not seem then to go back that far when the shoulders turn 45 degrees? Gary in San Diego.
July 12, 2018
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Gary
The right arm backswing Drill appears to answer my Q.
July 12, 2018
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Gary
Or should I say resolve the issue.
July 12, 2018
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Patrick
Craig, At 60 years of age, and having spent a lot of money on lessons, I am flabbergasted at how wrong the vast majority of teaching professionals are in their teaching methods. I was always taught to start my takeaway with pushing with my left arm. This forced me to push my arms across my chest. Now after over three years out, with injuries, this habit is screwing up my swing. I'm hitting the ball left, right, and topping it all during the first 7 holes. Its a disaster! Your teaching methods make complete sense, and now everything is clear about why I was so inconsistent with ball striking, direction, distance, and contact, all because I fell back into 'old habits' even though I'd worked on my rotary swing set-up. I am now looking forward with confidence to practicing the takeaway drills, and fixing things. Thank You, you are a top guy! Patrick
June 25, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Patrick. Very humbled by your post and thank you very much. All of us here at RST look forward to seeing your new found results with proper work on the correct fundamentals of the golf swing.
June 25, 2018
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Marc
Hi Craig, would you say that the first move should be the rotation which is immediately followed by the weight shift or loading of the right leg. I tend to do the reverse (it is all extremely marginal) i.e. small weight to the right followed by rotation but as a result I sometimes find that my right hand is pulling my left shoulder down during the takeaway. I have the impression that I can rotate the right shoulder and feel that the left shoulder or the left arm is just hanging loosely I get into a much better position knowing that the pulling of the left shoulder down is creating all sort of problems. Best, Marc
June 10, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Marc. We prefer your method of shifting to initiate and then pulling back with the trail shoulder. If you are concerned that the sequence is affecting your rotation of your shoulders. Work on the Golf Backswing Shoulder Plane Drill.
June 10, 2018
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Jack
This video alone, if followed correctly, would vastly improve most amateur golf swings. I'm committed to this program and anxious to get to the point of hitting balls. Excellent information and the videos are very well done.
May 16, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jack. Much appreciative of the post. Looking forward to your new revamped swing. If we can help along the way. Please keep us informed.
May 16, 2018
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Jack
I have a message for you for someone you know. Wear your sunscreen.
May 16, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jack. Everyone I know needs to wear more sunscreen .
May 16, 2018
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Greg
Hi Craig, Just confirming - when griping the club at setup the back of the right wrist forms a straight line with the back of the arm and that relationship is maintained during the takeaway..... THanks, Greg
February 11, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Greg. Yes, you don't want to hinge the trail wrist back during the takeaway. Take a look at Golf Grip Checkpoint Tips for help with trail arm placement and Right Wrist in the Takeaway about maintaining the relationship.
February 11, 2018
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Hector
I can't feel the shoulder blade in the takeway, any help? I usually push my hands outside in the takeway , and the club goes outside the toe line. Should the hands and wrist should move in the takaway in the toe line ? I have the mirror and in the takeway I can't see my right shoulder in the back, for some reason I protract my right shoulder.... Any suggestion ?
January 16, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Hector. The hands and club will be roughly inline with the toe line. You are rotating back as the hands work up. Rotation taking care of depth and elevation keeping the arms in front with slight lift. If you perform the 2 inch hand drill in the Role of the Right Arm Video (maintaining 2 inch gap and finger tip length to a thumbs up position) it will force you to have to rotate.
January 17, 2018
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Mark
Chuck- Played a round of golf today for the first time in 4 weeks. I am 3 weeks into the program, have 1000+ reps in the set up and the rotation drills, and almost 1000 in the takeaway drill. I didn't have high expectations since I am pretty much changing my whole swing. But, I was very pleasantly surprised. I focused on my new posture, the takeaway and trying to do the weight shift. And, surprisingly enough I hit about 2/3 of my shots really well - and MUCH better than usual. I am excited to continue the reps and the lessons and look forward to continued improvement. I really think that the weeks/months of reps focused on small movements that build on one another are going to make a difference!! I am psyched!
January 15, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Mark. Fantastic. Love hearing the good news. If you stay committed to making the swing change. Even better golf to come.
January 16, 2018
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William
Chuck, I am a psychologist (Ph.D.). Just a suggestion..you need to edit your videos to cut out all the extra talk. In this video, you take over 4 minutes to say that you should not flip your writes at the takeaway. Hope this helps.
November 18, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello William. Thanks for the post and added thoughts to make the video better.
November 18, 2017
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Spencer
Hey Working my way through the RST program just realised that watching this video i have been moving my right hip to much when rotating so back to step 2 for me On the take away does the right arm have a little bit of flex At address my right arm has a small amount of flex which stays there when i do the take away or should it straighten when i do the takeaway Thanks Spence
November 3, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Spencer. The goal is to maintain a straight trail arm. If you already have some flex. Take a look at Right Elbow Pit Video.
November 6, 2017
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Ardell
I mastered the shark fin drill for the one piece takeaway; then I put a club back in my hand and had an Ah Ha moment! It appears by rotating my core correctly to start the golf swing my shoulder/arm elevation is happening naturally without me having to consciously think about it. Should this be the case? Thanks in advance for answering my question.
July 7, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ardell. Yes, some players already add slight elevation while rotating. Others have to consciously train it.
July 8, 2017
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Steve
Hi, had a swing review from Craig, got a tick for rotation so have moved to Takeaway, feel i am doing OK getting to the desired end position. Will keep doing the Reps until my next review. Should I be hitting balls from this position?
June 24, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Steve. You may hit balls from the takeaway position (9 to 3 Golf Swing Drill Video).
July 8, 2017
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shulei
1.What s the first movement for golf swing?weight shift to right or turn ? 2.how much defree hip should turn when take away finish?
June 13, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Shulei. You may use weight transfer or rotation. Some players need a trigger over the ball. Therefore, start to shift to get momentum going. But, starting with rotation is perfectly fine. Shoulders will turn roughly 45 degrees and hips will be minimal.
June 13, 2017
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shulei
How much hip turn during take away.can't stop hip turn and worry turn too much.how to check this
June 11, 2017
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Micah (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Shulei, a suggestion is to not worry too much about how much hip turn you have, but to focus on shoulder blade glide moving in and slightly down toward a still spine. The SB glide will pull the arms - chest - core - and hips (in that order) to there correct positions. If you want to get technical though, the hips should rotate about 15-20 degrees in the back swing.
June 12, 2017
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T David
Spent some time on a rainy day trying to cleanup my takeaway. After watching this video, I think I may be actively using the left leg and hip a bit too much in the takeaway. My question is... Is the left lower let leg and hip passive at the start of the takeaway, and increased force and weight to the left more of a reaction (rather than an intentional movement) from the rotation of the shoulder blade slide? I am thinking that is where I may be getting into trouble at the top of the swing with a straight right knee. Thoughts?
June 5, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dave. The lead leg/knee should be fairly passive at the start of the takeaway. The weight shouldn't be going back to the lead leg due to the shoulder pull back though.
June 5, 2017
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T David
Craig - Oh sorry, I stated that backwards... (my brain got scrambled there). I meant to say... Is the right leg and hip passive at the start of the takeaway, and increased force and weight to the right more of a reaction (rather than an intentional movement) from the rotation of the shoulder blade slide?
June 5, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dave. The trail shoulder will start to pull on the hip adding rotation. It won't force you to shift the weight though. Some players have to actively train shifting while others already perform the move naturally due to an existing motor pattern.
June 5, 2017
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Corey
Thanks. Played my first round of golf today since starting with rotary swing and I can see now why you say it's best to avoid playing while trying to change your swing. I shouldn't even be hitting full swings at the moment let alone playing. Anyway.....today my takeaway on the course was extremely quick and I'm not sure why. I suspect it was my arms were taking over again. Would that sound about right? Extremely quick. I'm going to stay off the course for the next 6 weeks as I don't want to undo my good work. I'm just confused as to why I'm trying to smash the ball starting with a fast takeaway. Tension that comes from hitting a shot that counts for something perhaps?
May 30, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Corey. Apologize for the late response. Somehow this wasn't posted on our system. Sounds about right to me that you started moving the club too much and fast with the hands. It is a natural tendency to move early with the hands. You need to dial it back.
June 5, 2017
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Corey
Is it true to say that it is impossible to move the hands back in the takeaway (no club) and keep them at in the same position relative to each other from setup by moving the arms only. In other words if they are staying the same it means they are being moved by body rotation. Hope that makes sense.
May 28, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Corey. Yes, if they are staying the same it would be because they are driven by the body. Arms only would not be able to replicate that position.
May 29, 2017
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Corey
Whoops. Sorry about the similar comments. They weren't showing up so I kept redoing them. After my last 100 reps I din't feel sore or tight in my lower back but I could feel that my right glute had received a good workout. I took that as a good sign.
May 22, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Corey. Yes, that would be a good sign. No problem for the posts.
May 23, 2017
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Corey
Started doing the 100 reps a day and am getting sweaty by the end of it. When I start I can really feel the muscles in the top of my trail leg as I turn in to it. After about 50 reps I can really feel the muscles in my lower back. Am I doing something wrong to feel those lower back muscles or is that just a result of doing so many reps? I do it in front of the mirror and everything looks correct.
May 21, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Corey. It is more a function of using muscles you haven't used in the takeaway or golf swing before. You are actually working at it now. It should start to lessen the more you repeat a proper pattern.
May 22, 2017
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Corey
I added a comment straight after my first and it the fist disappeared.
May 21, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Corey. I'm sorry. If you repost I will be happy to answer.
May 22, 2017
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Corey
Just to add I don't feel the muscles in my back when I start doing it. Initially i just feel the muscles in my upper right leg but after about 50 I can feel the muscles in my lower back.
May 21, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Corey. The more you perform the drill the tension should subside in the lower back. However, as in the post below make sure you have a good feeling for the shoulder rotation and core not solely a tightened lower back.
May 22, 2017
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Corey
Started doing 100 reps a day for the last couple of days and I'm working up a sweat by the end of it. Feeling the muscles in my lower back and right glute. Is that correct? I'm doing the reps in the mirror and it all looks pretty good.
May 21, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Corey. Make sure you have a sensation for your rotation and torso. I don't want the lower back to be overly tight. You will have some tension, but not enough to make you sore.
May 22, 2017
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Yew Hwan
Thanks Chuck for the detailed explanation.
March 14, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Yew Hwan. Glad you liked the presentation.
March 14, 2017
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sambhu
Great learning system and philosophy. Really helped me. But please reduce videos and repetitive stuff. Thanks again Chuck and team!
February 23, 2017
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Hector
I have been a member of the Rotary swing for 2-3 years already , I have seen all the videos and also I read the book . And believed or not I can't understand what should I feel with the shoulder blade glide . Any help , any Feeling in particular and please don't tell me you should see the video ### . I already had seen all the videos . I am not rotating well so my inconsistent golf game continues . Also I note it that when I have my grip of the left side in strong position and I keep the cupping in the left hand instead in the takeaway only , all the back swing , I can hit the ball better but I can't release the club , it is that the way the takeaway should be ?? To keep the cupping of the left wrist completely in the backswing ??
January 25, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Hector. The lead wrist will gradually lose cupping in the backswing with a finality of a flat lead wrist at the top (Using the Wrist Effectively and Efficiently). I know I have referred all the videos in the past to you and I can't think of another way to relay the feeling. Have you submitted a swing review recently to check with an instructor to see if something is inhibiting the rotation? Also, have you tried swinging a medicine ball?
January 25, 2017
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Brian
Hello during takeaway is their full rotation to 90 degrees or partial. With full rotation pull appears to be behind me instead of in front of chest. Thanks
January 19, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Brian. The shoulders will only rotate 45 degrees in the takeaway.
January 19, 2017
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Brian
Been working on weight shift 1,500 reps and now starting to work on rotation. When should the loading of right glute / weight shift occur. Before or after rotation and elevation. Just trying to determine best way to start swing and eliminate the freeze over the ball. Thanks
January 4, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Brian. Weight shift can be gradual throughout the takeaway, or a trigger to start the takeaway. Some players that have a issue freezing over the ball trigger their takeaway by starting the sequence with weight shift.
January 6, 2017
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Michael
I am 68 years old but fit. I am unable to turn/rotate my chest more than about 30 degrees without rotting my hips. What should I do to make the takeaway as correct as possible with my hands staying in front of my chest. Thank you Michael
December 17, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Michael. Allow for the hip to rotate. Some players due to flexibility will need a little more hip rotation to complete the move. Perfectly acceptable.
December 18, 2016
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Curt
I'm struggling with incorporating the weight shift to my right side during takeaway. I have a tendency to start moving my body sideways when I make that shift. Are there any tips and/or video that address this initial step in the takeaway?
November 6, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Curt. Take a look at the Weight Shift Video Part 2 or the Golf Takeaway Overview Video.
November 7, 2016
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T David
It appears that Chuck advocates no wrist hinge at the A2 position, Wouldn't this cause the club shaft to lag. In one of my other questions about this, it was stated that there would be about 25% of wrist hinge at that point, I'm a bit cinfused on this point, if you could clarify please.
November 3, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dave. The wrist hinge is gradual in the takeaway reaching about 25% upon completion. Take a look around 22-24 mins in this video.
November 3, 2016
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T David
Perfect. Thanks. Craig.
November 3, 2016
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Michael
Does weight shift come before shoulder turn?
October 31, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Michael. Some players use their weight shift to initiate the takeaway. It helps with not getting stuck over the ball. Others like to blend rotation and shift the weight during the move.
October 31, 2016
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sambhu
Guys.. By keeping my right forearm straight And moving my arms as one piece, I am able to get a full turn. My straight arm is acting like a lever pushing my right shoulder back .. I find this to really help my driver and fairway woods as well. Is this acceptable in rst?
October 6, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Sambhu. There is a little rotation in the trail arm, but using a straight trail arm like a piston to push the trail shoulder back is the correct feeling.
October 7, 2016
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Ian
There is on area of the takeaway that I am not clear on. That is the position of the right arm from the shoulder to the elbow at the top of the backswing. It can be anything from the top of the arm being horizontal to the ground to the elbow pointing down to the ground with the top of the arm close to the chest. Even when maintaining shoulder elevation. Some even advocate putting a head cover under the right armpit. Can you clarify please. Ian
October 6, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ian. Putting a head cover under the trail arm would inhibit proper elevation. The trail arm shouldn't be glued to the chest and with the elbow pointing down. Take a look at the 3 Functions of the Right Arm.
October 7, 2016
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Francis
I am confused as to what the right arm should do during the takeaway. In the video, Chuck mentioned that the right arm should be kept straight during the takeaway (rotation). However, I found it hard to keep my right arm straight and I needed to bend my right arm slightly. What should the right arm do during the body rotation and just before flexion?
September 12, 2016
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Francis, the right arm should be doing very little in the takeaway. It should be staying as straight as possible (relaxed) and rotating and slightly elevating along the way. If you are seeing some flexion in the takeaway, then you are more than likely pushing the club back too hard with the lead side or not allowing the wrist and forearm to rotate. Hope that helps. - Chris Tyler
September 12, 2016
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Taylor
What about the flexion of the right arm forming ninety degrees, the video didn't cover that or any drills? '
August 9, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Taylor. This video is for the takeaway. You don't want to add any flexion in the trail arm. The trail arm will fold after the takeaway is completed. 3 Functions of the Right Arm, 5 Mins to the Perfect Backswing, and Completing the Golf Backswing Video.
August 10, 2016
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Ole
if you only rotate your body around 45 degrees in the takaway, how is it possible that the iron is facing down the target line ? there must be some internal rotation of the arms in the takeaway (pronation and supination af the arms).. why does Chuck not mention this in the video .. "5 minutes ti the perfect golf takeaway" ? Kind regards Ole ... love the program.. but its really hard work to get a new and perfect golfswing
August 8, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ole. There is some rotation in the forearms in the takeaway. Not a lot, but enough to allow the face to rotate. The blend of the forearm rotation (Bucket Drill) and elevation (Understanding Shoulder Elevation) is why the club will end up down the intended target line.
August 8, 2016
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Ole
I think it should be in the video ("5 minutes to the perfect golf takeaway"),that you pronate your left arm and supinate your right arm a litle bit.... when you stand working on the takeaway drill and you can`t get it right like Chuck... then you begin to ask if you just met one more Coach, who is not able to give you the whole picture ........ this is just constructive criticism Kind regards Ole
August 9, 2016
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Christopher
There is no mention of having access tilt at setup when performing the drills. Why is that.
August 2, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Christopher. Prerequisite of this drill is 5 Minutes to the Perfect Setup. You should already have it .
August 2, 2016
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John
Hello, Weight shift has always been something I struggled with. My "key" to initiate my golf swing has been to raise my right heel slightly and plant it. This mini move I developed was a way of ensuring a weight shift as well as to not sway. Is this a problem and should I try to to eliminate it from thr new RST routines I am trying to learn an ingrain. Thank You
July 22, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello John. Are you a right handed player or left? If you are right handed you definitely can use the little stomp or shift to help trigger the start of the backswing.
July 22, 2016
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John
I am confused with the fact that the shoulder turn will be about 45 degrees and with the arms out in front, how is it that at the completion of the takeaway the arms and club are straight down the line. Wouldn't the arms and club be 45 degrees in front of down the line? Or is the fact that the lead arm is already 45 degrees in front of the body at address and a 45 degree turns makes them the total of 90 degrees and thus paralel with DTL?
June 26, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello John. The key is shoulder elevation. As you rotate the arms will move vertically to help them remain in front of the sternum. This will give the appearance of the club being down the target line. Take a look at Understanding Shoulder Elevation.
June 27, 2016
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Samuel
G'day, I've recently become a full member and I'm working my way through all these amazing videos.....all of them SO helpful. I was hoping you could direct me to the 9-3 drill I've heard mentioned in the above video. (I think it was the one above?) Thanks heaps guys.
June 24, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Samuel. Welcome to the site. Great to have you! 9 to 3 is in the Downswing Section or use the search bar at the top right of this page.
June 25, 2016
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Russel
Hi Craig, I am struggling to get my takeaway on plane. Im not sweeping the club inside. However, the butt end of the club is above the shaft line angle while the club head falls below it. I eventually get my hands in line with the club half way through. Am I just not cocking my wrists enough? or rotating my wrists? I have tried elevating my shoulders more as I rotate but it still does not swing back parallel to that initial shaft line at address like your takeaway does.
May 26, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Russel. It sounds like lack of wrist set. The takeaway is a blend of rotation, elevation, and wrist set. Take a look at the Using the Wrist Effectively and Efficiently Video to help. Also, about 22-23 minutes into the video above.
May 26, 2016
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Russel
Hi Craig, thanks for the help. I have been using the self swing analysis and noticed that you have some separation of your left arm during the takeaway from the DTL view during your takeaway. If I dont have that separation does that mean I am not elevating my shoulders enough? I think I am just going to have to send in a swing analysis
May 30, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Russel. A swing analysis would be best. If you need help. Please let us know. You can use practically any device to film. The lead arm shouldn't come across, nor be pressing against the lead pectoral in the takeaway. It could be a little lack of elevation or lead arm push. Take a look at the Understanding Shoulder Elevation Video.
May 30, 2016
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James
When i use a club the momentum makes it feel like my left side is pushing, should i feel like i'm taking all momentum out of the backswing?
March 30, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. You don't want the club swinging the body around. You can feel a little momentum with the shift. But, the majority of the awareness should be the big muscles to move the club.
March 31, 2016
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michael
Drills is great BUT-------totally unrelated- except i cant access w/o this answer.... i can login w/o any issue on my Surface & my desk top PC- BUT, big But- can't login ... yes i am using the correct email & Pword... on my Iphone 6. anyone else have this issue.... what adjustments to i make ion my settings on my Iphone?
March 20, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Michael. I contacted Customer Support for you. You should be hearing from them shortly.
March 21, 2016
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Adrian
Is their a trigger to start the takeaway recommended? Forward press , kick in right knee weight shift or another trigger?
February 28, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Adrian. Feel free to start loading the trail glute early to trigger the backswing.
February 29, 2016
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Loran
Then, there are several segments in the takeaway, and more so up into the backswing? These movements blend together continuously? First segment of the end of the takeaway is knee-height, then next segment comes pocket level, then elevates up to belt-buckle height? Next segment elevation belongs to the backswing area? How important is the wrist cock in the takeaway? Is it a gradual tendency and where in the takeaway does the wrist cock reach its potential height?
February 22, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Loan. The takeaway needs to have a blend of rotation, slight elevation and slight wrist set/cock. If you don't add any elevation the arms will tend to move too horizontally and move across the chest. Thus making it harder to stay in front of the sternum (Understanding Shoulder Elevation Video and 4 Square Drill). You need a little wrist set to get the club moving vertically and support the club (this video, Using the Wrist Effectively and Efficiently, Perfecting Impact Part 4). When all is said and done the hands should be inline with the trail pocket and the club parallel to the ground.
February 22, 2016
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Roger
So I assume the benefit of having the toe up in the position when the club is at parallel is to allow the wrists to properly cock versus having the club shut so that it is parallel to the spine angle? Feels like a much easier way to transition into the backswing.
February 7, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Roger. Yes, it does allow for a better wrist set or vertical motion in the backswing. Also, you aren't fighting the physics of the club. The club will always be rotating. For better speed in the swing you don't want to fight the club head's rotation. Take a look at Forearm Rotation in the Golf Swing in this section.
February 7, 2016
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Bob
Hi Steven, question; when practicing rotation, elevation, flexion, rotation how much tension (pressure) should there be against chest from inside part of left & right arms?
January 26, 2016
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Steven (Certified RST Instructor)
HI Bob- As for pressure of the arm on the chest they will be just resting on top of the pec muscles at setup and into the takeaway. Make sure that the left bicep/arm doesn't get pinned against the left chest muscles in the takeaway because that can lead to other issues. Otherwise very light pressure
January 26, 2016
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Bob
Thank you for the quick reply. I'm practicing daily and finally making some progress Bob.
January 26, 2016
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James
What is the easiest way to evaluate the takeaway using video? Where should the club & hands be in relation to the "elbow plane line"?
January 22, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey James. Take a look at the RST Pencil Tee Drill. The goal (45 degrees of shoulder turn, hands inline with trail pocket, club parallel to ground with a little wrist set, weight shift into trail glute, and the trail arm straight). Elbow plane line probably isn't the best way to gauge. Look for proper body positions.
January 22, 2016
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AC
You mentioned that you rotate on an inclined plane. Does this mean your left shoulder should be slightly lower than your right as you rotate back?
December 10, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello AC. You are rotating around the spine. The left shoulder will be slightly below the right due to the forward hinge from the hips. You don't want to try and push the left shoulder down though. In actuality it will probably feel more leveled off.
December 10, 2015
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Kyle
Hello Craig! New member here, I wanted to follow up on AC's question and make sure I understand correctly because I feel I may have the same issue. So when I am in my setup position and shift my hips left to create axis tilt i feel that my left shoulder dips down as I begin my takeaway and I think my body is doing it because I feel that if I rotate and pull my left shoulder blade toward my spine that it is the natural position. So you are saying that as I shift right to engage my right glute from a tilted axis and begin my takeaway with the pulling of the right shoulder blade that my shoulder will be leveled off or parallel roughly to the ground?
December 22, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Kyle. Welcome to the site. Happy to have you. As you pull from the trail shoulder blade you will start to create rotation. The lead shoulder will still work down a little as you are rotating around the spine from a bent over position. It will feel more level to you, than in actuality. But, the lead will work down somewhat as the trail shoulder pulls you back. Take a look at the Golf Body Rotation Video. Perform the drill from a hinged position at setup. Hopefully, it will shed some light on the situation.
December 22, 2015
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Chris
I'm having difficulties executing a proper takeaway. My latest review showed that my takeaway is messing up my backswing; top flat and hands too deep behind me. I have been working on the rotation and takeaway drills for a long time and while I seem to execute the drills well without a golfclub, once I take the club in my hands and perform the takeaway, I immediately roll my left forearm, disconnect my left bicep from my pecs and send the club to the inside. When I do not grond the club behind the ball but let it hover just slightly above the ground, I seem not to have these problems (when watching in a mirror). Would you recommend not grounding the club behind the ball at adress or does this give other problems? Thanks!
December 8, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Chris. Every player has a preference on whether to ground the club or not. I used to "hover" and now I ground the club. The "hover" sometimes can lead to swinging the weight of the club head and using solely club momentum versus body. You need to stop trying to move or place the club in the proper positioning. Take care of the body position to move the club. Take a look at the One Simple Takeaway Fix and Pencil Tee Drill to help with the throw inside. Start with slow reps in front of a ball. Move the body to move the club, not vice versa.
December 9, 2015
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Jeffrey
Do any RST takeaway and/or downswing videos or articles speak to "extensor action" in the golfswing? I do not recall reading or seeing anything about it. Is extensor action viewed as a fundamental or at least important part of the RST Golfswing?
November 16, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jeffrey. There aren't any specific videos on the site that deal with extensor action. We do focus on keeping the trail arm straight. But, you aren't forcing it straight by using the lead arm or activating certain pressure points. The proper motion of the trail arm allows the lead arm to rotate and maintain width.
November 17, 2015
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Djamil
Hi, I have 2 questions : At the end of the takeaway the club is parallel to the ground and pointing up. For me the club is more up than parallel (is it a problem?) and sometimes the club face is open (what is the difference if it's open and not square at the end of the takeaway). When i finish my takeaway it seems to me i can't turn lot more my shoulder unless i use a lot my hips. Is it possible to use more my hips , i don't know what to do... Thank you and Sorry for my english Djam
October 31, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Meran. The hips will turn roughly 45 degrees from the takeaway to the top of the backswing. You might be over rating early. Ideally, you want the club toe up and the club parallel to the ground. Take a look at the Forearm Rotation in the Golf Swing Video, RST Pencil Tee Drill, and the Using the Wrist Effectively and Efficiently Video.
October 31, 2015
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Djamil
hello Craig, Sorry i am not sure to understand " You might be over rating early" does it mean i can turn my hips earlier or more than 45°? Sorry i am french it i don't understand everything in english... Djamil
November 1, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hell Meran. I apologize. For some reason spell check exchanged the word. You might be over rotating early. The goal is minimal hip turn and 45 degrees of shoulder turn in the takeaway. From there 45 degrees of hip turn and 90 in the shoulders. If you need to turn the hips more than 45 to the top you can certainly do that, but you don't want to go too much for torque purposes.
November 1, 2015
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Carole
I am struggling with the takeaway, have been trying to do this correctly for 9 months and still not doing it right. After watching this video many times I am confused. If you rotate your torso 45 degrees and keep your arms in the same relative position as at address, and keep your wrists neutral, and the club shaft still points at your belly button (as described in the exercise that has you grip way down with the butt of the club in your belly button), then when the takeaway is complete (club parallel to the ground), it appears that the club shaft is pointing down the target line. That means that it is no longer pointing at your body. So my question is: where should the club shaft be pointing and if it's down the target line, what caused this to happen because Chuck only talks about torso rotation and elevation which would leave you with a club that is at 45 degrees to the line...not parallel to the line.
October 19, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Carole. The little bit of elevation, wrist set, and forearm rotation is what gets the club pointing down the target line when parallel to the ground. In Understanding Shoulder Elevation Al talks about this. Also, in the 4 Square Drill Chuck talks about it. Have you uploaded a drill or swing to one of our instructors yet to help find the culprit?
October 19, 2015
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Carole
Thanks for the quick response, Craig. Yes, I've been submitting videos since February..not all on takeaway, and we've tried several things but my problems persist. The latest suggestion was not enough torso rotation even though I didn't think that was a problem, but it was certainly an excellent and correct observation. I've struggled with my wrists/hands trying to use them correctly and have watched all the videos on wrists. I think I may be dealing with club momentum pulling my hands into a hinged/bowed position, but I need to try the rotation correction first. Just wanted to verify the hand/arm movements as I practice the better rotation moves. Thanks for the pointers on where to look. I love the site and have made a lot of good changes. All of the video analyses from my instructor have been right on and I appreciate all the help.
October 19, 2015
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Matthew
Is it normal for those new to the site to experience soreness of the thoracic spine when first starting out? All the focus on rotation must take some time to get used to - I'm just wondering if it's a symptom of putting too much weight to the right side in takeaway/backswing? Thanks again, great stuff.
October 14, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Matthew. I wouldn't think it would be over doing weight transfer in the backswing. However, soreness definitely can be expected. Most players don't rotate properly because it creates a little tension and engages big muscles. If you take a look at the Move 1 Video or Pushing from the Left Side Video. You can see it doesn't take a whole lot of muscular effort to just swing the arms. You are engaging bigger and more muscle groups now.
October 14, 2015
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Matthew
Thx.
October 14, 2015
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Lance
Is the wrist cock a conscious movement? From take away to end of backswing will wrist cock be automatic if shoulder blade glide, weight shift, elevation, and flexion are done properly? For 9 to 3 drill should I eliminate elevation and flexion and go directly to 100% wrist cock on purpose?
October 5, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Lance. You will want to gradually make sure the wrist set to the top. Using the Wrist Effectively and Efficiently Video. The 9 to 3 will have a little bit of wrist set. No need to add a bunch more of flexion and elevation. The wrist angle will just help with having some lag coming down.
October 5, 2015
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chad
Can you describe how much tension/tightness you feel in the ab area when taking the club away with your core instead of whipping the left arm across the chest? When I am trying to turn more doing the drills, I feel way more use of my abs than normal. I assume this is good, but want to be sure I am on the right track.
September 16, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Chad. You should definitely feel more core. A lot of RST Newbies feel more muscle recruitment rather than the old arms takeaway.
September 16, 2015
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nathan
Just to clarify: The chest rotates 45 degree with no arm elevation because that will send the club to the outside of the target line. After 45 degrees there is shoulder elevation to keep the club from going too low and inside. All the while having right elbow pit facing away from the body?
September 5, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Nathan. There is 45 degrees of shoulder rotation in the takeaway. There is also a touch of elevation to help keep the arms/hands in-front. 4 Square Drill Video, Pool Noodle Video, Understanding Shoulder Elevation Video and RST Pencil Tee Drill. After the 45 degrees of rotation there will be some additional elevation. Yes, the trail elbow pit will be facing away.
September 5, 2015
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Paul
My big miss was slicing but now it is hitting start left and saying the ball does coming over top cause this. I've been trying to get video from iPhone to Apple computer with no success.
September 3, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Paul. (For Right Handed). Yes, coming over the top with a shut face can cause left-left shots. Take a look at Stop Coming Over the Top and the Over the Top Stick Drill.
September 3, 2015
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Loran
The takeaway is both a combination of rotation and elevation, correct? My shoulders should turn around more than any other body parts, like the abs, glutes, or quads?
August 25, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Loan. The takeaway is a blend of rotation and elevation (4 Square Drill). The shoulders will turn approximately 45 degrees. They will be the origin of movement to pull back the club.
August 26, 2015
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randal
Thx you guys are great and really responsive to your clients !!
August 17, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Randal. No problem. Thanks for the compliments.
August 17, 2015
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randal
Does this movement create the so called "x factor" ie the differential in coil between the trunk and the hips that provides the rotational component of power in the swing? Other sources of power being the release and right arm ?
August 16, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Randall. You will start to build torque "x factor" in the takeaway. The separation could get a little bigger to the top, but the vast majority will be from the beginning. 45 Degrees of shoulder rotation and minimal hip rotation. Your power sources will be your rotation, leverage and width. The coil will help you store power for rotational power and the leverage/width will be the lag and release.
August 17, 2015
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Howard
I've been working on my takeaway using the drills in this video and I can do it perfectly when I'm not hitting a ball but when I put a ball down I can't. If I continue doing the drills will it eventually work when I'm hitting a ball? Or do you have any other ideas?
July 31, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Howard. Yes. After a certain amount of reps your brain will know no other way to perform the move. However, when the ball gets in front of you. Don't focus on the ball, the strike, or the result. Keep the focus solely on the body movements.
August 1, 2015
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Howard
Thanks Craig...I'll keep pressing on.
August 1, 2015
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Jared
Hello, I've gotten much help from this site and got to a 7 handicap but have been really struggling with the club getting flat on the backswing and getting stuck. I rewatched this video and see how Chuck says the arms ONLY go up and down, which was something I definitely don't do. I have a good torso takeaway but as I get to the top I tend to let my hands pass my sternum. Changing this will be tough but I can see the results already. Do the arms cross at all or is it truly up and down? And what about in the chipping or pitching motion? I tried it today on the short game and had some good results but I don't want to go down the wrong rabbit hole. Thank you and sorry for the long winded question!
July 8, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jared. The hands will cross center line a bit as you fold the trail arm from the takeaway to the top of the back swing. Chipping and pitching shouldn't be crossing center line. You really don't need to manually force the cross. It's only because of a little fold in the trail arm. Happy to hear you've improved. Lets keep it going! The 4Square Drill in the Advanced Takeaway Section would probably be a good one for you to watch.
July 9, 2015
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Matt
Would bowing my left wrist on the takeaway contribute to my inability to get vertical hinge vs getting flat and hinging more horizontal? I am in s good position at the end of the takeaway but after that my club get deep behind me and then at the top I am in a decent position...
July 6, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Matt. Typically, bowing the lead wrist will get the club working inside and not allow for proper vertical set.
July 6, 2015
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Matt
Wow this might be the AHA moment I have been searching for since I started years ago. I was always told I needed more vertical hinge and could not figure out why I couldn't produce this. Any drills to maintain the angle at address, as my issue is when I start takeaway it basically flattens out
July 6, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Matt. One Simple Takeaway Fix and Pencil Tee Drill in the Advanced Takeaway Section.
July 6, 2015
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Jared
It is stated to keep the arms in front of the chest on the takeway. However, it says you rotate your torso 45 degrees on the takeway. When your club is parallel at the end of the takeaway, the hands have rotated 90 degrees. So should the arms still be behind the sturnum when viewed down the line, and not directly in front? Thanks
June 17, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jared. With adding elevation the club won't be pointing directly at the sternum. Take a look at Understanding Shoulder Elevation Video in the Backswing Section.
June 17, 2015
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Loran
How much more do you rotate your shoulders when you finish your takeaway and commence the backswing? I am sure the end of the takeaway is not enough torque to generate massive power.
June 2, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Loan. The shoulders will turn another 45 degrees from the takeaway to the completed backswing position.
June 2, 2015
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Brent
As you start the turn with your shoulders at what point do you start to elevate your arms?
May 30, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Brent. There is gradual elevation in the takeaway. You will more than likely feel you start with rotation as you slowly add elevation. Take a look at the Understanding Shoulder Elevation and 4 Square Drill Video in the Backswing Section.
May 30, 2015
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Chuck
When going through the videos for the first time should I stop when I come to the advanced techniques until I have mastered the previous movements?
May 20, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Chuck. Sometimes in the advanced sections there are tips that tackle specific problems. Example: Takeaway Advanced Section - Role of the Right Arm. This video helps players with very dominant trail arm elbow bend.
May 21, 2015
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Chuck
May 20, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Chuck. I responded above.
May 21, 2015
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Jackie (Certified RST Instructor)
I have achieved over 5,000 reps doing this program, and I cannot deny that there is a dramatic improvement towards RST from when I started. However, it is not perfect, and I still struggle to keep the ball in play under pressure. Is it true that for some students, it takes a lot more reps then the RST philosophy of 3000-5000 reps? Could it be due to the fact that I play once a week? Before every shot I hit out on the golf course, I do my two practice takeaway reps to make sure I do not backtrack.
May 12, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jackie. It takes 3000-5000 perfect reps to ingrain. If you have completed them perfectly, then the new movement pattern should be in place. If you are struggling to keep the ball in play under pressure it might not be all the takeaway's fault. Playing once a week shouldn't inhibit the learning curve. Learning is science, not how much time you spend at the course.
May 12, 2015
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Stewart
It's soul destroying when I hear in the video the takeaway is the easiest part of the golf swing when I have spent hours trying to get it right and I can't do it consistently. I have practiced and practiced the drills without the club. The issue is when I put the club in my hand and start the take away, the weight of the club head wants to flatten the natural wrist cock from set up. I therefore use my left palm to push against the club which in turn seems to engage my left arm muscles and hence I feel I start to push rather than pull. If my left palm doesn't push against the club I feel I start to come inside too early. Any advice welcome.
May 8, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Stewart. The takeaway is easy when you understand how it is properly created. However, un-doing years of training is the tough one. Don't get too frustrated. Every fix starts somewhere. Take a look at the Using the Wrist Efficiently Video in the Introduction Advanced Section. The lead wrist will lose some cupping from setup to the 9 O'clock position. Also, take a look at the Pencil T Drill in this Section Advanced. Try and create the correct takeaway with the club. See if you can feel the difference of what is activating and/or not activating to achieve the proper positioning.
May 8, 2015
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Jackie (Certified RST Instructor)
say I wanted to take the entirety of the day to do about 1,000 reps. Would you recommend going through each movement in the program over and over again until I reached 1,000. For example, there are 110 reps of movements being done in the 5 minutes/day program. Would I just continue to do that program until I reach 1,000 reps? Or just 1,000 reps with the club in my hand? Thanks
April 23, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jackie. A 1000 reps in a day sounds like a whole lot. At some point the brain will get tired and you will lose a little perfection of the move. You can try it, but I think you might find that your perfect reps might start to slide a little. If you own the smaller moves first without a club. By the time you get a club in your hand. You will find that you already own a lot more than you think.
April 23, 2015
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Jackie (Certified RST Instructor)
right I agree completely. I'm just asking based on tracking my reps on paper. 3,000-5,000 is the range to perfect a move. After doing the 5 min/day program would you write down that you did 110 reps?
April 23, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Jackie. Yes, I would.
April 23, 2015
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Greg
Hi RJ, I'm woking on the takeaway and I am having trouble getting the weight into the right heal, any suggestions?
April 16, 2015
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Greg, I like to start my swing with the shift into my right heel, which naturally pulls the club away from the ball about 6 inches so, it acts as a trigger as well. R.J.
April 17, 2015
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Greg
How does the takeaway differ on pitching and chipping from the full swing? Is the backswing on both done with no breakdown of the wrists and the arms moved with the lateral muscles? Does the wrist hinge happen the same way in the pitch as the full swing takeaway? One of Chucks video's mentioned taking the club back square in the short swings because there is not enough time for the rotation of the club face in a small swing. That was with his spinner pitch shot, which involves Dorsi flexion. How about the normal pitch shot that Clay demonstrates?
April 4, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Greg. If you look at the Video Practice Points on both types of shots you are asking about. They describe the amount of set or minimal set required. The Pitch has a quicker set to get the club a little more vertical. The chip the hands will be a little quieter and more hold of the lead wrist through the shot. The pitch wrist set and takeaway wrist set are the same except for earlier in the pitch. The normal pitch shot will have more than usual 25% percent wrist set as in the full swing.
April 5, 2015
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Greg
If you rotate the shoulders 45 degrees without much hip rotation on the takeaway and from there the backswing completion is elevation and right elbow flexion, then is the completion of the 90 degree shoulder turn due to the 45 degree hip rotation? If so, does that mean people who can rotate beyond 45 degrees with minimal hip rotation are the ones who have greater than a 90 degree turn?
April 3, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Greg. The trail shoulder blade and oblique help pull the hips around to 45 degrees. The players that have beyond 90 degrees of rotation actually add lead shoulder push. Take a look at the Left Shoulder Push Video in the Advanced Backswing Section.
April 5, 2015
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Ryan
Just wanted to add something on my experience so far and see if i'm anywhere close to being on point. The drills where the arms are extended are great, and the idea of letting the arms stay where they are at address is good to get the motion down. However, when there is a club in your hands this feeling makes it impossible for me to do the motion. If I really let my hands feel like they aren't moving, the cupping of my left hand gets worse, sort of a reverse hinging motion. I have to push to get the arms to come with the body. Will this feeling go away with time or should I just keep trying to generate this motion with just the body and have my arms feel like they are staying there?
March 27, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Ryan. Don't tense the other muscles too much and get in the way of natural movement. The feeling will be the arms and hands stay there while the big muscles do the work. The majority of players over do the arm movement. Use the Bucket Drill and the Pencil Tee Drill in this section. Understand there is some natural movement (rotation and set) that occur.
March 28, 2015
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Ryan
Gotcha. I'm guessing the remaining movement after the 45 degree shoulder turn is forearm rotation and wrist cock/hinge? Would it be a good idea to move the 45 degrees with the shoulders and then rotate and cock the wrist to get an idea of how much is needed?
March 28, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ryan. I wouldn't separate the motion. Go about it this way. Work on rotation, work on rotation-elevation, blend rotation and elevation, and the blend rotation-elevation-touch of wrist set.
March 29, 2015
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Francis
Does the left arm stay straight (no elbow bend) all the way to top of the takeaway? I can only keep it straight while I'm rotating he shoulders but as soon as I do flexion with the right hand/arm, thd left are bends at the elbow. Is this ok? Many of the pro videos and yours and clay's takeaways show a straight left arm all the way to the top of the takeaway. But one of your clubless swings in this video shows a bent left arm. Could you comment pls? Thanks
March 17, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Francis. Preferably, the left arm shouldn't bend. Its ok for it to be relaxed, but not overly bend too much. There shouldn't be any flexion in the takeaway. Take a look at the RST Pencil Tee Drill in the Advanced Takeaway Section to cover some of the basics. You are probably bending the elbow versus allowing for a little wrist set.
March 17, 2015
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Seth
I must have missed something. If I rotate my torso 45 degrees without moving my arms at all, my club sticks out 45 degrees. In order to get the head of the club "covering the hands" and pointing down the line at takeaway, I'm thinking there needs to be some type of forearm rotation and hand cocking. If I only rotate 45 degrees and do a slight wrist cock, the club head is way above the swing plane. I'm confused as to if the arms do not move or if they actually are supposed to move so that the club face can be vertical, covering the hands, and pointing down the line.
March 17, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Seth. There is some forearm rotation and wrist set in the takeaway. Take a look at the Bucket Drill in the Takeaway Section. Unleash Your Thumbnail for Power and RST Pencil Tee Drill in the Advanced Takeaway Section for both details explained. It will create a clearer picture.
March 17, 2015
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Seth
Excellent. Thank you.
March 17, 2015
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Matthew
My main issue in my swing is the takeaway I have that tendency to move the club with arms and hands to quick which also caused to be tense in four arms and grip. Even after doing the drill for takeaway I still seem to have that tension what u suggest I focus on at this point?
February 27, 2015
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Matthew, take your arms out of the equation and focus solely on rotating the core of your body by moving the shoulder blade down and in towards the spine, roughly 2.5 inches. If you go through the progression in this video by doing the shark fin and bowing drills where the arms aren't being used, it will help you focus on the proper muscle movements. R.J.
February 28, 2015
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Terry
At the top, what does the left hand look like? Is it slightly cocked inward or straight and flat? thx
February 19, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Terry. The Left Wrist (for right handed player) will have some wrist cock and will be flat. Take a look at the Using the Wrist Efficiently Video in the Advanced Introduction Section.
February 19, 2015
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Shane
Love the new site. I have so far been unable to find the old practice sheets which had the number of reps to do for each part of whatever you were working on. They were a big part of my practice routine
February 4, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Shane. Thank you for the compliments on the new site. We are still working on some finishing touches and getting every component working for our members. Please contact Amy in Customer Support. Amy@rotaryswing.com. She will be able to navigate you better to what you are looking for.
February 5, 2015
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Edward
I do not have a lot of flexibility in my upper body. I find that during the takeaway my hips start turning after only about 20 degrees of shoulder turn. I've tried to counteract this movement but just end up just firing other lower body muscles (mostly quads) to counter the early hip rotation. This engagement of the quads (and overall tension in the lower body) doesn't seem consistent with the rotary swing fundamentals . I end up at the top of the swing with a pretty full shoulder turn and roughly 45 degrees of hip turn. However, even though I maintain flex in the right knee and weight on the inside of the right foot, at the top my right hip is higher than the left and my left knee is bowed out (looking down the line) further than my right. Is there anything fundamentally wrong with these positions? If so is there anything I can do about it other than continuing to work on upper body flexibility.
January 28, 2015
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Patrick (Certified RST Instructor)
Hi Edward, Regarding flexibility: make sure you are using the right side of your torso to rotate back. Watch the "Golf body rotation" video and practice rotating while sitting down in a chair. Also watch the "5 minutes to master rotation video as well" If your right hip is (or at least feels like) it's higher than the left, check your axis tilt at set up. Make sure you have about 8-10 degrees of tilt. Get into posture, put a club against your sternum, and tilt away from the target until the club head touches the inside of the left leg. Check out the "RST necktie drill" video to check your axis tilt at the top.
January 29, 2015
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Jim
New member and I watched this video for the first time. At the beginning he talked about rotation ,elevation and the right arm bend to complete the backswing. After 27+ min. I did not see anything about the R arm bend to complete the backswing. Did I miss something?
January 22, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jim. In the takeaway, you want the right arm to stay straight for as long as possible. Chuck veers into a little tangent in this video, but flexion in the right arm will help you complete the backswing. Take a look at the 5 Minutes to the Perfect Backswing in the Backswing Section and the 3 Functions of the Right Arm in the Advanced Backswing Section for more detail.
January 23, 2015
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james (Certified RST Instructor)
Hi Jim, The right arm bending will be working more towards the backswing - this video relates to the takeaway which is roughly belt high. You won't want to be bending the right elbow until your arms are reaching the bottom of the pecs . Check out the 3 functions of the right arm video and the 5 minutes to the perfect backswing.
January 23, 2015
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David
I feel a bit like in Ben's concern below. I have only just started looking at the videos, though after watching this one am concerned about my rotation. If I assume my address position and then place my hands together in the middle of my chest like I am praying, then turn to the right as discribed in the video... only using obliques and shoulder blade slide (no hip turn at all), when I get to my max. turn and lower my hands straight out and down, they point at my right foot. This seems not quite 45 deg. to me. I am a 55 year old 10 handicaper that has played golf for 30 years and pretty fit after previous years of triathlons, marathon running and now do weight training 4 days per week. I am concerned this core flexiblity is not enough takeaway rotation (when you take elevation and wrist cock out of the equation)? Is this enough initial turn?
January 20, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello David. I believe you have enough flexibility. It is rare to find a player that can't produce enough rotation to complete the takeaway. Your positioning sounds correct from your prayer hand movement. To complete the takeaway and have the arms in front. It will require elevation. You sound like you are on the right track and have enough.
January 21, 2015
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David
Bewdy! Thanks Craig
January 21, 2015
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Ben
In performing the exercises, I am only able to rotate my trunk about 60 degrees because of inflexibility. When I keep my hands aligned with my sternum, its impossible for me to get the clubhead to "cover" my hands in the down the line view like I was instructed to do in my swing review. If I am only able to get to 60 degrees before I elevate the hands, it seems like my plane is going to be going from outside to in. What am I missing here?
January 19, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ben. In the takeaway, only 45 degrees of shoulder rotation is required. You need a touch of wrist set and elevation to keep the arms and club in front. Take a look at the Role of the Right Arm in the Advanced Downswing Section. See if you can achieve maintaining the 2 inch gap and fingertip length to the completion of Move 1.
January 20, 2015
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Justin
If my lower back is on fire during these take-away drills does that generally mean I'm doing them wrong or right? Thanks, Justin
December 21, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Justin. You should feel it more in the shoulder blade and oblique area. Try sucking in your belly button. You might have a little issue of lordosis going on.
December 21, 2014
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Benjamin
In Chucks model swing he has a bent right elbow and i was wondering if that was an important part or should the arms stay straight.
December 20, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ben. The trail arm should stay straight. We don't want you to lock it by any means. Nothing in the swing should be locked or too forced. Try to achieve a relaxed, but straight trail arm.
December 20, 2014
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vivek
During takeaway, from DTL view my head tends to move away by 2 inches or so and my spine gets upright by 5 degrees and my club remains in front of my chest but way too front of the elbow plane line, however it feels I am connected to the core. Any idea why ?
December 10, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Vivek. You might be elevating too much from the shoulders. If you start adding elevation too early and continue to do so the spine can shift a little during the backswing.
December 10, 2014
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Ted
Well, i have had the wrong takeaway my whole life...Had my swing assessed by Steven Mais who was great in quickly highlighting this flaw (amongst others)...starting to work on this. This video is excellent and well explained...the start of the journey!
December 7, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Thanks Ted. Yes, many instructors love highlighting flaws without a clear picture of how to implement the changes.
December 8, 2014
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Doyle
Hi, I am 75 years old and used to play a lot of golf when I was younger. My career got in the way so I haven't played for a long while. I am now retired and very much want to get back into it. I started with the Premium enrollment, sent my first video and received excellent feedback. Here are my questions. 1. If I signup for unlimited feedback, is there an instructor that can concentrate more on my age and present ability so that I can accelerate learning? Or, are the fundamentals the same for golfers of all ages and abilities? 2. When I get back on the golf course next spring, do you have an app. or something to help me remember how to apply the appropriate techniques for different shots (e.g., drive, long irons, wedge, etc.)?
December 7, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Doyle. Welcome to the site. We would be happy to make your swing more efficient. With unlimited feedback the instruction is tailored to you. The fundamentals and principles of the swing remain the same. But, we understand sometimes age and flexibility can limit certain progression. Focus is made on smaller increments. Taking each pertinent piece and ingraining them to the best of your ability. You can always check back at previous reviews and notes you taken to help you get back on the course. Also, once the swing in further ingrained you can use the ball striking section to focus more on shot making than playing and just trying to hit positions.
December 7, 2014
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William
After doing the drills in the recommended videos for the past week I hit the Driving Range today and the results are quite pleasantly outstanding! I have lost that 'stuck-inside' feeling and the sound and contact from some of the strikes are a real pleasure. Still plenty work to be done and not every shot is the best, but at least I know what to work on thanks to all @ RotarySwing... Cheers! William
November 24, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
That is so awesome to hear William. Keep working at it and keep us up to speed on your progress along the way.
November 25, 2014
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eddie
Thanks for your response, what i was asking about the clubhead in relation to the hands is about the position. ie is it parallel to the line of the hands, or inside,or outside the line of the hands. Thank.
November 21, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
I meant the shaft in the previous statement. The club face should be perpendicular to the ground (toe of the club pointing straight up). The club head is attached to the shaft so if the club shaft is parallel to the ground and the target line, the club head will cover up the hands in the camera if pointed in the right spot. However if the camera is off the club will appear to be moved when it actually isn't. R.J.
November 22, 2014
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eddie
Hi, In the video you refer to the club hinging 25% when the shaft is parallel to the ground on the takeaway. At this point where should the clubhead be in relation to the hands. Thanks Eddie
November 21, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Eddie, The club head should be parallel to the ground and the target line. How far your hands are from the body, from the down the line view, depends on the length of the club. How far your hands are away from you in the face on view depends on the length of your arms. R.J.
November 21, 2014
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Pierre
Thank you for your response JR...I keep on working hard. I was a school director and I know that learning is a lot of work. I learn thai langage every day for more than 7 years and I do not speak like a thai 7 years old kid yet! Lol...
November 14, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Pierre, You're welcome. Lucky for all of us that it is easier to learn how play golf than it is a foreign language. With the proper training that is! R.J
November 14, 2014
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Pierre
When I do the reps in front of a large mirror, I do them just like in the video but when I go to the range and try to hit a ball everything changes. I know it because my girl friend takes a video each time and I look at it with my Pinnacle Studio Program or with the self analysis tool on the site . No ball, it's ok (because she takes video with no ball either); with a ball, l a lot of bad things occurs!
November 14, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Pierre, If it is looking good on video with no ball, then it's just mental, which means one of two things: One, you haven't completed enough reps the right way in order to do it with the ball being introduced or two, you've done it enough reps to do it right but you're thinking too much about doing it when you have the ball there. Once you have that figured out, you'll be able to continue with your improvement, Good luck! R.J.
November 14, 2014
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Pierre
I just compare my bad swing (hinge the right wrist and bend the right arm) with Chuck's swing... I saw that his club move up near the body and mine away so for getting up I must hinge badly the right wrist and the flaw occures. I made the 5 minutes perfect takeaway with my hands near my body at the beginning of the takeaway and I realise that it's easier not to hinge the right wrists... Am I O.K.??? 2 months of more than 100 reps a day (7 days a week) and I didn't get it already...it piss me off!
November 13, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Pierre, In your takeaway you should be focusing more on the rotation of the shoulder blade 2 inches down and in towards your spine than what your wrists are doing. The position that your arms are in will remain the same until the end of the takeaway, then the wrists start to cock, not hinge, upward towards the sky as the backswing starts. Keep working on it. Make sure that your takeaway matches what you see in the video before you start doing 1,000s of reps. Practice doesn't make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect. R.J.
November 13, 2014
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borja
Not sure about… when I finished rotation with a bit of elevation, weight shift and with my arms in front of the sternum… at the end my club is parallel to the ground but the head of the club is a bit away of my hands. Is these because I rotated 45 degrees? It seems on the video called Move 1- The takeaway that the club points to the target line. So, should the club point to the target line? or Am I lacking forearms rotation? Thanks
November 10, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Borja, You're correct, when the takeaway is finished, you want your club to be parallel to both the ground and the target line. You want your hands to be in front of your sternum at the end of the takeaway, but the wrist set that you get at the end of the takeaway starts the moment of the club moving upward in preparation for the arm elevation to complete the backswing. So, by the sounds of what you described, your takeaway is right on point. If you're still unsure about it, please take advantage of the swing review services on the site and allow an RST instructor take a look at it to further assist you. R.J.
November 11, 2014
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Pierre
It sounds good R.J., thank you very much... I'm still working hard for erasing 25 years of bad golf!
November 6, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Pierre, You're welcome I hear you there! It took me awhile to get rid of 15 years of bad golf, but it's possible for everyone! Just need to work at it. R.J.
November 6, 2014
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Pierre
It is not so easy that it seems. Stop hinging the right wrist is pretty difficult for me because I tried to make the takeaway without moving my belt buckle to the right and keep the right hand straight... so to have the club shat sets parallel to the ground the right wrist hinges behind and the right elbow bend a lot...very ugly position for the takeaway. The things are coming back after looking at the video "Unleah Your Thumbnail For Power". Clay Ballard explains: "During the takeaway there is a little bit of forearm rotation" that aloud the face of the club to be perpendicular to the ground and make the takeaway easier. Doing so, my right hand stays straight and I can have a full extension of the right arm in front of the sternum pulling back the right shoulder. Am I correct?
November 5, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Pierre, Once you set your wrists at the top of the takeaway and your thumb nails are pointing towards the sky, the club head will no longer be in line with the sternum, but the hands still will be in front of the sternum. You are correct that you want your right arm straight and your hands in front of the sternum throughout the takeaway. However, it's a lot easier to focus on maintaining the cupping that's in the left wrist, as opposed to focusing on keeping the right wrist flat. The right wrist leaves your eyesight a lot sooner and if you think about pulling with the right side the same time you're thinking about the right wrist, you're likely going to lose your angle in your right wrist and set the club early. 1. Put your weight into your right heel 2. Pull your shoulder blade towards your spine in a diagonally downward fashion 3. Maintain the setup angle of the left wrist throughout the majority of the takeaway 4. Keep the right arm straight 5. Keep the hands in front of the sternum 6. Rotate the shoulders 45 degrees, Hips rotate 0 degrees. 7. Rotate the forearms so that the thumb nails point to the sky at the end of the takeaway, as well as your right elbow pit. 8. Make sure your right shoulder is depressed and away from the right ear as much as you can (without over straining the muscles in the back) 9. Maintain the same spine angle from the setup throughout the takeaway These are some of the things that you'll need to do in order to produce a great takeaway. Some of them are check points to make sure that you're doing the other things correctly. The main thing is the proper rotation of the shoulders and then maintaining width in your swing by keeping long arms and proper angles in the wrists. R.J.
November 6, 2014
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Matthew
At the end of the takeaway it looks like the club shaft is parallel to the target line. Is that correct? If so, it must follow that there is some hip turn. Should I include hip turn in my practice for this drill?
November 2, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Matthew, There is little to zero hip turn in the takeaway. It's the elevation of the club and the little bit of wrist set at the end of the takeaway that sets the club parallel to the target line and parallel to the ground. Just focus on keeping the arms straight and in front of your sternum and then rotate your right shoulder back behind you by moving your shoulder blade down and in towards the spine. At the end of the takeaway, cock your wrists up a hair to parallel the club to the ground, you can't go wrong. R.J.
November 2, 2014
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Matthew
Ok. It just seems like the club would be at a 45 degree to the target line if it is in front of my sternum. I don't quite understand how elevating the arms would have that effect on the club line. I see how that helps get it parallel to the ground but not how it would help parallel it to the target line. I guess the wrist cocking could do it though.
November 3, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Matthew, Elevation actually has a lot to do with keeping the club on plane. Do your takeaway once while getting zero elevation. You will notice if you keep the club head close to the ground as you rotate, your club gets way inside of the plane line when you're rotated 45 degrees. If you follow the steps that Chuck teaches perfectly, you will be on plane every time. R.J.
November 3, 2014
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lou
Not a question, just a comment or two.The Shark Fin Drill has helped me more than anything else to begin to master the takeaway. First I do a lot of reps with the drill, left arm behind my back. Then with both hands on a club I visualize the hand at the center of my sternum and keep it lined up (in my mind) with the shaft of the club, for a good number of slow takeaway reps, adding in some awareness of left oblique for rotation and a little weight shift and some right glute awareness. The more reps I do with Shark Fin, the better I've gotten at visualizing the 'fin' when I have the club in my hands. Great instruction!
October 26, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
I'm glad you're finding success, Lou! Let us know if you need any assistance with other drills. R.J.
October 26, 2014
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Jordan
hey guys i'm still not getting the take away right i cant get the right shoulder blade to set right is there any drill or anything i should feel as i take the club back? Thanks
October 16, 2014
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R.J. (Certified RST Instructor)
Jordan, What part of your takeaway is breaking down? If you're having issues with the rotation part of it, check out the push vs. pull video. It could also be that when you address the ball and reach down for the club that you could be getting out of the box so, try shrugging your shoulders and then depressing them while you're in the setup and when you finish your takeaway to see if you are getting out of the box at any point. Are you not physically able to feel the shoulder blade glide down and in towards the spine? I think if you use the bucket drill it might help hammer out the issues that you've been having. Do you feel tense when you're trying to do your takeaway? Because we should allow our muscles to relax before our golf swing starts. It's really easy to tense up when we're thinking about all of the things that we need to do in order to complete the golf swing so, it's also possible that you're too tense. Send us a detailed description of what you feel so that we can better assist you or send in a swing review so that we can see what is going on with your takeaway. R.J.
October 16, 2014
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Hai
Hi, so during the first step of takeaway "rotation", there should be no arms elevation. In other words, elevation only occurs when the club shaft nearing or at the waist high. Am I right?
October 12, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Hai. You definitely want your focus to be on rotation first. Shoulder elevation won't be as late as when the club is parallel to the ground. It will be a little sooner as the arms and hands are working in front of the trail thigh.
October 13, 2014
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Larry
Should we be attempting to "hold" or "resist" our hips turning while rotating? I am less flexible than Chuck and to obtain the amount of rotation I think I'm supposed to I feel a lot of strain in my left hip area (I'm right handed). This is making my left hip very sore and I think this is wrong for me. I do believe that I'm getting a 45-degree difference between shoulder rotation and hip rotation (Chuck gets more) but to get the club pointing both down the line and still back at the center of my chest I feel extreme tightness in my left hip. I don't want to injure myself and I don't want to lose the "torque" or x-factor between hips and shoulders - What do you suggest??? Thanks!
October 11, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Larry -- We have a pretty large user base and at this point and I went it to your post and had to delete your email address as well as phone number out to protect your personal information. With that said, it sounds like you are running into some issues right from the address position. If you are feeling any sort of pain or overwhelming amounts of restriction, then something is probably wrong right from the address position. I would strongly suggest that you send in your swing for review and let our team take a close look at it. Remember to put in your notes all of the information that you have listed above. We will get things sorted out for you and make sure you are on the correct path right away.
October 13, 2014
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joseph
how do I make a video (what is the typical equipment) and get it to you (make a CD?). thanks
October 9, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Joseph. We use anything from Canon DSLRs to Casio Exlim's. Are you wanting to make a video to send in for review?
October 9, 2014
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Arnie
I've been looking at Chuck's iron swing down the line on the swing analyzer, drawing a vertical line straight up from the front of his toes, through his neck. This line ends up going through his arms and hands. I've noticed that through move 1, Chuck's entire left arm, from his shoulder down to his hand, always stays on that line, moving straight back along the line across his toes. Watching Adam Scott down the line, his left arm does close to the same thing. When I look at my take away down the line, and compare it side-by-side with Chuck's, everything matches up, with one exception: in the process of rotating through move 1 to the 9 o'clock position, my left shoulder ends up forward of my toe line. My spine angle has not moved. Is this something I should be concerned about, or is it unique to my anatomy (I'm much shorter and more stocky than either Chuck or Adam).
October 4, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Arnel. It could be unique to your anatomy. However, here are some thoughts. Losing the weight balance and pushing from the left. Take a look at the Swing Faults Caused by Poor Setup Video in the Advanced Downswing Section. If you lose the weight forward. The head and left shoulder will tend to move towards the ball. Also, the Golf Body Rotation Video in the Advanced Backswing Section. Make sure you are pulling and rotating back with the right. The only way that left comes out is push.
October 5, 2014
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David
Chuck says that you do not want to have a shut club face and bowed left wrist in the takeaway...however, that is exactly what he advocates in 'squaring the club face' on the downswing. Why is it a problem to pre-shut the club face when that is exactly what we start doing at the top of the swing all the way through impact?
October 1, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello David. You are going against the design of the club. The squaring on the downswing is rotating the face like it wants to do. Take a look at the Unleash Your Thumbnail for Power Video in the Advanced Takeaway Section. Clay will give you some good information.
October 1, 2014
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Benjamin
I just had a great swing review from James Rayson and agree that my takeaway really needs some work but I need a little more direction on which video and set of drills to start practicing.
September 26, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Benjamin. Glad you liked your review. Without seeing your swing. The biggest challenge is learning how to rotate off the ball. Using rotation and not too much arm swing. Take a look at the 5 Mins to Master Rotation in the Takeaway Section and the Role of the Right Arm in the Advanced Takeaway Section. Learn how to pull of the ball and keep the right arm straight.
September 26, 2014
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Benjamin
Thanks Craig! So to clarify when someone is struggling with their takeaway you start them with 5 minutes to Master Rotation before working on the 5 minutes to the Perfect Takeaway?That's the correct sequence?
September 26, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Yes, you are correct with your sequence Benjamin.
September 26, 2014
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Kyle
Hello, The takeaway is something I've worked extremely hard on. Looking at video down the line, it seems I have to lift the arms and roll the club face open in order to get it to not go inside too much. Feels like I really have to push the club outside in order to get it "on line."
September 25, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Kyle. You shouldn't have to roll the club too much. It could be an issue with your push or shoulder elevation. Take a look at the Understanding Elevation Video in the Backswing Section and the One Simple Takeaway Fix in the Advanced Takeaway Section.
September 26, 2014
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John
When I am practicing everything goes great; but when I go out to play I freeze over the ball. Any tips on getting out of my own head?
September 24, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello John. Take a look at the Trust Line Video in the Advanced Introduction Section.
September 25, 2014
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Bill
This is a great video... my golf swing worked well at the range after my first swing analysis, however, once on the course I forget the most important part... the takeaway... ooops now my back hurts!
September 22, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Sorry to hear about the back Bill. But, great news it worked well!
September 22, 2014
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Bill
Hi Craig, My back is fine, thanks for your concern... I can really tell when I am not swinging correctly though as I do get some kind of pain somewhere.. I have a question on my set up and takeaway.. When I tilt my spine in set up my head tilts to the right a little. When I try and straighten my head it feels real awkward? Is the head tilt a little bit ok?
September 22, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Bill. It is ok for the head to tilt slightly as you are adding Hip Bump/Axis Tilt.
September 22, 2014
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Jim
Simply the best video, everyone should be required to watch this one. Found 2 of my faults watching it. Excellant well explained video.
September 19, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jim. I'm glad you enjoyed. Getting the takeaway down will make the rest of the swing much easier.
September 19, 2014
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Jackie (Certified RST Instructor)
In the first 2 inches or so in the takeaway, I take the club back outside the elbow plane. I know I have the shoulder blade glide correct but I feel as though I'm elevating the club too early. When I do it in slow motion, it feels like I really only start elevating half way through the takeaway. What is a good swing thought so I don't elevate the club too early?
September 8, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jackie. Work hard with the club in the belly button as Chuck describes in the video. Train that the elevation is just a tiny movement compared to the amount of rotation. Let it leave the body very late.
September 9, 2014
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Marcin
Went out and played a round after practicing the takeaway concept. I used to bring the club back way to the inside which is why i'm focusing on improving the takeaway. The improvement in my iron game has been fantastic, but i'm having trouble with my drives now. before, i would drive the ball well by taking the club back on the inside because it allowed me to keep a flat swing plane. Now that i've improved my takeaway, i'm finding that i'm hitting my drives fat or that i'm skying the ball upwards getting too underneath it. Any way to solve this problem with the driver. I really like what the improved takeaway has done for my iron game, but i'm struggling with the driver here. Any way to improve that?
September 8, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Marcin. Now that your takeaway is improving it is making the the way you used to deliver the driver into the ball hard. The arms are probably not used to being as vertical. Take a look at the Re-Shaping Your Swing for Lag Video in the Introduction Section. Work on blending the weight shift, lag and arms swing down into the ball. This will help you maintain your levels and get the consistent shape into the strike.
September 8, 2014
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david
Hi, i have trouble with either being too deep (easy to do) or, when i counter this, i loop my hands outside the line on my initial move back. I cannot seem to find the inbetween path where the hands move directly back in a line. Is it a timing issue with arm elevation happening too soon? Or most likely incorrect biomechanics? Which is the lesser of two evils? Thanks!
September 5, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello David. Rotation off the ball is the big key, not swinging the arms and hands to move the club. It still sounds like left side dominance to me on both accounts. Try the 2 inch hand drill in the Role of the Right Arm Advanced Takeaway Section. If you maintain the gap and finger tip length remains the same, it should help alleviate the left arm push.
September 5, 2014
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Thomas
Chuck I have watched this video numerous times and it is just what I need.However,it seems like you are dropping your left shoulder as you take away the club??When I was hitting the ball pretty decently earlier in the season that was my key to starting the backswing. I have a problem keeping the right shoulder from moving behind me and creating a flat swing. Thanks . Tom
September 3, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Thomas. There is a little tilt in the shoulders due to hinging from the hips. I don't want you to focus too much of the left arm. If you use the scapula correctly going back and rotate around your spine you shouldn't lose your levels. The right shoulder should move behind you as the arms work up. Try some Golf Body Rotation Drills in the Advanced Backswing Section from a hinged position. Should help with the feeling and understanding the amount of tilt.
September 3, 2014
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Chris
The but of the club in the Belly Button drill starts out perpendicular (90%) to the sternum. Do your shoulders have to turn 90% in order for the but of the club to remain perpendicular to your sternum at pocket height?
September 1, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
At pocket height your goal is for 45 degrees of rotation with the shoulders and slight elevation to keep the club in front. Take a look at the Understanding Shoulder Elevation Video in the Backswing Section and the 4 Square Drill in the Advanced Backswing to learn the effects of elevation while rotating.
September 1, 2014
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Stephen
When the club is parallel to the ground where should it be in relation to your right foot, out towards the toes or more in the middle? Also, I feel like I can accurately complete the move when I am just doing the takeaway, once I try to complete a full swing it kind falls apart. How can I put it together with my backswing without it being robotic and jerky?
August 27, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Stephen. The club will tend to be out towards the toes, but not an exact measurement. Just make sure all the requirements are met. 45 degree shoulder turn, right arm straight, club in front of chest, touch of shoulder elevation, wrist set, and shift into glute. To make the blending easier you need to keep pulling back. Some people get robotic by only adding arm movement after the takeaway. You still need to pull as you add the arm motion. Take a look at the Move 2 Video in the Backswing Section to see the continuous pulling motion with the arm movement.
August 27, 2014
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Giampietro
I think it would be very usefull if you guys define when (and where) the takeaway ends and second part of backswing starts... that's becouse sometimes you bring your arms at 7-8 'o clok with no hips rotation and some times at 9 o clock with o bit rotation during takeaway videos... I really struggle to understand when hips need to start to rotate Thanks
August 25, 2014
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Steven (Certified RST Instructor)
Giampietro, The Takeaway ends when the club is parallel to the ground at about 9 o'clock. which is also known as Move 1..The backswing or back to target starts when the vertical motion of the club happens. This is known as Move 2. The hips start to rotate at the beginning of Move 2. There should be no hip rotation during move 1 or the takeaway. The hips turn as a result as the Right Shoulder Blade Glide Movement turning about 45*. At move 2 is where the hips are introduced into the swing. All the Best!
August 25, 2014
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Giampietro
But when there is a 45° shoulder blade glide moviment the club is not parallel to the ground... i should rotate almost 90* (at 9 'o clock, when club is parallel) before hips start moving... it sounds critical... When i see a pro swing from front view i can notice that hips start rotate at beginning of the take away. What's my mistake?
August 25, 2014
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Steven (Certified RST Instructor)
For RST we want to have the hips turn as little as possible in the takeaway. Once you have done the Right shoulder blade glide your torso will have turned 45* with 0* of hip turn. If you club in not // to the ground at that point you have not added any elevation or a little bit of wrist hinge. Most likely you are keep your arms pinned against your chest. My suggestion would be to submit a swing for review so we can really get a good look at your swing and help you out!
August 26, 2014
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Giampietro
Thanks Steven! I did not consider arms elevation and wrists cocking! I've already submitted my swing and i'm working on takeaway Soon i'll submit a new video Thanks
August 26, 2014
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Giampietro
How many degrees should the hips be rotated at the end of takeaway? Should they be at max rotation (45°)? Thanks
August 24, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
At the end of the takeaway the hips should have very little rotation. 45 degrees would be too much. Focus on bigger turn (45 degrees with the shoulders) and very small rotation with the hips.
August 25, 2014
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Norman
Hi RST Team, I do not feel my shoulder blade gliding, but pulling with the right obliques and a slight weight shift to the right is my thought to initiate the takeaway, while the arms remain totally passive. Is this ok?
August 21, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Norman. Its ok to feel that, but I would like you to at least try and feel the right lat. Practice the Golf Body Rotation Video in the Advanced Backswing Section. Narrow down the glide feeling.
August 21, 2014
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David
Little question regarding e 5 n to good takeaway. At one point the demo has the butt of the club in belly button perpendicular to the spine and waist while rotating. While observing the video later showing the blending move the club butt points to the belly button but doesn't appear to be perpendicular any longer. Question is, when performing this drill, is it imperitive to keep at 90 degrees to the spine or just in front of the body? Club at end of takeaway appears to be parallel to the target line is that true?
August 17, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
The club needs to stay in front of the body. As you elevate and rotate the club at completion will be parallel to the target line.
August 17, 2014
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Jackie (Certified RST Instructor)
I have been working to ingrain the blending of rotation and shoulder elevation. However, I am starting my swing with the shoulder blade glide and it feels like I'm dragging the club as I add shoulder elevation. In other words it looks/feels like I rotate, and then the club and arms are trying to catch up to my body. Would it be ideal to make a smoother/slower takeaway with the shoulder blade so it feels like the arms and shoulders are in synch with one another?
August 15, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jackie. Yes don't try to race or force the movement. Concentrate on a nice and slow glide. Sometimes in my swing it feels like forever. Keep everything in sync.
August 15, 2014
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Douglas
Should the first move/engagement on the takeaway be the right lat or the right shoulder blade? And should the left lat be saved for the downswing?
August 13, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Douglas. The left lat is primarily engaged on the downswing. Going back feeling the right lat pull will help engage the scapula to start moving down and in. Your weight shift or the pulling motion can be the first trigger.
August 13, 2014
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Caleb
One thing I'm confused about is the suggestion that the toe should be pointing up at the finish of the takeaway... If the hands are doing nothing but cocking slightly, they are not manipulating the club face at all, and in that case the face of the club should be perfectly parallel to the spine angle at 9 o'clock, which is not straight up. So how do I correctly manipulate my hands in order to get the face pointing up?
August 7, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Caleb. There will always be rotation of the face. Its not about manipulation, its about proper function of the body. Take a look at the Unleash Your Thumbnail for Power Video in the Advanced Downswing Section and the Using the Wrist Effectively Video in the Advanced Introduction Section for more information.
August 7, 2014
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Jeremy
In regards to the golf club during the takeaway. Is the club head supposed to be in front of the hands, or in line with the shaft of the club parallel to the target line? Thanks in advance.
August 1, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jeremy. The club will be in line with the shaft of the club parallel to the target line. Arms still in front of the body and not crossing centerline to early.
August 1, 2014
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neelesh
have watched this video about 9 1/2 times and worked on this for over 6 weeks. not exactly easy to carry out . I recognize that you need to get some extension into your takeway by the time the club is parallel to the ground. Meaning that your shoulders should have about half turned at this time (?). Another RST video says that you dont push your left hand to get extension but pull the right shoulder back. Question is how do you get this extension without your club getting sucked too far in? and without pushing the club out with your left hand. Hmmmm...
July 27, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
The right arm staying straight is what allows you to maintain the width. The left towards the backswing will start to extend more. You don't want to actively push from the left. The shoulders in the TW will be turned about 45 degrees. Shoulder elevation is what keeps the arms from getting sucked in too low.
July 27, 2014
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Jeffrey
Hi. I'm learning so much from your videos. I would like clarification, though, on the timing of shoulder elevation. It seems to be talked about during both the takeaway and backswing practice videos. Should it be a continuing motion through both or is it specific to one or the other. Thanks!
July 25, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jeffrey. A continuing motion through both. There is a little elevation in the takeaway ( hands to the base of the right pocket ) to keep the arms out in front of the sternum. Then the arms will continue to elevate to the base of the right pec.
July 25, 2014
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Gary
had trouble with the video stuttering but the" video help" was really good and fixed my problems quite simply , it was such a help , well done for including this feature. watched all the takeaway video's , just fab.
July 22, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Great Gary! Glad its working now!
July 22, 2014
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Gregory
one other question. In this video Chuck initially mentions R.E.F. which i have implemented in that order. Later in the video he does the elevation first then rotation. Should i elevate my arms before i rotate?
June 29, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
R.E.F is the correct acronym. It is easier to separate the motions first while training them. Understanding how the arms work. How the rotation works. Then blending the two. Rotation then adding some elevation.
June 29, 2014
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Gregory
love the site and the implementation of the lessons taught by the instructors in the videos has dramatically helped my iron and driver play (short game still needs some work). My question is regarding the weight shift to the right (the 1" we are to move). At what point in the swing should I make the one inch move to the right? I've done it after rotation and i have also done it right before elevation so that i don't raise up during elevation. Thanks!
June 29, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
The majority of the weight will be transferred in the takeaway. Sometimes we have our students concentrate on right heel, right shoulder. Planting the weight and starting rotation. It should be blended throughout the takeaway.
June 29, 2014
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Brett
Hi what should I be feeling in my right side once I get further into the rotation? I feel like my right lat gets really loaded as I continue to rotate. If I don't do this my right arm collapses and I end up "pushing" the club up with my left arm to finish the backswing which takes it on a more vertical plane.
June 20, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
You should be feeling the right lat, right oblique, and the right glute all engaged. The right lat aids in continuing the rotation and keeping the shoulder in the "box".
June 20, 2014
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Bill
What sequence should I be viewing the videos in? Like the perfect takeaway. Is that first followed by rotation, lag, etc
June 11, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
For the 5 Minute Series. In this order - Master Setup, Weight Shift, Rotation, Takeaway, Backswing, Downswing, then Release. Preferably, start the lag Videos once you complete the backswing work and can transfer your weight properly to the left side at your transition.
June 11, 2014
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Richard
The weight shift into the right glut on the takeaway was giving me problems. I figured out that making a slight hip shift/bump right just before beginning the rotation and elevation gives me a better feeling . I can minimize the hip turn to the end of the takeaway better and I feel I'm in a very stable position. If I don't shift a little I forget to load the right glut. Is this an OK way to work the takeaway or am I heading for trouble.
June 10, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
It's ok to start the load of the right glute to get the takeaway going. Some people use the thought right heel, right shoulder. Nevertheless, I don't want you to bump the hip to the right, then start everything else. Shifting into the glute to initiate motion won't hinder your progress. Make it one fluid motion.
June 10, 2014
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Paul
Those two 5 minute drills, with regards to the take away, are the most important drills I have ever seen. I only just joined up and with those two lessons, I have learned a ton. I also realized that it is not all that easy and you need to put in the time. Great lesson.
June 10, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Correct movements and time is the key to change. Most people realize that they start engaging muscles they've never even felt before in the swing. Awesome to hear you like the lessons.
June 10, 2014
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Jackie (Certified RST Instructor)
I've been practicing the move of trying to combine elevation with rotation, but when I go into my full swing shot to try and simulate the same feeling, it feels as though the club is coming too far outside and I'm swinging across the ball leading to slices and pulls. I am a scratch golfer and I am used to my tight draw ball flight so this is definitely a different ball flight. My original swing thought was to just rotate and not worry about my arms and I would hit a tight draw. Now that I'm adding elevation it is steepening my swing and I cannot hit the ball from the inside. Is it possible that my arms will elevate automatically if I rotate on a centered axis? It definitely would feel more comfortable that way.
June 4, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Jackie. Some people already add the proper amount of shoulder elevation, without needing to be taught. It's not automatic, but already inherit in their move. Make sure you're not adding much. The shoulder elevation in the takeaway is only to pocket height. Just a touch is needed to keep the club out if front of you.
June 5, 2014
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John
I have found that when trying to feel what its like to rotate my chest without my hips its really pronounced when you rotate your upper body while seated... Obviously you don't sit during the golf swing... but it really helps me feel what I need to feel when I am in golf posture... and proves you can actually rotate pretty far without your hips.
May 30, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Yes, sitting down and rotating the shoulders is a great way to feel the proper coil of the torso and spine,while restricting the amount of hip usage.
May 30, 2014
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Steve
Hi, when I am working on this, should I stop playing and hitting balls? I can do this perfectly as long as it is just a takeaway. As soon as I have to hit a shot, The body turn gets smaller and the wrist hinge/arm swing gets bigger. I have been working on this takeaway move for a long time, but I still don't have it mastered in my game yet. How do I now clear the mental hurdle to be able to do the move correctly on the range, and then another hurdle to do it unconsciously on the course? Thank you, Steve
May 23, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey there sconnol2, it is really just going to come down to more and more reps in a slow and methodical fashion when off the course or the range. Keep in mind that when you do go out and play and you are starting to get all that momentum in the club and losing kinesthetic awareness of the body movements, you are back tracking on the change. If you do decide to play, drill the move a couple of slow times in your pre shot routine and then walk into the shot and go. The more perfect reps you get in, the faster it will become an ingrained pathway and part of the subconscious behavior. Good luck and stay focused.
May 23, 2014
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Steve
Thank you Chris.. That makes perfect sense. The question still remain for me whether a lot of quality reps without a ball or club will directly translate to on - course improvement or if there is additional learning required. Like you said I need to go slow and avoid momentum robbing my awareness, and to drill the move a couple of times in my pre shot routine. Am I missing anything else? Thank you very much. Steve
May 24, 2014
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Michael
I recently sent you my swing videos and got very helpful and constructive feedback in the form of the takeaway and left knee laser beam drill. I was not keeping my hands in front of my chest on the takeaway and was bending my left knee too much on the backswing thus over rotating my hips. I have been practising as directed by the related videos but due to my rotational inflexibility I can barely manage to complete the takeaway while still keeping my hands in the correct position and not rotating my lower body. Also I and can only get my left arm to parallel to the ground on the backswing while not over rotating my hips. This, of course, significantly limits my shoulder turn, etc.. Have you any advice that can help me with this issue? Kind regards Michael Gregora ( age almost 66 ) - otherwise physically fit. PS. Previously I have used a book called "Yoga for Golfers" but got a spinal disc protrusion (now resolved spontaneously), so ceased the exercises
May 22, 2014
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Michael, we want to restrict as much hip turn in the takeaway as possible. They will rotate slightly due to the pulling motion from the right side. Take a look at the Golf Body Rotation Video in the Full Swing Advanced Backswing Section. See how much you can rotate the upper half against resistance of the lower half. If its a flexibility or pain issue and you need to let them rotate slightly, then don't restrict them as much. Nevertheless, see if you can get a 45 degree shoulder turn against the resistance. You can also try the Chair Rotation Exercises in the Golf Fitness Section RST Level One Program.
May 23, 2014
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rick
Hi Aaron, Thanks for the swing review. This is a easy fix and really worked right off the bat. I got into some kinda weird takeaway using my lower body. Anyway, good eye. Thanks, Rick R.
May 15, 2014
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Aaron (Certified RST Instructor)
Great Rick! That is how we roll! Glad to see it helped off the bat.
May 15, 2014
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Jason
Hey guys I've been working on the takeaway for some time and still feels completely unnatural I'm getting a much better shoulder turn but taking the club way to far outside. I have been keeping right arm straight in videos. I seem to be able to do all the drills fine time after time but put club in my hand and it feels wrong. And cannot feel any sort of shoulder blade glide I no there has been references made to being a similar movement to throwing a baseball but I can't make the connection.
May 15, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Often times it is hard to feel the engagement of the shoulder blade glide. If you look at the shoulder line on camera are you noticing any roundness to the shoulders at the completion of the takeaway or are they still depressed completely. Check out the pool noodle shoulder elevation video in the advanced backswing section for some reference points in the takeaway and backswing.
May 16, 2014
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yuji
First of all, I have to say rotary swing has taught me a lot in short time and changing concepts I had on golf swing. My question is that when your right arm gets flexion at the top, would right hand help to lift left arm higher? Prior to this clip, I was always use left arm to make my swing high and creating large arc.
May 15, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey there, glad to hear you are learning a bunch. You do not want the right hand working to pull the arms higher in the air. If you are noticing that your swing is a bit shallow then, you need to work on adding more shoulder elevation. Check out the pool noodle shoulder elevation video in the advanced backswing section and see if that helps. Using the right hand as you described can run you the risk of pulling yourself out of your spine angle.
May 15, 2014
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darren
I forget to add that I have no difficulty practising it and grooving it at home or in the garden. It all seems to go back to square one when I place a little white ball at my feet. There seems to be a huge distinction in results at the moment. I am looking to fuse the two. Should I go out and practice the takeaway with a ball at my feet and hit balls to try and cement feeling say 9 to 3 . For me when the ball is not there I can do it easily every time. Thanks Darren
May 12, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
You just need more and more and more reps as described below. When you get back to golf ball time. Shift the focus off the ball and allow the ball to get in the way of the movements you are creating.
May 12, 2014
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darren
Hi I have a big issue with hinging my right wrist when performing the takeaway which sucks the club on an inside track. 10 yrs of doing this is a hard habit to break !!!! I have been using a plastic ruler which is attached to my right wrist with elastic bands to help me feel the correct feeling. Can you recommend anything else to support me ingraining this ? I am using any spare opportunity to work on the recommendations of shoulder glide. Its a long road but for someone like me who has some very ingrained poor habits. How long could this take to make the changes. I understand completely the committment needed but it does get frustrating and you can see how easy it is to go back to old habits and accept the swing you have when patience starts to crack a little. Appreciate all your support. Darren
May 12, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Darren, it is probably going to be easier if you train one arm at a time in the takeaway. Flip the club over and work on the takeaway move with just the right arm. Introduce the left arm back to the mix as soon as you get the correct feeling. Then flip the club over and keep drilling. Slow methodical drills are going to be key to overcoming this ingrained habit of yours. Make sure each rep counts.
May 12, 2014
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Marc
Chris how's it going? I have been doing the takeaway drills 3,000+, and a lot of right arm only drills, shark fin drill, and a few other in the video, and I can for sure feel how to pull with the right side and feel my right lat engaged every rep. My problem is that before I started on my swing change I was rolling the left hand instead of pulling with the right side, and back then on camera rolling the left hand in my takeaway look dialed but it was far from it. So the issue Im having is when I add the club, I know I have completely taken the roll out, but when I add the club I can do the takeaway spot on with the club elevated from the ground about 2 inches, but then when I set it on the ground I have an issue pulling the trigger, without feeling like I roll the wrist even though Im not, it may just be an illusion of rotating and elevating. What do you recommend for me? Thanks have a good day.
May 8, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Mark, I am doing very well thank you for asking. Sounds like you are putting in some hard work for sure. Unfortunately it sounds as though you are going to have to drill and make a conscious effort to rotate the left forearm (pronate) in the takeaway to help keep the clubface square. You need to have enough rotation to get the toe of the club to the sky. There will also be a bit of wrist set to support the club at the completion of the takeaway. The right forearm should be reacting to the rotation in a passive way and be rotating (supinate) as a result. Does that help?
May 9, 2014
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Marc
Chris thanks for the response, so when I drill the takeaway with the club I can get it in a toe up position every time in the same spot when I rotate and elevate. The only problem that I have is that when I set the club down on the ground its tough for me to start pulling with the should blade guide, but when I have it an inch or two off the ground its no problem. Also I have completely silenced the hands in the takeaway just rotating and elevating which points my toe straight up and square, does this sound like Im on the right track? Thanks again.
May 9, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Mark, my pleasure! Sounds like you are on a great track for sure. You should eventually get a better feeling of the shoulder blade glide with the club on the ground the more reps you take in. I would also suggest you may want to try and engage the right obliques while the club is on the ground and see if you are getting better results without having to hover the club.
May 9, 2014
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Troy
When I make a bigger shoulder turn I have a tendency to take the club away more on the inside. Would I be right in saying I need a bit more elevation to avoid this and keep the golf club on plane and in front of my body?
May 1, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey troy, as long as the arms are passive then you are correct you will need more shoulder elevation to keep the club out in front. Check out the pool noodle video we just released for some reference points.
May 1, 2014
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I've been working on the takeaway for a couple of weeks now, and I believe I have it in good form based on what I see in the mirror. What indicators would I look for to say I'm ready to progress to the backswing?
April 29, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Make sure that you can perform a completed takeaway without having to think about it. Have someone ask you a question like, what did you have for breakfast while performing the takeaway. If you can't answer the question and perform the move at the same time, then you need to keep drilling before adding the takeaway. Dont try and stack the next piece on until you are completely ready otherwise you can cloud the brain and make it possible to have break down later on in the swing.
April 29, 2014
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Grady
Wow. This part of the swing plagues me. I have been doing the RST program for sometime now. I have seen massive improvements but i just started filming my swing on a daily basis and realize that my first move is taking the club way to far inside causing alot of compensations. What can I focus on to make sure i have a good take away? Is it to pull my right shoulder (right handed) behind my head? Thanks!
April 28, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Grady, yes that is correct. You want the shoulder rotation to start the movements of the hands and the arms. Pulling the scapula down and in is how you will here it described around the site but the result will be the shoulder blade rotating behind the head. Check out the bucket drill in the takeaway section and see if that offers some good help to your solution.
April 28, 2014
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rodney
Hi, could you guys do a video on shoulder plane? (steep vs flat vs perpendicular) I think the rotation portion of the REF can be misleading sometimes and lead to a more flat shoulder turn.
April 27, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
5 minutes to master rotation virtually does just this for you without having to discuss the shoulder plane directly. We are wanting the shoulders to rotate perpendicular to the spine during the move. We can possibly do a video on what to look for on a shoulder plane to see if they are not perpendicular to the axis.
April 28, 2014
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greg
On the takeaway, when do the hips start turning? Should the left knee turn inward toward the ball? When I think strictly on right shoulder blade glide, my hips don't enter the picture & I'm not turned enough. Thanks!
April 25, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
You want little to no hip turn at all during the takeaway. Only a slight shift of the hips is all. Restricting the hip movement during the takeaway is critical in loading up properly and creating separation between the hips and shoulders at the top of the swing.
April 25, 2014
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Juan
Hello Chris - when practicing this should I also incorporate the right hip shift as taught in the video "Weight Shift Part 2 - Right Hip Line"? or when does that come into play?
July 9, 2014
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Michael
It is difficult to focus on the right shoulder turning (shoulder glide) behind you as you initiate the swing.. It seems counter intuitive when you've always relied on a hands/arm swing to move the club away. The club still seems to be swinging inside.
April 19, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Micheal, this by far is one of the biggest hurdles to overcome and it does require patience and hard work to overcome it. Check out the bucket drill and work on focusing on the body movements and then allow the club to react to the movements you are creating with the body now.
April 21, 2014
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andrew
Does the left shoulder protract at all during the takeaway? I am getting the visual of the right shoulder gliding down and in toward the spine and have found that my left shoulder reacts in such a way that causes it to protract forward. Would this be classified as getting "out of the box" too early on the left side?
April 16, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
The only protraction from the left shoulder during the swing should be at the very top of the backswing. You may want to revisit 5 minutes to master rotation and see if that helps get you to rotate without the left shoulder coming up and out. Then slowly add the club back to the mix.
April 16, 2014
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terry
You guys need to do a section on grip and its importance as ive found having the right grip especially the righthand position and grip pressure is key
April 11, 2014
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Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Terry, we do have a few videos on the grip in the setup section of both the program and advanced video sections. Take a look and if you still find that you are missing some info, we can do our best to make another video.
April 14, 2014
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neelesh
brilliant video, seen it many many times already. Especially like the 'death by wrist hinge' statement
April 9, 2014
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René (Certified RST Instructor)
I agree completely. It's one of my favorites. When done correctly it prevents you from getting off plane already during the first move.
April 9, 2014

Simple Steps to a Pro Standard Golf Takeaway  

 

It’s been truly said that given a good grip and a sound posture, almost all errors in the golf swing stem from the method of starting it – in other words, from the golf takeaway.

No less an authority than Arnold Palmer, indeed, has said that with a good grip, a steady head and a sound one-piece takeaway “the rest of the mechanical side of golf is just a breeze.”

The Great Man exaggerated, no doubt, but the basic sentiment is correct. If only because by the time the takeaway is complete there’s really no time for any conscious manipulation of the clubhead and face - which would, in any case, likely be disastrous in its consequences.

Click here now for a step by step guide to the golf swing takeaway

So just what are the fundamentals of a sound takeaway?

Well, you’ve probably heard the phrase “one-piece takeaway” and what this really means that everything should start to move together - upper and lower body, arms, hands, and club.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AhhtNrdee84&t=83s

Start Back with a Turn of the Body

It’s particularly important that there should be no independent movement of the arms and hands. Rather, the club is started back by a smooth and deliberate turn of the body. Unless you make a really determined effort to resist it, this turn will naturally cause the hips to start turning as well. But they should turn less than the shoulders, something that can be ensured by keeping the legs flexed.

Focusing on rotation also means that there should be no lateral movement away from the ball, which in turn makes it much easier to keep the head steady.

Minimize Arm Involvement for a Correct Golf Takeaway Path

Departure from the one-piece principle often involves the arms taking the club back across the body and too far inside the target line. Not only does this lack of trunk rotation mean a major loss of power, but this action of the arms also pulls the club off plane leading to a blocked or hooked shot.

For consistent striking, the action of the arms should be restricted to a simple elevation in the vertical plane, but there’s no need for any conscious movement of the arms during the takeaway.

Golf Swing Takeaway Drills

If you doubt this, take your stance now without club or ball and simply turn your torso away from the target through about 45 degrees. You’ll find that this simple movement just naturally brings your hands to about hip height. And from there a vertical lift of the arms will complete a powerfully loaded backswing.

This simple drill is just one of many that can quickly help you groove a pro-standard takeaway

The Importance of the Press

But for best results, combine it with a press.

Don’t forget that it’s very difficult to make a smooth, one-piece takeaway from a completely static or, worse, rigid starting point.

The solution used by all good players is the press - a slight, sometimes almost imperceptible movement towards the target. This may be a push of the wrists, hips or, most often, the trail knee. With practice, your body will then “rebound” naturally into a perfect takeaway.

Click here now for some more highly effective golf takeaway drills

 

FAQs  

 

What do you do after the takeaway in golf?

Staying centered having the shoulder blade move (or glide) into the spine is a key move.  Check out this video from Rotary Swing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TTxc1Tq8ySs 

 

What is the takeaway in golf?

The takeaway is a simple, simple move to initiate the golf backswing properly.

 

Why is the golf takeaway so important?

If you can’t take the club properly back in the backswing, you are most likely doomed to fail throughout the rest of the swing.  It is the first and most important move in the golf swing.

 

How do you hinge your wrists?

When you're working on your takeaway, the club should always stay outside your hands, or in line with your hands, we never want it going inside your hands, that's a death move for most golfers. It all starts with wrist hinge, so make sure that you understand the difference between wrist cocking, and wrist hinging in your golf swing.

 

Perfect Golf Swing Takeaway

If you are wanting to perfect your golf takeaway, then this golf instruction video is what you're looking for. This video walks you through key checkpoints of the golf swing takeaway and gives you swing drills that you can do anytime and anywhere to master the takeaway. 

One thing you'll notice about the RotarySwing takeaway is that it's incredibly simple. In fact, biomechanically it involves the fewest moving parts possible! So, if you want a simple golf swing and a simple takeaway, pay close attention to how I discuss how the hands work in the backswing.

The golf takeaway is one of those typical conundrums in golf where the less you do the better your takeaway becomes. Most golfers add too many movements to their golf takeaway and this is what actually leads to problems. Typically this comes in the form of overusing the hands and arms. Swinging the arms across the body during the golf takeaway is a recipe for having a very powerless and inconsistent golf swing.

To be consistent in golf, you need to move as little as humanly possible while still producing maximum power. To do this, you want to focus on rotating your body during the golf takeaway rather than swinging your arms. It is your rotating body that moves the golf club, not your arms and hands. Once you understand this key concept, the takeaway becomes much simpler.

                The takeaway in golf is one of the easiest parts of the golf swing to get correct. You're starting from a static position and there's very little movement. However, it's probably the thing that I see in the golf swing that's messed up the most by most golfers. So when you're learning the takeaway it's imperative to take the time to learn to do it right, to understand the checkpoints, what you're looking for and why, and how all the things that you do wrong can mess up the rest of the things going on in your swing. So it's super super important that you take the time to do the golf swing takeaway right.

                So I'm going to go through all the checkpoints and then give you basically a program at the end that you can follow along with so you can start to feel and check yourself with mirrors and video to make sure you're doing these things correctly.

                The first thing I want tot alk about are a couple of the most common tendencies that I see. On probably 80-90% of the golfers that I give lessons to- whether it's at a clinic or in an in person lesson- do one of these two typical faults that I'm going to talk about. The first one I want to talk about is the wrist hinge. Okay? If I'm standing here to address and all I do is hinge the right wrist. So when you talk about wrist movement, if you've seen the Rotary Swing Tour instruction manual you understand moving in this plane is cocking and uncocking, this way is hinging and unhinging to keep things simple. So what you want to feel during the takeaway is that there's maybe a small amount of cocking which is okay but there's no hinge. Okay, and I'm going to explain why.

                First of all, when you put the right hand on the golf club it's really easy to move the club along ways just with hinging. This is a dominant move. This wants to happen during the swing, that's the direction you want to move the golf club and the quickest easiest way to move the club in that direction is to hinge your wrist. So that's what a lot of golfers do. So to start the takeaway the first thing they do is hinge that right wrist. So what that does, if you look from down the line, is it shuts the club face. Okay? So now we've immediately started out golf swing requiring some kind of compensation. Whether you're going to have a shut club face at the top, you're going to hold on on the way down or what have you. You have to do something to compensate for a closed club face, period. There's no way around it. So we obviously don't want to be building compensations in during the first six inches of the golf swing. So what you have to learn to do is keep that wrist in neutral.

                So there's a couple checkpoints for you to look at. First, when you move from the right wrist and hinge it, your right hand will tend to end up kind of on top of the club and your left hand will be a little under. So what I mean by that is if you do this, you can kind of get the idea that my right hand is slightly on top of the left versus this would be the left on top of the right, this would be neutral, that's the right on top. So now my club face is shut, my hands are underneath. If you look closely you'll actually notice that my left wrist is bowed. This action of hinging the right wrist, the left wrist has to do the opposite. It has to bow and so that's where you end up with this really shut club face and for most golfers they tend to do this and get the club way inside.

                Now my body if you watch from face on ... barely moving at all. But simply by hinging my right wrist, look how far I can move the golf club and never have to engage any powerful muscles. So if you wonder, you don't have any power in your golf swing and this is you, well you're not using any big muscles. You're literally just using the muscles in your forearms. Well how big are these? We need about 32 pounds of muscle to generate 100 miles an hour club head speed. Unless you have really big forearms like Popeye, you don't have 32 pounds of muscle so you're not going to be able to generate a lot of speed. Okay? Not to mention that it changes your path and plane and club face angle.

                So we don't want this. So what do we want? Well if you'll notice at address my wrist has got a slight amount of cupping in it, the left wrist. Because of how your arms naturally hang, when you bring your hand across and take your grip there's a slight amount of cupping in here. You want to keep that. It's that simple. You don't want to flatten it out, which will happen if you hinge from the right wrist or even try to roll your left wrist. And you want to keep that perfectly neutral. So let's look at that. If I'll do that from face on first. When I teach a lot of time I've actually put my thumb on the wrist joint to keep it hinged, and then I'll make them take the club back and hold that angle. So now my wrist is still angled, I still have the same amount of cupping that I had at address. Now let's see what that does to the club face. ... Well it's square. All I'm doing is taking back, keeping the same amount of cupping that my left wrist had at address.

                Now my right wrist is flat. Well guess what? When it's at address, it's flat. I'm not increasing this angle. Again, if I hinge my wrist 20 degrees I can move the club a couple feet. So this is really easy so if you're kind of lazy in your swing and you don't rotate, which we're going to talk about shortly, you're just going to do this and you're going to have a really armsy wristy golf swing and no power or control from your body.

                So first thing you want to check is to see whether or not the first move that you have is something like this. Your hands should look like they don't move during the takeaway other than if your body's moving. So right now my hands are staying exactly how they were at address. I'm purely rotating. Hopefully you can see that. So my hands are maintaining the exact same relationship that I had at address with my chest. I'm not moving my arms or hands, I'm turning my torso. No movement from here, okay? That's the first problem I see.

                Second problem I see is maybe someone who keeps their wrists intact but pushes their left arm across their chest during the takeaway. That's the left arm push. So what that looks like again is no rotation. See I'm not turning my body at all but look how far the club's moving. I can move the club all the way to the completion of the golf takeaway simply by moving from this left shoulder socket and pushing the left arm across my body. So when I do that, club's all the way back but I literally have not made any rotation whatsoever. So again this leads to a flat inside golf swing, not turning. This is detrimental for a number of different reasons. Obviously, I'm going to tend to swing really flat, I'm going to tend to swing the club too far inside, also I'm going to tend to kind of roll my arms and make it even more inside. And so on and so forth. So long story short, you just don't want to do anything with that left side. As you're going to learn as we work on this, you're just going to rotate. And I'm going to give you a couple golf swing drills as we start to do this to feel how to learn that rotation.

                So we know what we don't want to do and we know what most golfers do. What do we want to do? Well I use an acronym for the backswing. It's REF: Rotation, elevation, flexion. It's all you really need. There's obviously little details in there but that's your big mantra that you want to think about. You're going to make a big rotation, a big body turn. You're going to elevate your arm slightly and you're going to have flexion at the right arm. Those are all the things- the three keys to having a great backswing and be really simple.

                So, the first part we need to understand- Hopefully you've been following the 5 Minute series and you've added body rotation to your golf swing. Now most golfers I see do this really well when they're doing the drills if they followed along that video series, they turn really well. But as soon as they put the golf club in there, this is what happens. They get rid of that rotation and now they think they need to swing the golf club. Obviously we don't want to do that so let's throw the club, take the club out of the equation to start, okay? We're going to learn to rotate, elevate- and flexion we're not going to really talk about because flexion doesn't happen until the takeaway is done. There's actually going to be no flexion during this phase of the learning program. What you're going to learn to do is rotate and we're going to talk about the key checkpoints for that from face on first.

                So rotation. All I'm doing is taking my chest, turning like I'm going to talk to somebody to the right. Yes I'm using the shoulder blade glide. You don't need to make it some super complex thing. All you're trying to do is take your ribcage and turn. That's rotation, that's all it is. And you need to do this without facilitating it with a hip turn. This is what a lot of golfers do. I say okay, turn your back to the target, guide your shoulder blade. Whatever I'm using to describe to them. And they do this with their hips. So now, yes I have rotated. However I have no coil and my hips have moved a long ways. Now they're going to have to move a really long ways in the downswing. We don't want to add any of that extra movement. So all we're doing to do is rotate.

                And most golfers should be able to get at least 45 degrees of shoulder turn without moving their hips really at all. I can get a little bit more, I'm a little bit more flexible. That's all we're looking for. We need a tremendous amount of turn during the takeaway. Far more than you think you need, okay? The reason for that is I showed how little the arms have to move to move the club a long ways, but you need to feel the exact opposite. So a lot of times I'll tell people write this on the bill of their cap, or in the clinics I teach, I want you to kind of remember a mantra. Big body turn, little arm swing. And you can't overdo that. For most golfers. I've never seen anybody overdo it, okay? Especially when they put their club in their hand.

                So all you're thinking about, just leave your arms at address. Forget that you have arms, just kind of leave them there and turn as much as you can. Well now I didn't move my arms at all but guess what, my arms moved. If I look down, if you look down the line, if I rotate I'm not trying to move my arms. I'm trying to turn my chest so I can look at the camera. I'm rotating, not moving my arms, not moving my wrists, not moving the golf club. I'm not trying to move the golf club, I'm trying to rotate. That's the first part of the REF. The rotation, elevation, flexion. There's rotation. You need to turn as much as you can. So that's what we're going to be doing, is working on big rotation. Now my arms have no problem staying in front of my body.

                The takeaway when you're doing it from the Rotary Swing Tour model is the simplest way that you can possibly take the club back without adding any extra moving parts and building a tremendous amount of power. There's no fewer moving parts that you can build into the golf swing, other than rotating, using your obliques, using your shoulder blade glide to initiate it, and turning your torso. That's it.

                So now when we put the golf club in there, I'm going to do rotation. That's all I'm doing. I'm not moving my arms. This is, you've heard the term one piece takeaway. I agree with that concept, I just disagree with how it's typically taught. I'm trying to tell you what specific muscles to use to create a tremendous amount of rotation but a lot of coil, but not be swinging your arms and hands all over the place, okay? That's the first piece that you need to understand. Huge amount of rotation.

                Second piece, there is a small about of elevation that takes place during the takeaway. Elevation is simply this, stand straight up, getting good posture, put your arms straight out in front of you, and elevate them without shrugging your shoulders. That's elevating. You're using your shoulder as a hinge socket, it's a hinge joint. Just pretend that it is for this. Your arms do not move this way in the golf swing. That's in a horizontal plane, you want to think of them moving in a vertical plane because what's going to happen is rotation is going to create the horizontal movement, the depth of the golf swing. That's what you're doing to create the club moving around in a circle. The arms don't need to help with that process. The body's perfectly capable of moving the arms deep back behind you. So there's no need for your arms to try and facilitate creating depth in a swing because all you're going to do then is swing really deep and flat. You need to get the concept that your arms are only moving vertically.

                So when we add vertical elevation, it's what we call shoulder elevation, technically it's shoulder flexion. What you're really doing is flexing from the shoulder but we just call it shoulder elevation to get the concept the arms are moving in a vertical plane and I combine this with rotation. Now I'm creating a swing plane. That's how you create it. So now when I look down the line, I'm teaching myself elevation elevation, rotation. Now combine the two. Well if you want to keep your arms in front of your body, this is exactly how you do it. Rotate while adding a little bit of elevation. Now when we get to finishing the whole thing, we're going to do elevation, flexion- just hinging from the right arm. We're not going to talk about this a whole lot right now, just give you the full picture. Elevation, flexion, rotation. Now if I do this in my posture. Elevation, flexion, rotation- I just made a golf swing. It's that simple. What we're doing is learning to combine those moves as we do it at speed. It's that simple, and that's what the purpose of this video is.

                So, to get back to elevation here's what we're doing. During the golf takeaway there's going to be a small amount of elevation. My arms are hanging down naturally at address and I'm just going to move them vertically in this vertical plane while rotating. All that does is keeps the club a little bit more up in front of me. If I don't add any elevation from the shoulders, my hands are going to get really low and shallow and they're going to tend to work too far around my body. So you've gotta add some elevation to keep the club in front of the body and working up until we add flexion. It's a small amount. Basically your hands are starting out kind of down around the mid thigh. As you rotate on this inclined plane, they're going to move up to about belt high. Roughly belt high or pocket high during the takeaway. Not going to be way up here during the takeaway in golf. It's a small amount of elevation. So right now you can see they're down close to my knees, as I'm done they're up by my belt. It's that simple, okay?

                When we add the golf club, a little bit of elevation with rotation, perfect golf takeaway. That's all we're doing. I'm not moving my hands, you know that we're not hinging, I'm not bowing this wrist. I'm simply turning while adding a little elevation. That's all we're doing in the takeaway. So now let's put this together in a little workout program so we can have some more key checkpoints and learn how to do this very very easily.

                Okay. One other piece that we're going to add in this workout program is sitting into that right side just a little bit. It's a small weight shift, but it does need to happen. So I'm going to do elevation, rotation, and I'm going to let my hip shift slightly to the right so I push my right heel in the ground. It's no more than an inch, okay? All we're trying to avoid is this tendency, okay? Trying to load up into that right glute slightly. My head's not really moving but my hip is shifting slightly to the right as I add these two movements. Very small shift. If you can focus and feel that right glute and the right heel as you're pushing that ankle into the ground, that's all we're looking for. It's a small amount of weight shift, okay?

                So let's put this all together. We're going to do a little elevation, rotation, slight amount of weight shift in the golf swing, as I go back, big turn. Now on camera that may or may not look like a big turn to you, but you need to feel a tremendous amount of turn because most golfers don't turn nearly enough. They push their left arm across, they hinge from the wrist, they bow the left, they roll the arms. All of this is moving the club a long ways but I'm not using my body at all. We want big body turn. Remember the mantra. Big body turn, tiny little arm swing. Now when we look down the line, my hands will be perfectly in front of my chest because I'm not really moving them. I'm moving my body, shifting my weight slightly, and that's putting my hands exactly where I need them.

                So a few checkpoints here. The first thing that you're going to see the most common tendency, if you're watching yourself in the mirror, is for the golfer to disconnect and their hands to end up behind their body. So you'll notice first of all that my fingertips are no longer level, right? Because I've pushed my left arm across my body, my right arm has no choice. If it stays straight- which it must- If it stays straight, my fingertips will no longer be level. What most golfers will do is subconsciously bend their right arm and they're like "well my fingertips are level." Well yeah you've hinged your right arm. Your arms are- the point is your hands are still deep and buried and you're going to notice when you do this you're going to hinge from your elbow, and your wrist will tend to hinge. So now you've added two extra angles into your takeaway that are completely unnecessary. Keep the right arm straight, rotate, don't move your arms or hands at all.

                Notice my upper bicep and my upper pec are still touching. This is not touching. And I see this every single day. And people don't realize that they're doing this. Your hands- I'm going to turn to a 45 degree angle here so you can see exactly where my hands would be. They're going to be right directly at you because I am only turning about 45 degrees during the takeaway. So if I make a full turn, my hands should be right in front of the center of my chest, the buttons on my shirt. I shouldn't be back here, I shouldn't be way out here. If I just turn, they're going to be right in front of my chest. That's ideal. There's no hinging in the right arm, there's no pushing the left arm across, there's no hinging in the wrist. Everything stays neutral and I'm just rotating back. Okay? So if you feel this flying away you need to monitor this.

                Especially when you add a golf club into the mix because you're going to want to do this because you're going to want to follow the momentum of that club. It's heavy. It's easy to do this with your hands ... with just your hands. As soon as you add the golf club in the mix, well guess what? This is creating momentum and you're going to want to follow it. You've got to learn to control that. You've got to learn to swing, move the club with the body so that the club stays in front of the body. Don't let it start to move you around. You swing the club by turning your body. So this needs to happen pretty slow for most of you, and that's what we're going to do first.

                So, to get our reps in here's what I want you to follow along with. Get into your setup. We're going to start out standing straight up. You can have a normal golf stance width, that's perfectly fine. All I want you to do is practice elevation and do this 10 times, okay? All you're doing is teaching your brain the movement for the plane that your arms are going to move in. Okay? Now we're going to add 10 times rotation. Not pushing your head, not pushing from the left side. Just pulling your right shoulder behind your head, turning your ribcage away from the target. Turning your chest away from the target with minimal hip movement. So it's not this, and it's not this, it's just rotation, okay? Now let's combine these two moves, rotation and elevation while standing straight up. Minimal hip turn, while adding rotation- excuse me- with a little bit of elevation. This is all you're trying to do in the golf swing. I'm not moving my head, I'm not tilting back. I'm going to add a little bit of weight shift in here with my elevation. And I should be, if I do it from down the line, my hands should still be right in front of my chest.

                Now let's do the same thing in our golf posture. So hinge, let your arms hang down naturally. Don't hold them way out here, that's cheating, that's not where you're going to hold the golf club, and you've already elevated too much. So let your arms hang down naturally where they're going to be when you grip the club, hands one inch apart. Rotation, elevation. Now first you can start to segment this. So make sure you get the rotation right and then add a little elevation to teach yourself where your hands need to end up during this first move. So you don't have to try and blend then together just yet. Okay, so just do rotation first, keeping your hands one inch apart. Remember we're not drifting away. Just rotation and then start to add a little elevation. Look at yourself down the line in front of a mirror, your hands should be about belt high.

                A good golf swing drill when we add the golf club into this, which we're going to do now, is stick it in your bell button. Take the club, hinge over, stick the club in your belly button and choke down on it. Try to get where you'd be at address. Your arms might be outstretched a little bit, that's okay. What you want to find is that first of all, if you look from face on, that club forms a perpendicular angle to my torso, to my chest. So in other words if I move it pushing from the left, it's no longer perpendicular to my body. Can you see that? So if I'm doing this, this is no bueno. Okay that's all pushing and just swinging arms, there's no body movement in there at all, and my arms are gonna swing deep behind me. So I want to keep this at 90 degrees while keeping my right arm straight. So I'm not doing this, that's going to show that I'm pushing my left arm across my body. My right arm stays straight. Now if I add a little elevation it comes away form my belly button. That's the key. Rotation, elevation.

                So now the club is still pointing at my chest at the completion of the golf swing takeaway, okay? If we look from down the line. So I'm going to go rotation, a little elevation. The club is still in front of my body, still 90 degrees. However I elevate a little bit, it moves away form my belly button. It's a great drill to learn how much you need to elevate while still keeping your arms in front of your body. Okay? So you can do that drill starting out just with the club and then add weight shift to that. Let your weight go slightly and push that right heel in the ground, stabilize those hips, a little bit of rotation, a little bit of elevation. I should reverse that, a lot of rotation, a little bit of elevation, no horizontal arm swing. Okay?

                Now once we master that with the club in our belly button, we can take our normal address position okay? So now we're going to hinge, let my arms hang down naturally, and now I'm going to keep everything exactly how it is. I'm going to do rotation, big big body turn, tiny little arm swing. A lot of times I get question asked, "well when should I hinge my wrist?" By the time your hands are about pocket high, the club should be parallel to the ground. Somewhere between belt and pocket high. That will typically require a little bit of wrist hinge. Or excuse me, the term I want to use here though, is it should feel that it's wrist cocking, not wrist hinge, okay? Now technically your wrist is hinging because of the angle that it's sitting on the golf club. However you don't want to encourage this motion. This is death for every golfer because all it does, again, is shut the face and moves the club deep behind you.

                You want to feel that this is the only motion happening. Again because your wrist is on the club in a turned position, there's a little bit of hinging there. Almost at a 45 degree angle between true hinging and cocking okay? But I want you to focus on feeling that the wrist cocks up. Down the line this will start to make a lot of sense. If I feel that I hinge my wrist, I barely felt I moved. I'll show you how much I moved my wrist. It's that much. You can imagine, it doesn't take a lot of muscular effort to do that, especially when I've got this heavy club swinging around me in space, creating a lot of inertia, there's a lot of momentum. So this is really easy to do, and now I'm stuck and it's all compensations from here. Learning to keep that wrist straight and feel like I cock up, now the club is moving in a vertical plane and the club doesn't get behind me. It's that simple. That's why so many golfers, so many amateurs end up here. It's from these simple little movies. Rolling the left wrist, hinging the right. Okay?

                So to answer the question when do we cock our wrist? Well when the swing is about ... this is about halfway done roughly. When you're here, or when it's a quarter of the way done, you still have about half or a quarter of the way of the wrist cock. So in other words, you're going to have- if this is 25% of the swing, you're going to have 25% of your wrist cock. That's a simple way to think about it. So I'm going to add- if I didn't cock my wrists at all and I made a great turn, notice I made a good turn, the club is just not quite parallel to the ground. Add a little bit of wrist cock. That keeps the club moving vertically in front of you, rather than swinging around behind you.

                So just add a little bit of wrist cock. Notice my left wrist is staying neutral. If I hinge, my wrist is now flat and bowed. And you can see what that does tot he club. You don't have to be a rocket scientist to realize that's a bad position to be in. If I feel that I cock my wrist up while making a big turn, now the club stays in front. That's all we're trying to do. So you want to add a little bit of wrist cock that's gradual throughout the whole swing but as you're checking for your takeaway, all we're going to check, parallel to the ground, club is about pocket high, I've made a tremendous amount of core body rotation, my hands and arms have barely moved at all they've stayed right in front of my chest.

                You want to do that as many times as you can so if you're going to work on your swing each day, if you can get 100 reps in, once you've mastered the other little pieces of doing it without a club, working on elevation separately, working on rotation separately, getting the checkpoints that I mentioned in the article as well as in this video so far, that's going to help.

                Now the last thing I'm going to do is give you one more little drill. I call this the shark fin drill. I just made it up because, I call it that because you kind of look like a shark. You're going to put your hand right in the center of your chest. Your right hand only, pull your left hand behind you, and start to rotate. The reason I use this drill is because so many golfers dominate the backswing with their left arm trying to create a swing plane, trying to move the club. That's a very dominant move that you have to learn to break. When you take your left hand out of it and move from the right side and keep that right hand right in front of your chest like a little shark fin, well now you're starting to feel how you rotate and pull your shoulder back, minimal hip turn, and nothing from the left side.

                Same thing we did in the rotation drills when we put both hands on here and you started feeling whether or not you were pushing from that left side. Same thing when we add the golf club into it. We want to just feel big turn, tiny little arm swing. So we take the left arm out, which is typically a culprit of pushing. Now when we add the golf club, we can kind of do an extension of the shark fin drill which is just doing the club, taking the club back, right arm only, keep the left arm out of the picture. Now this si the golf swing. I'm rotating back, my arms are barely moving. From down the line, I'm making a great golf swing takeaway and my right wrist has not changed. Nothing's changed, I'm just turning while adding a little bit of shift, a little bit of elevation.

                That's all we're trying to do in the takeaway in the golf swing. If you can master this simple little part, the rest of the golf swing is so much easier. But if you screw this up, which you can easily do within the first 12 inches of the takeaway, the rest of it's all compensation. So we want to work really hard on the takeaway to make sure we get this simple little move, watch all the checkpoints. You don't want to be hiking your shoulder up, swinging your arm across, you don't want your head moving way off the ball, all these things. If you can master this, take the time to do the reps, the rest of your golf swing will be a piece of cake. 

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