Simplify Your Backswing with Shallow Arms

Make this one simple change to reduce tension in your backswing to start hitting more EFFORTLESS shots today! Tension KILLS your golf swing and this one simple tweak will make your swing more compact, easier to repeat for more consistency and help you feel more effortless on every shot.

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Jesse
How does this square with the video Chuck did with Rory where he has completed most of his backswing by the time lead arm is parallel in the backswing, with his trail arm still extended? Thanks!
June 3, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jesse. Same thing. Just less elevation. Both players/swings require shoulder rotation. You can allow for a little more flexion here and lower position, but you still have to rotate. Rory is just maximizing his elevation with rotation. So, the swing would almost essentially be completed by Rory's in this drill.
June 3, 2021
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Jesse
Got it, thanks Craig. Does the elevation occur simultaneously with the shoulder rotation? I play with a guy who actually stops his rotation, and then raises his arms. Works for him, but looks cumbersome. Also, can you tell me the name of the Rory video?
June 3, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jesse. Elevation does start in the takeaway and it's almost simultaneous. Take a look at the 4 Square Drill, or Pool Noodle Drill Video. #2 - Simplest, Fastest Way to Boost Consistency Video I believe is the one you are looking for.
June 3, 2021
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Gary C
Starting to really feel my shoulder blade glide back and down as described in the DD1 video now that my arms are shallowed out. Notice thought that the club comes on a more in to out path (or maybe it just feels that way to me since I am finally getting the upper body loaded properly) and with the RST grip it seems the club face, when I go slow, is noticeably closed at impact. In to out path with a more closed face will give me a bigger draw, right? Biggest question at this point, now that the arms are shallow in my observation or feel on the swing path correct (generally) and how does this grove with the stronger RST grip? Will I likely need to make my grip slightly less strong or neutral to agree with this swing path? Should I worry about this at all while I’m still drilling at home in front of a mirror or just see what happens when I start hitting balls?
April 30, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gary. That would give you a bigger draw. But, the face shouldn't be overly closed at impact unless you are manually steering the release a little. Stronger grip will tend to allow for a little more lag angle and release. But, will limit how much control you have over controlling ball flight. I wouldn't worry about the grip to manipulate the in to out. But, use it more thinking about the shot shape and desired flight you will want on stick shots. Also, how comfortable you are with more/less lag.
May 1, 2021
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Gary C
When I go slowly enough through the drill that I can relay pause and observe/check specific positions I am naturally getting a lag angle at post up where the club is above parallel to the ground, maybe 15-20 degrees. I am fine with all that and honestly I haven’t been worrying too much about that and more focusing on a light grip that allows the club to rotate and release naturally so the club head rotation does the work of rotating my hands and arms naturally. I have also been more focused on the shallower arms. I’ve been really just keeping my focus on my lower body (hips and heels/ankles) with my focus just letting the trail hip sort of start the backswing and just letting my arms get tossed upwards by the lower body (not exactly what happens, I know, but that feeling or thought is helping me keep my arms passive and I am getting a consistent result where my left arm is in line with my shoulder and now I am also feeling a proper load in my right shoulder blade as it moves back and down) and then on the downswing I am focusing on my weight simply shifting from my right heel/ankle to my left and feeling my lead hip rotate. Then I check arms and they end up right where they should be. I am trying to focus on things that both keep it all simple and allow me to make it fluid and easy. I am very comfortable with the grip and I get into position and get my grip setup and then check in the mirror and make sure I am consistently hitting my check points there with the v-lines running parallel and up my right arm. All that is good but then as I’ve shallowed my arms I noticed that the club head seemed pretty closed at impact but I may be manipulating it more at a slow speed than what would actually be happening at tempo. I guess my biggest concern is that I will go from having a co distant slice of push slice to over correcting and getting a hook or pull hook everytime. I think I feel more comfortable with the club head ending up slightly closed at 3:00 as a security measure against my slice I always had and maybe that is causing me to manipulate a bit rather than letting hands stay passive. I have drilled a bit manipulating the hands to end up really closed (logo facing the ground) at 3:00 just to over exaggerate the feel of the release and to see if I could consciously manipulate the face through impact. Right now I just want a stock draw that is consistently playable but not excessive or anything. Not sure if that’s describing more of a baby draw or a bigger draw is still okay? I may be way overthinking all of this or at least right now as I am still drilling without hitting balls. Also, it seems that with the shallower arms and keeping everything really passive and relaxed my entire swing tempo seems to groove best at a tempo that feels really slow. The release and impact feel powerful but the entire swing feels much slower than I think the tempo I had before and was expecting. Is this all normal? What are your thoughts on all of this as far as my focus points and anything I should change in how I am drilling this?
May 1, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gary. When going slower it can tend to close. At pace I would expect less manipulation and you should be ok. These are just describing draws. Unless you really start closing down the chest too soon and overly closing you will not have to worry about major hook. Cause the release will still be passive. The hook you would have to be actively manipulating. Tempo will be slower when sequencing and loading correct muscles because you are less reliant on arms which is the only thing that kind of moves fast that gets players out of whack. Only think I would adjust is try not to stay to slow and start to build some fluidity and feel to minimize thought.
May 1, 2021
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Gary C
So basically if I am hitting all the checkpoints correctly in all the RST components (grip, shallow arms, passive arms etc) then my stock shot should be firmly in draw category? Also, is there any metronome range or guideline for full speed tempo? I know that’s really subjective to each individual. Is it okay to have a very slightly pause at the top? That seems to help me with the sequencing, though the shallow arms also helps a lot with that too. Also, does the club face position at 3:00 serve as a guide to anything regarding how square the club face is at impact when I’m drilling at full speed without a ball or do I just focus on drilling the fundamentals properly so then I am relying on properly ingrained movements at full speed and trusting my body to execute properly practice movements. Ball flight will tell all once I get to the range I suspect.
May 1, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gary. Stock shot will tend to be straight, but with draw bias. Usually 3:1 is the tempo margin for players. You can have a pause. Just know you will have to be super patient and make sure the legs start the downswing with soft arms/hands. 3 O'Clock can be a little reference for sure. I would tend to miss toe up or slightly down. Not open face.
May 1, 2021
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Gary C
My arms appear to be in line with the shoulder or even slightly below. Is that acceptable? Can arms be too low on this?
April 29, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gary. In line is fine. Elevation is variable. You can be too low because you want a little just to help you out with leverage and free speed.
April 30, 2021
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Jef
I really like this video and this swing change idea. I notice from a recent video that I tend to target my backswing toward my neck or ear. I then tend fly my right elbow and bend my left arm which removes my depth. My question here is: Should I target my right shoulder? This would seem to eliminate the chance to fly my right elbow and would seem to force my left elbow to stay straighter. Is this a correct assumption? The higher my hands have gotten the worse my top of swing has become. Thanks!
March 30, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jef. Targeting the trail shoulder should be fine. Yes, we've seen when people start getting consumed by adding more elevation it tends to mess things up vs help. And, the advantages of being higher aren't very much in the long run.
March 30, 2021
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Joey
Love this drill,I’m making this my primary focus this Spring.Quick question however should you move the ball closer than I’m used to since I’m going to be shallowing out my swing having the hands closer to my body ?
March 5, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Joey. You still will fully release the club. The ball position shouldn't need to be adjusted.
March 5, 2021
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THOMAS
Thanks for it all. This is pretty much all I've worked on this winter....this more shallow backswing with no unnecessary raising of the arms...and the clamshell into the lead hip. I also got a little more shallow at the top with just a touch more trail wrist back-bend ...and I have been noticing similar in Daniel Berger's shallowing in transition. With slow-motion swings I'm making sure I get that rear elbow leading in the downswing.... which I've also noticed helps the face come in square. All that time in front of the mirror doing these moves I now feel the sensation of being able to control the movement of the lower body...the action of the glutes... more independently from the upper body. Finally, I got in enough winter rounds between the bad weather to prove this all with the sensation of hitting some great shots. Hurry up spring 2021!
February 17, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Tom. Thanks for the post. Come on Spring! Time for all that hard work to start paying dividends for you.
February 18, 2021
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Ronald
Will this simplified backswing work with a 3 wood or driver? I understand I probably won't get the distance, but for accuracy?
January 24, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ronald. Yes. Also, with all the research into the arms position. You will still be able to have good distance.
January 25, 2021
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Stefan
Hi Craig, In my last swing review you said that I overswing. Can you please explain? Are there more videos than this one which could help me to overcome that problem?
December 9, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Stefan. The trail arm is too active and the arms move too far. Yes. Take a look at this video: 2. Overview: Fix Overswing/Across-the-Line Swing and 3 Functions of the Right Arm.
December 9, 2020
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Kyaw Thet
Hi Craig, I am working on low hands backswing; when I get to the top I stop to check if I the club position was correct. When I stop at the top It forces me to use my lower body and my core during the downswing. It feels more compact and effortless with low hands. I think low hands is the right choice for me.
December 6, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Kyaw. I tend to be lower hands. No issue with you focusing on this position.
December 7, 2020
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Gavin
Picture below
November 29, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gavin. Be aware if the trail wrist starts to go back on itself too much the club will start to shut.
November 30, 2020
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Gavin
Hi Craig After the swing review have been doing a lot of swings to the top, is this the position you're OK with? It looks good to me and helps me stay in my right heel and not fall forward into the ball.
November 29, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gavin. Maybe a touch laid off. But, the arms/club are much more in front and tidy compared to normal.
November 30, 2020
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Harry
Chuck-This video combined with your prior instruction (hit the ball with your legs, let your arms and right shoulder "chill" in the downswing, stored right shoulder tension leads to downswing problems) has enabled me to experience an effortless golf swing for the first time in my life! The club passively drops into the slot and gets released. Impact is solid, shot dispersion is minimal, and distance is as good or better than when I initiated my downswing by firing the right shoulder. I played 27 stress-free holes today that were so much fun (35, 77). Thanks again for the excellent instruction!
November 23, 2020
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Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
YESSS! That's awesome Harry! You're experiencing the promised land!
November 26, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Harry. Awesome. Thanks for the post. Love hearing that effortless swinging power and precision.
November 23, 2020
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Chris
Hey Guys, 1) Can you please confirm that this right arm position would be the same if you were to slap someone at around waist height? 2) Is it correct to use the arm position feeling at address? I think my right arm at address is more rolled in from prior instruction (This was to assist the takeaway not going too inside - possibly a band aid fix/bad instruction)
November 22, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Chris. The trail elbow pit will still be facing away at address. You are still shooting for a proper takeaway and going for the lower/more shallow position at the top.
November 23, 2020
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Lorenzo
Hi Chuck, I'm a RST member for many years now and I know I'm also a "right side" dominant golfer. Tried with the help of Craig to overcome this also my flat back swing, tried to change that to have higher elevation although that does not feel natural to me. I was glad that you came up with the flat / low backswing and the "overview of the push release" video. But the last two videos are confusing like other members already mentioned. In the last two videos, especially "Simplify your backswing with shallow arms" you mentioned to use the left side and you should not use the right side contrary what you "dicdated" in the "overview of the push release". Could you explain this?
November 21, 2020
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Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
The push release is an optional way to release the club for those who struggle with being right side dominant. Anytime you rotate your body you use both pushing and pulling muscles, they work in pairs. Most golfers overuse just the pushing and that is what leads to issues so there has to be balance but you need to lead primarily with the lead side no matter how you release the club. Then you can add trail side as much as you desire to speed up the rotation
November 21, 2020
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Leo
Chuck, I am a premier member and this right side swing push method looks really interesting. Thanks for all your work. I am a retired airline pilot living in Denver at Heritage Eagle Bend. I get lots of aviation videos and this one below I thought you would think was funny. Considering your “need for speed” and being a new pilot. The speaker is Major Brian Shul an SR 71 blackbird pilot. Leo Allison https://www.facebook.com/1690922357857677/posts/2677800185836551/
November 19, 2020
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Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
One of my favorite all time pilot stories! I have only been flying since 2017 but do love it.
November 19, 2020
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Lee
Please comment on wrist hinge. I have always thought the motion was up and down with flat wrist to avoid timing issues.
November 19, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Lee. The trail wrist will have to hinge a little in the backswing as you reach the top. You don't want excessive hinging, but it will help support the club . For the lead wrist to be flat the trail will have to be hinged a touch.
November 19, 2020
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John
I've always had lower arms in my swing, and at times too low. I started experimenting with higher hands about 2 months ago, and have found that I don't pull my shoulder blade back as much in that position. Is there a drill to keep me from pullinng my shoulder blade back as much when my hands are lower?
November 18, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello John. You still want a full shoulder turn, but some players over do the shoulder blade glide. My suggestion would be trying to engage the core more to rotate so you have some blend. Take a look at Body Rotation in Golf Backswing - Chair Drill.
November 19, 2020
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Dave
Worked on this today. 39 degrees and windy. Found the swing easy to repeat even in the conditions. I knew a steeper shoulder turn was part of my equation. Shallow arms. Kinda wide. Steep turn. Clam shell. Suddenly pieces fell into their proper place.
November 18, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dave. Tough conditions. But, sounds like some good swinging.
November 19, 2020
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Mike
Hi chuck So if you can get this shallower backswing correct . Then the downswing is following clam shell move and release club . This means under pressure, if you have trained all correctly, you only need to follow the core motion and release Thank you
November 18, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Mike. Working hard to make it simpler and simpler!
November 18, 2020
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Pete
"The Role in the Right Arm in the Takeaway" video recommends that we keep the right arm straight as long as possible in the backswing. Here, there seems to be more focus on the folding of the right arm and the hinging of the right wrist. Is there a change here?
November 18, 2020
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Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
I never said bend it early. I simply showed how little it has to move overall
November 18, 2020
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Stuart
This makes a lot of sense. I'm currently just doing left arm drills and realising that it's really hard to get the club up there without tension; whereas, if I imagine coming under my body, pulling up with the free right hand, it's easier to turn the body to get the hands up. That said, from a physics perspective, wouldn't the hands dropping from a higher point impart more momentum?
November 18, 2020
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Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
Not that simple. You have to either actively shallow out the hands from a higher position or slow down the body to give them time to catch up or add more shallowing moves etc.
November 18, 2020
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Stuart
Thanks. I'll stick with low hands. I have a hard enough time separating the left hip from the shallowing out, causing me to a little early spinning out the shoulders. The Clam drill seems to help. I also find feeling that connection between the left arm and the body helps.
November 18, 2020
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David
Hey Chuck, I fight the dominate trail arm in my swing and have been trying to work through your push release concept. Is this related or is this lead arm specific? It doesn’t take much for me to make a mess of my swing so I wanted to be sure! Lol
November 17, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello David. This is for both. The arms staying in the lower position to make shallowing easier. Both swings need a shallow plane.
November 18, 2020
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Kyaw Thet
1. Do I need to hinge more at set up for shallow arms? 2. Will that affect how far I stand from the ball at address?
November 17, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Kway. You just need to make sure you are properly hinged. Distance from the ball shouldn't change. Most arms players tend to swing too flat versus rotating around their spine.
November 18, 2020
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Jack
Thanks Chuck. Your videos are fantastic. I really like this one, but I noticed it seems your posture at impact has changed over time. Less upright, more over the ball to me. Like you I am fused but at L-1 to T-8. I can sit into my left side 100% with lead arm, but not when I attach trail arm. Is there a video showing where your upper body vertical tilt toward the ball should be at impact. Also exercises to assist in mechanics of clam shell drill? Thanks
November 17, 2020
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Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
There is no preset amount of tilt. You simply need steeper shoulders with shallower hands.
November 18, 2020
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Andrew
Chuck, been a member since 2009 and I love your stuff but I have to admit this is the first time I find myself confused. Your 3 stage “ rocket” analogy In the push release video was great—first stage after the weight shift is firing the right hip —but this video seems to suggest a lot more left hip lead on the downswing. I get the shift back is first but now you seem to be much more focused on the left hip firing. You also suggested in an answer to Bill adding right side is ok for some but you don’t do this....help! Andy
November 17, 2020
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Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
As i wrote to Bill you always have you shift your weight back the Left which will involve some rotation as well and this initial rotation is driven by the left. Then someone can add right if they want to as I was still able to avoid double peaks when adding some right side and it can add some speed. But i am not trying to swing any harder, I just want more effortlessness
November 17, 2020
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James
Great video Chuck, again! Can an RST instructor comment on correct depth of the arms with this lower hands position for video reviewing ? I’ve been critiqued as having my arms too “deep” in my backswing and really struggle with keeping my arms from swinging too far behind me, which in turns causes me to push from the right side to get them back out front for contact... leading to casting and loss of spine angle. All works great in slow motion drills, but as soon as I add speed and the club ithis deep hands position creeps back into my swing. Thanks.
November 17, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. Elevation think more about height. We aren't advocating pushing the arms across the chest and getting stuck behind you. You don't want the hands getting too far behind the trail shoulder.
November 18, 2020
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Sean
great video and looking forward to trying it out! A problem I have is that when I attempt to 'deaden' the arms they seem to want to flop around. This I assume is because of incorrect sequencing in my swing. Is there a way to feel just the right amount of firmness in the arms? The push release was a bit confusing and seemed to conflict with the dead drill methodology, but I think this concept brings the two together. Keep up the amazing work Chuck!!
November 17, 2020
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Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
The Tape Drill video coming out later this week will help explain the push release and why. Your arms need to be fairly soft and get smashed against your chest as you begin to rotate your core and then as that rotation slows is when they get flung into impact. The rotation will keep the arm in place
November 17, 2020
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Sean
awesome thanks Chuck!
November 18, 2020
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Tom
Dumb question, but which video is the “clam shell video”. Can’t find one with that title.
November 17, 2020
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Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
Search clam and it will pull up first
November 17, 2020
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Ronald
Dead Drill 1 video 1
November 17, 2020
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Tom
Thanks!
November 18, 2020
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Peter
You have a gift. The way you teach golf is genius. The stackable concept allows learning small, simple moves which are easily incorporated into the swing. Thanks again.
November 17, 2020
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Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
Thanks Peter! I try hard!
November 17, 2020
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Michael
I have watched these videos with great interest, and have tried quite a few practice swings and they feel good. It seems that by keeping the swing more compact and trying to reduce the elevation, not only are the hands lower at the top of the backswing but also lower at impact creating the the sensation of extending the clubface through and beyond impact. ie not pulling upward too early, great. It feels powerful and can't wait to get out and try it. Unfortunately we are still in lockdown here in England. Mike
November 17, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Michael. Sorry to hear about lockdown. But, I like where you are headed with the swing.
November 18, 2020
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Stephen
Why are the hands lower at impact? Is it because you need steeper shoulders with shallower hands, which causes the hands to be lower at impact, or is it something else?
November 18, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Stephen. You will still be fully releasing so the hands will be slightly higher at impact than address just like in a normal swing. But, yes the steeper shoulder plane and the shallower approach angle.
November 18, 2020
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William
Loving this Mr. Quinton - will be putting in the hours over the grotty winter months in 'sunny' Stirling, Scotland. Funnily enough, towards the end of the 2020 season I was hitting it real solid by simply concentrating on the right elbow pit at address and posting up. All of this info was already there on the RST site. Sometimes 'you can't see the woods for the trees'!!! Thanks, William
November 17, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello William. Awesome and so true. Just trying different ways to get the message out and simplify for our members.
November 18, 2020
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Kevin
I like this feel / drill but feel at least for me the mistakes happen more in the takeaway prior to club shaft parallel to the target line. I would be curious to see how to take this from address to the top. I think you can keep the right arm too straight, too long which can lead to a late fold / overtravel at the top. Adding a little bend helps keep it soft but I worry some may add to much wrist hinge too early and let the club whip inside....love the left hip focus - something I'm working on
November 17, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Kevin. The takeaway remains the same. This is showing how little the trail arm does. You still don't want excessive flexion and roll early.
November 18, 2020
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Tony
Like the content. Fits with me. Thanks.
November 17, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Great Tony!
November 18, 2020
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Charl
I am excited about this video. At last you are starting to grasp the true fundamentals. 1. Hogan grip. You MUST have the club under the pad in your hand. 2. Shoulder turn and weight shift per RST system. 3. Really big wrist turn early in the backswing. Stick your right elbow in your side and roll the left hand over the right, so that your watch is pointing 90 degrees out in front of, by the time that your hands are at your right leg. 4. Keep the right arm close to your body, to make it a compact back swing. 5. Turn the arms off - they are merely a link between your shoulders (doing the turning) and your wrists, doing the hitting. 6. Shorten the backswing - do not lift the arms up. If you do this, there are no need to "shallow" the swing - it remains shallow from beginning to end. 7. Allow the wrists to cock a little at the end of the backwsing - creating lag. 8. Swing your arms through ( by clearing the right hip) as if you are going to throw a ball down to the ball. Chuck you are now entering an exciting stage of your research. What is sorely needed is to understand the role of the wrists in the (effortless) swing. If you search for articles on wrist movement you will find almost nothing, and the bits out there are useless. Please consider to set up a research on an effortless swinger, like the Louis Oosthuizen swing. Measure upper arm rotational speed. Measure wrist rotational speed. Do research on early and late cocking of wrists - you will find that early cocking is beneficial. The body remains quiet, the backswing is compact and the double-pendulum of wrist action multiplied by arm speed gives great clubhead speed. It ties in with your "relaxed arms" and your "low hands" approach. Enjoy the research - you are now getting onto something big.
November 17, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Charl. Glad to hear the excitement. However, confused by finally starting to grasp the true fundamentals with a couple of your points. With reference to #1. We've always taught lead grip more in the fingers with pad on top to help with release and cocking. And, trail wrist slightly hinged to help support the club and the top and down into a shallow plane. #3. We aren't advocating a really big wrist turn early in the backswing. #4 You aren't wanting to glue the trail arm to the body. You still want width. #7 Lag is a byproduct. Gradual set back and increase with change of direction. That hasn't changed. We will certainly continue to research the arms and the wrist no doubt and will have more information coming. Thanks for the suggestions.
November 18, 2020
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Diane
Superb video, and just what I need right now. Last time I played (before lockdown) I resorted to using 9-3 swing with a little wrist cock on quite a few shots (especially over a pond or bunker), or when I had to hit a reliable 100-120 yds. 9-3 was much more reliable, a bit shorter distance but so much more control. Of course in the 9-3, the arms are already shallowed out in the downswing, so although swing is not loaded as much as a correctly executed full swing, it's got the main engine parts working properly (shallow angle of attack and weight shift at the right tempo and sync). I will use the instructions in this video, to build up from the 9-3, which gives me a solid base to progress from to add more speed and power, while crucially retaining the solid contact and consistency that I have seen in the 9-3.
November 17, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Diane. Great. The 9 to 3 is my go to when trying to simplify my shots and get dialed in on efficient mechanics.
November 18, 2020
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nico
????????
November 17, 2020
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Dennis
This is a timely and very good video. After years of casting, coming over the top and tensing the right arm, this still remains my greatest challenge. Lately, I’ve been having one swing thought - to just focus on my right bicep remaining soft throughout the whole swing (and just let my thousands of drills do the rest). It seems to help. I’m interested in your thoughts of having a single focus being “soft right bicep from start to finish”.
November 17, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dennis. Muscles will still work and engage. But, if you can keep the arm soft with that notion. Should be fine. Some players may find they start to add too much flexion. A little bit subjective to the player.
November 18, 2020
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Bill
It looks like the position your right arm is in is very close to the position the arm is in during the down swing when the club is parallel to the ground.
November 17, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Bill. Could you elaborate more? I would be happy to answer. Just a little confused on back or down you are referring to parallel to the ground.
November 18, 2020
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Bill
At 6 minutes into the video Chuck trail arm position is close his side wrist back small amount of elevation when he puts a club in his hand it is parallel with the ground add waist bend and this looks very similar to the down swing position.
November 18, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Bill. Yes. The position will be very similar.
November 18, 2020
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Jeffrey
Part of the back swing is to push back the right hip; on the front swing we must push back the left hip farther than we did the right. When we shift our weight to the left to start the forward swing, we should sink into this so that we can use our mainly left leg to power the swing. I have been practicing this while swinging slowly and it is amazing how much speed is produced as long as I relax my arms and shoulders. Thanks for your great teaching!
November 17, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jeffrey. Awesome. Thanks for sharing the good news!
November 18, 2020
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Ken
That's my swing. Since my "accidents," my lead arm won't go very high. I've always gotten grief for having my trail arm elbow close to my body, but that's the only way I can take it back. According to this video, that seems to be okay. Yes?
November 17, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ken. You still don't want to have excessive flexion in the trail arm early, but keeping the arm closer and arms shallower is the goal. May be a great drill for you.
November 18, 2020
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Ken
Yeah, I don't have a lot of early trail arm flexion, so I'm okay there. I agree, this drill is something I can incorporate into my off-season training.
November 18, 2020
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WILLIAM
Here, the emphasis is pulling with the L hip (and having a passive R hip); however, in video on the Push Release, the emphasis was on a R hip push. I am confused!
November 17, 2020
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Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
The right hip can help Speed up rotation but only after the lead hip has done its job no matter how you release the club. The pressure shift back to the left and lead hip rotation always is paramount. Adding some right side is ok after that for those who wish to feel more right side help. I personally don’t do this but for others it can be very helpful
November 17, 2020
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Dale
It’s confusing to me, also. Unless Chuck is talking about some very subtle nuance, it seems to be this video (L hip pull) is more correct than the previous one. R hip push can work with high hands swing, but very difficult to execute with low hands swing as it tends to make you lose your spine angle.
November 17, 2020

I want you to think for a moment about the best shots you've ever hit in your life. Tell me one thing, what did you feel your arms doing during those shots? If you had to stop and pause this video and think about it, I want you to really go through this exercise because it's really important to help you understand what exactly I'm trying to do with rotary swing

For me, the best feeling in golf, and perhaps one of the best feelings in life is those effortless, pure golf shots, right out of the center of the face that fly straight and true and high and land so soft for me. That's why I play golf. I love hitting those shots and every time I've ever gone through this exercise to think about what it took to replicate those shots, I keep coming back to my arms and every single time I felt like my arms were very relaxed. And you may feel the same thing. Most people who I've talked to and gone through this exercise with say that they didn't feel their arms do anything. And to me, I think that's a huge part of the key, the secret ingredient to measuring and quantifying what these effortless shots really are, so that we can repeat more of them because that's really the funnest thing is peering those shots.

So if you think that having your arms being more relaxed, what's led to the more of those shots. Then we need to understand how we can keep replicating that by not doing so much with our arms and the back swing, because that's where almost everybody sets themselves off on the wrong foot. If you start building a lot of tension in your arms and specifically your shoulders, then all of a sudden, by the time you get to the top of your swing, you've got nothing to do, but to get rid of all this tension and it feels tight and it feels like a lot of work, you hit the ball, doesn't go anywhere. It's so frustrating yet the easier we swing, the less tension we have, the better shots we tend to hit.

So as I was doing my arms research with the force place this year, I really started wanting to create a formula and figure out the ingredients for success for hitting more of those effortless shots for everybody at all skill levels. And it kept coming back to the tension I had in the arms and the way that I use the arms in the swing. And that's where I started wanting to research the amount of elevation or how high your arms are in relationship to your shoulders at the top of your backs. Because your arms, if you have a lot of elevation swing, for those of you who aren't familiar with that concept, it's just how much your arms are moving up and down. So if I had a relatively flat shoulder turn and really high

Hands, that's a lot of elevation. Now I had to lift my arms up there. They didn't get up there magically, right? So the more I have to work to lift my arms up, the more difficult it is to turn that off and let arms naturally shallow in the downstream, because that is a critical part of the transition is that your arms, no matter how high they are, even if your arms are low, you're not hitting the ball from this position. They have to get back down and in front of your body. Now you can swing them down, push them down, pull them down, all sorts of different things you can do, but that doesn't lead to effortless, that effortless feeling of your arms being soft and then whipping through the shot right at that last second. That's the secret key to hitting those effortless golf shots. And in order to do that, I found that it was much easier.

The less elevation I had in my swing. Now, many of you guys remember my book from like 2005 where I used to teach a very, very low hands position. And I ran back to those times and looked at my old swings and I could see how my arms were so relaxed throughout the whole swing. And that was really a key reminder for me to feel, yes, if my arms are up high, it gives me a lot of leverage. I can swing my arms really fast. I have a lot of time to accelerate the hands, but it doesn't feel effortless. And the ball doesn't really go any further. If at all, it's so much harder to hit it more consistent when my arms and hands are doing so much in the swing. So I wanted to see if I lowered my hands a lot. Could I get back to hitting more of those effortless shots?

And could I see that instead of maybe one out of five, I could get three or four, even five out of five effortless feeling shots out of my golf swing. And the more that I shout out my hands, the more I relax them, the easier it got. So to make things simple, to help you hit more of these effortless shots, here's all I want you to start to think about that your arms need to do in the swing. It was focused on the trail arm, cause this is one of the ones where people, most people are trail, arm dominant, who are golfers of, if you're a right-handed golfer playing with right-handed clubs, you probably are pretty right-hand dominant. And that leads to so many swing flaws, you know, swinging over the top, casting the club that's all right, arm stuff. And really so much of that is due to just two things.

It's a lot of tension in the arms and hands and not using this lead hip to initiate everything, to get the swing started back down. So I'm going to talk about that part in just a moment, but let's first focus on the amount of elevation, because I think I can make your swing radically simpler. If you can just do that. If you can do this right here, just standing here right now. I want you to do this. That's the whole back swing with rotary swing. As far as your arms are concerned, now you can elevate more, but I'm suggesting that you don't, because I think you'll find it a lot easier to reduce the tension that you feel in your upper body and your shoulders and your arms and trying to muscle the ball and not getting any power out of it. If you can just do this,

A minimal amount of elevation, my elbow pit facing out my right wrist, hinged back. That's the whole swing and then a little bit of rotation. All right. Like I was going to clap my hands together. This is all I'm doing with my arms. Just letting it externally, rotate slightly that if I put that into the context, I'm not going to move my arm from what I just showed you. I'm just going to turn back. That's the whole back swing again, just this rotate back with my body may not look like much at first, but let me get a club in there. So I'll do the same thing. So now you can see elbow pit out, right? Wrist, hinged, back,

Little bit of external rotation as I go to the top, starting to look like a golf swing, right? A very shallow one in terms of the arms. So you need the steep in your shoulders. As you go back, we see so many golfers in our online lessons turn really flat with their shoulders. And this is devastating because now you've got to use your arms to try to get the club back to the ball. But if you get your shoulders, make sure that left shoulder goes down as the right shoulder goes back to rotate your shoulders, perpendicular to your spine. Now you can have this shallow or arm position, but still have plenty of leverage in your swing and really only have to move your arms. That much, that is going to make your swing radically simpler. Reduce the amount of tension that you feel in your shoulders. If you have a lot of tension in this trail shoulder, cause you lifted your arms up going back and instead of just doing this tiny little move, then you're going to want to heave the club over on the way down and swing over the top.

Take deep divots struggle with good contact. But from here, my arms barely need to shallow out at all. It makes everything so much simpler, so much more repeatable and puts you on the pathway to the giving you one of the key ingredients to hitting those effortless shots. So just work on getting this motion with your right arm, your trail arm in the backswing, and then just transport that to the top. Put a club in there and start feeling how you can make your backswing so much simpler and start working to reduce the tension in your arms. Now the second piece, once you have this tension removed in your swing and from your upper body, you need to use your lead hip. Remember the clam shell video, right? Where we talked about getting that left hip to go back into the chair. Almost everybody starts pushing off this right side way too much, way too early, drives their pelvis into the ball and they stand up the loser posture. And then of course, they got to use their arms to compensate.

If you get your lead hip to initiate everything this shift back over to the left and getting this left hip to go back out of the way, when you do that and you don't really do anything with the arms other than keeping them relaxed from the shallower position, my hands come right down to this perfect delivery position. I literally didn't have to do hardly anything to get the club into this perfect spot. Other than the clam shell video, just getting that left hip to go back, keeping my arms relaxed, passive don't fire them hard from the top, but it's a lot easier to not fire them. Hartford is hot when not tense because you didn't elevate them so much. So keep that lead arm across the chest a little bit longer. Don't try to start pulling your arms and separating your arm from your rib cage. Keep it back here and let your left hip do all the work as you shift back, keep it nice and relaxed and then let it rip through nice and easy for effortless shots. So put those two moves together. Really simple trail arm, work on the clamshell video and see if you can't reduce that tension and start hitting a lot more effortless golf.

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