Winter Golf Training Program - Setup

Our premium golf training program for winter months


Winter Training Series Article
Many golfers tend to “hibernate” and snooze on their golf swing during the winter months, but you could be missing some of the most effective and important practice time of the year.  As we have been preaching for years at RotarySwing.com , you don’t need to hit a bucket of golf balls to get meaningful results in your golf game.  In fact, massive improvement can be had by watching and practicing alongside our new WINTER GOLF TRAINING series.  

 
It’s important to know that every Golf Training Drill we are going to cover in this video can be done indoors with little more than the help of a mirror so you can watch yourself execute the proper movements and positions.  
If you follow along with our six week master course, we promise to have your golf swing revamped by the time you tee it up in the Spring.  All you need to is focus in on these core building block components and commit to using our program.  
Proper Golf Swing Set Up …  In order to get started on the right “foot”  you might need to brush up on the setup fundamentals of RST by visiting some of the core videos on stance, width and setup.   Building off of these elements, and focusing on proper axis tilt will set your swing up for a truly fantastic swing.  
Move Analysis: The goal of our first golf move is to virtually walk yourself into the proper golf setup by repeating your proper golf setup position at least 25 times.  This creates the necessary golf muscle memory that will make your swing effortless and repeatable.  
Lift your right heel and smash it down so you can feel the assertive move that is necessary to load up your hip.  While it might seem strange, but the key component of the drill is to understand the need for hip turn that compliments the turn of your torso.
To reinforce the movement, we recommend a medicine ball that will help with muscle memory.
From a down the line view, you should notice that you should be lifting your left heal and performing a direct lateral slide.  Again, the feeling and goal is to load up the hip and activate your hips a core.  
Keep in mind: the weight transfer we’re after with our “foot stomp” move is only an exaggeration that will teach your body which muscles need to be engaged in order to reach a proper and powerful golf takeaway.
Setup… Lift… Stomp… Rotate… These are the key terms and steps  that you need to focus on while practicing this video at home.
The Golf Exercise DRILL:  One Legged Lunge

As I mentioned in the introduction video, set up is where everything starts, and typically gets thrown off track. I'm not gonna go in depth on all of the fundamentals of set up, we've covered it in many many other videos, so if you're not familiar with all the set up fundamentals of RST, go back and watch those set up videos before embarking on this program. Because I'm going to skip along and move through some things very quickly. The goal here is for you to be able to follow along and get yourself into a perfect set up, and then weight shift every single time from here on out for the rest of your golfing life.

                So let's start out with how to do that. Again, not gonna go over the fundamentals of stance width, and weight shift, or balance, and all those things. You should already be familiar with those. So we're going to get in our proper set up, proper stance width. The main thing I want to focus on in getting you into a perfect set up every single time, is axis tilt. It is the foundation of a good set up. And it's so often overlooked and so often botched by so many golfers, that it causes so many problems ... There's no reason to not get it right.

                So what I want you to do, from your set up stance width, is every single time I want you to work on getting your hips to shift just a little bit to the left. As you watch here, it's about an inch and a half, two inch movement. As I do that, my upper body falls back. So what I want you to work on is starting from a perfectly upright spine, slide your hips to the left and let your right hand work under your left. Notice that as I do this, my hands are in the center of my chest and they move forward, cause they're not changing in relationship to my chest. So your goal with this move, is just walk yourself into a set up position, to where you are now set up behind the ball.

                Also note, that as I do this, my head, my eye line, tilts. Your whole body should fall back as your hips move forward. They're moving as a reaction to your hips. You're not trying to tilt your upper body. Just slide your hips forward. And keep working on getting this feeling of your weight settling into the left side, but also being counter balanced back to the right. So you're just going to try and do this about 25 times, and hold that position that you feel every single time. And feel how your right leg's kind of canted, left leg's a little more upright, and your upper body falls back.

                Now, as you're doing this, the goal is, what is the next move from this set up position. So we've done this 25 times, we're going to do this every single day so that this now becomes normal. But how do we get that first move going back, that's what we want to combine. Cause this is a pretty simple move, it's a static motion. You're just kind of getting set into this position to get everything set up, ready for take off here.

                The first thing I want you to add into this, is taking your right heel and lifting it up in the air, and smashing it down. And you'll notice as I do that, I'm letting my weight move to the right. I'm exaggerating this a little bit, my hips don't need to move that far. But what I'm trying to feel is an assertive move into the right hip so that I can start loading up on that hip as my first move. Which is what we're going to start working on with the weight shift. So we're going to combine getting set up, lifting the heel, stomping. And you'll also notice that as I'm stomping, I'm starting to let my body rotate. My belt buckle's turning and my buttons on my shirt are turning cause we're trying to get the feeling of loading up on this hip.

                One thing you may be asking yourself right now is, "Well I thought I wasn't supposed to move my hips at all during the take away, just my upper body." We teach people that, because most people do this immediately during takeaway. The reality is, your hips are moving during the take away. But because so many golfers just turn their hips and they don't get the separation from the upper and lower half, they don't focus on that a lot. So in this drill, again this is expecting that you already understand the fundamentals of RST, we're going to start to blend things together. So yes, my upper body is turning, it's turning more than my lower body, but my lower body's also turning during this initial weight shift. So as I lift and stomp, I'm not loaded up on my right hip and it's ready to go.

                Come down the line, and see the same thing. So I'm going to get into my set up. Notice that I've slid my hips to the left, and as I've done this, I haven't turned my shoulders, and I haven't cocked my hips this way, which we see all the time. It's just a direct lateral slide. I'm lifting my right heel, planting and turning. You'll notice as I do this, I'm just kind of going back to take away position, where my hands are about pocket height. As I'm doing this you'll also see that my hips are beginning to rotate. You can start to see my belt buckle here and my left knee coming out, indicating that my hips have begun to turn. The feeling, the goal here, is loading up on this right hip. Or if you're a lefty, your left hip. You want to start feeling that this leg is really loaded and driving into the ground so that you're starting to be able to activate these muscles in your hip. So that as you get loaded to the top, they're going to be able to fire on the way down.

                So if you want to take this another step further, you can work on it with a medicine ball. You're going to get into your set up position. Now I've slid my hips forward a little bit, lifting my right heel, stomping and turning. Now as I'm doing this, I'm starting to feel my weight shift. And you'll also notice that I'm letting my left heel come up a little bit. This is obviously an exaggeration of the drills, we're not wanting to necessarily lift our feet up in the swing all the time, but it is a great drill to help you force yourself transferring weight from one side to the other. So that's really what we're looking for here. So lift my heel, from set up position, lift, stomp. I want to stomp it in the ground so that I feel those muscles in my legs and hips activate and get myself half way back into take away.

                Down the line, I'm going to lift my heel, turn. Lift my heel, turn. So I'm just handing the medicine ball to you. And now I'm really feeling loaded in this hip, and starting to store up energy in my core. As I turn the medicine ball adds a little of resistance to it. Of course, we can do the same thing with a golf club. Get in our set up position, I'm going to slide my hips to the left. You'll notice that my right shoulder's lower than my left now. Gonna lift my heel, stomp, and turn. I'm doing this, club's just going half way back. I'm not doing anything with my hands or arms, I'm just turning, getting myself into a really good, wide, powerful, loaded up take away right from the first move.

                So your goal is to try and do these exercises, just this movement, for 15 to 20 minutes a day, nothing else. And don't just rifle through them, that's not going to do you any good. You need to be really focusing on what it is you're feeling as you do this movement. And what we're trying to feel, our primary motion, is weight shift, and drive, and activation in that right hip with some rotation from a good set up position. So set up, lift, stomp. As you start getting good at this, you can start making at stomp smaller and smaller. So that instead of it being this big lift where you really have to lift it a lot to really feel it. As you get more skilled, what you're going to notice is that you can just kind of lift your foot up in your shoe, you don't have to lift your heel way up in the air. And then eventually it just becomes more of a natural movement where you don't have to lift your feet up at all.

                But, for a while, it's a good exercise. Cause it kind of gets you from being stuck and frozen over the ball. Kind of let your weight move back and forth from one heel to the other. Keep doing that, and as you get better, it just becomes more of a natural little ... Kind of a swing start guide to help you load the right muscles during the take away.

                Now if you really struggle with feeling this right hip, what I want you to do, is I want you to do a one legged lunge. And you can use your golf club to help you kind of stay balanced here. So I'm going to show you what I want you to feel here. So I want you to try and get your leg in a vertical position directly over your ankle. And what I want you to do, is without moving your knee back and forth, keep it right where it is, try and lunge up from this position. So notice that my leg is gonna stay in the same spot. I'm not doing this, I'm not getting way out over my toes, I'm just lunging up and down from this spot. And you won't be able to go full range, but you'll get close. And I'm just doing this on my right leg right now cause what I'm trying to feel is the activation in my right hip. Those muscles that you feel doing the lunge are the exact same ones you want to feel half way back during your back swing.

                So you can add those lunges, try to do both sides to balance it out. Add those little lunges to help you feel activation in your right hip if you struggle with that. Again, 15 to 20 minutes of set up. We're going to get into our set up position, lift the right heel, stomp, rotate half way back. 

 

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Kevin
Hi Craig - I just watched the latest swing review Chuck posted that discussed loading the right glute quickly in the backswing. He talks a lot about being “light and quick” and unloading the lead foot in the backswing. I know swing catalyst talks about having 55-60% of your weight on the lead foot at setup to help push off / rock into the trail foot and the lighten the lead foot to get into it easier in the downswing. What are your thought on setting up with more weight on the lead foot and pushing off to get into the trail fooot?
February 15, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Kevin. Chuck will have some more details on this topic coming out soon. I don't want to deviate too much from his new findings. With that said a little bit lead side at setup is fine. But, it may complicate things to think about push off of left onto right versus just kinda lift and stomp right foot.
February 16, 2021
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Fred
Question about shaft lean at set up. I felt much more compression on impact when I add just a bit of shaft lean at set up. Just a slight tilt of the shaft tword my lead side thinking that is where I want it at impact, is that acceptable?
August 17, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Fred. Ideally, you don't want lean at address. Take a look at Should You Have Forward Press at Setup and Golf Grip Checkpoint Tips Videos for proper placement.
August 18, 2020
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Fred
I noticed when others hit I can hear the spin as the ball flys. I dont get that from my irons does that mean I'm not hitting down on the ball?
August 18, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Fred. Not necessarily hitting down on the ball, but you are missing compression somewhere. It sounds like you may be hitting at a little more of a positive angle of attack. Take a look at How to Get Perfect Shaft Lean Video.
August 18, 2020
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Jaleel
Hi Craig. While trying the heel stomp … I inadvertently tried going back by stomping the ball of my right foot instead and using that to push the right glute around as the weight in my trail foot went from ball to arch to ankle/heel to complete the takeaway … then the obliques and shoulders worked up the body to turn and take me to the top of the backswing. Is this acceptable … or does this constitute a push rather than a pull to get me started? Initially anyway … because the obliques and right shoulder were definitely pulling. Also I noticed a response below suggesting that after the takeaway it’s the coil from the shoulders that will help pull the trail hip around … which sounds like a top to down sequence of muscle activations … whereas I always thought that one works ground up … meaning; foot - glute - obliques - shoulder blades. Thanks. Your help is greatly appreciated.
February 13, 2020
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jaleel. I would be careful about using the ball of the foot as the trigger point. Ideally, that stomp should me going more towards the ankle joint/heel. If you put you on a force plate you would see the weight kinda does move a little from front to back (ball to heel). But, we need to shy away from turning the ball of the foot into your primary balancing joint in the backswing. Which is why the ankle/heel is a much safer trigger. The shoulder rotation will pull the hips open. We prefer starting the swing with weight shift and the pulling of the trail shoulder will aid you in opening the hips. The swing is still starting from the ground up. Take a look at My Golf Backswing Secrets.
February 13, 2020
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Jaleel
Watched the backswing secrets video ... ingrained your reply ... got it ... thanks - much appreciated.
February 17, 2020
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Ronan
Hi, This looks like a great drill, but its rather different than the "five minutes to the perfect takeaway/backswing" in which we are looking for the best position for the club to be versus letting the club be positionned by the weight shift and rotation. What would be the best way to practice the backswing? I play off 7 but have a poor backswing (left side dominant) and i'm coming over the top a lot, i'm trying to find the best way to practice, and i have complete step 1 in the 5 steps system Ronan
January 2, 2019
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ronan. Both drills (5 Min and Winter Back) are great at creating a proper backswing. Some players like all the nuts and bolts technique wise. Others like a more simplified version to hit the same position. I would work some on the 5 Minutes to get the idea and feeling of the exact positioning. And, use the above video to help blend the swing from the ground up to calm over thinking about the swing.
January 2, 2019
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richard
I have been doing the drill ,swinging the left arm only, feels good, getting a nice swish through impact and beyond when I add the right arm, I feel the club slowing down thru impact, and a feeling of some restraint from right shoulder ...
October 30, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Richard. The body will decelerate and the club will accelerate. You move slow as the the club moves fast. You might be having a little more sensation that the hands are slowing to allow the club too snap. When adding the trail it will tend to restrict the free flowing movement of lead arm only. Vital that the trail arm remains light to maintain the proper pulling and release. You want to keep the trail shoulder from pushing through and it may feel like the swing gets really wide through impact. The slowing nature, or restriction feeling from the trail side is natural.
October 30, 2018
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T David
In the first part of this video, Chuck mentions the slight hip bump to the left on setup. And mentions more weight on the left side. So, should the normal golf swing begin with more weight on the left (70%), rather than a balanced 50/50?
February 26, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dave. A normal golf swing should start 50/50.
February 26, 2017
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Curt
I just saw a performance review section on the website. How does that work? Mine has not changed through 4 reviews
December 24, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Curt. Some players like performance reviews and other's do not. In your next review tell your instructor that you would like an updated performance rating. He will be able to update it appropriately.
December 26, 2016
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Steve
Chuck, I'm the 64 year old who recently commented that I couldn't feel anything in my saggy old glutes. You suggested doing lunges. I'm guessing you included the comment about lunges in this video for we older folks. Sage advice. Toward that end, the other day I blew the dust off of a P90X video I had not used in quite some time, and did their lunge workout. Apparently I still have some muscles in that region, because they hurt like hell now. I bring this up because while I had been doing some lunges on my own, I wasn't really feeling any results. Put another way, what I was doing wasn't really a workout. I would recommend, especially for your older clients, that they find a way to make their lunge efforts worthwhile, rather than doing a few reps and thinking that's all they need. If you don't feel some burn while doing it, and some soreness afterward, it's probably not accomplishing much.
December 5, 2016
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Michael
Chris; Can the shoulder glide of the trail shoulder be the catalyst that initiates the weight shift. I'm finding if I focus on a smooth shoulder glide I feel like my weight has moved to the right and began to load to the right. My arms, wrists and hands are very passive so as not to influence an improper takeaway.
December 5, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Michael. The shoulder blade won't force you to transfer weight. But, pulling the shoulder blade properly will eventually start to pull the trail hip. More than likely with a good pull you are starting to feel the coil against the lower half.
December 5, 2016
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Lee
Hi, this video froze at 5:35. alao, is the mirror you offer appropriate for the drills. Lee Besen
December 4, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Lee. The video is working on my end. If you continue experiencing the problem. Please contact Customer Service. You can use the mirror we offer for the drills. A larger/flat mirror may be easier though.
December 5, 2016
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Caleb
In the setup video you mention a "few degrees" of axis tilt and a straight line from the left leg to the shoulder line. Is there an actual amount of degrees that we should be looking for or enough to get the straight line?
October 25, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Caleb. Enough to get the straight line will suffice.
October 25, 2016
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Mary
I love this new. video set. Was beginning to feel overwhelmed with all the videos and not sure what I should be focusing on, so I recently cancelled now you have presented this new set, I am going to rejoin, when my membership finishes n 2 days time. Thank you again Chuck for being such a great mentor!!!
October 25, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Mary. Glad to hear you will be back. We are working on things behind the scenes to help with not getting overwhelmed by the volume of our videos.
October 25, 2016
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Edward
Hi. I want to make sure I get off on the right basis doing my set up/takeaway/backswing reps. If I understand Chuck correctly - I press with my right heel, which transfers my weight and starts both my hips and upper body turning into the takeaway. Am I correct in assuming that the hips then stop turning at say 45 degrees but the obliques/shoulders keep turning and this is the correct sequencing of the coil in the backswing - rather than obliques turning first then hips? Thanks for any guidance, and sorry if this is already covered in other videos.
May 21, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Edward. The press or stomp will help transfer the weight. Typically, you will pull your trail shoulder in the backswing which will pull the hips to 45 degrees or less in the backswing. But, this drill is designed to help get players shifting and allowing for some hip rotation. In the full swing the coil from the shoulders will help pull the trail hip around.
May 21, 2016
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Edward
Thanks - just one more question to clarify this - Is it just the trail shoulder pulling in the backswing or is it the right obliques first, then the trail shoulder taking over? Maybe that's too much detail, but the two different methods seem to produce different feelings when i try them. Thanks for any advice
May 22, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Edward. You are using both sets of muscles. In the beginning of the swing while training you will probably feel more of the obliques taking the club away versus the trail shoulder. The more advanced and the longer the swing gets the more the trail shoulder will feel like it is doing the work.
May 22, 2016
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Lance
Does the hip bump for axis tilt preload some weight to the lead side? I have been trying to get the proper feeling for weight transfer and have been pressing the back heel down on the inside of my ankle as I start the shoulder blade guide. After watching this video it seems that the hip bump may be a sleight weight shift in itself. It is challenging to synchronize the upper body pull move with the lower body weight shift move into a single swing thought. The hip bump seems like a tension point that releases as I start the take away. Can you speak to this? Thanks
March 15, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Lance. When you add hip bump and axis tilt. They should negate the feeling of weight transfer. You want to be 50/50. Hip goes slightly towards target and upper half falls slightly away. Creating an even distribution. You can think rotate and shift, or shift (to trigger) then start rotating. If you are having a hard time doing it at once. You don't need to make it over complicated. The goal is to have the good rotation and weight in the trail ankle joint--glute at the end of the takeaway. Personally, I start rotating and pulling with my trail shoulder, then feel a sit/load into the glute.
March 15, 2016
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Lance
Thanks Craig. So the setup is 50/50 - good Should I feel some tension in my setup as a result of the hip bump? I am thinking that releasing that tension is what I combine with the start of the rotation. Also I find it helpful to consciously resist any hip turn as long as I can into the backswing. It seems that the shoulder rotation coils completely and then pulls/rotates the hips in a sequential feeling although I know the hips do start sooner. So my last question is about the start of the downswing - should there be a feeling of tension in the hips that is released as the weight shift back to the lead side begins? I am trying to develop a swing thought to begin the downswing that doesn't involve the arms at all since Chuck(ie) says "the arms do nothing" in the transition. I guess I am getting to the point where the movements are getting engrained but I am sometimes unsure about how to focus mentally on the proper triggers to find repeatable tempo and maintain sound fundamentals.
March 15, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Lance. You should be fairly relaxed after bump. You might feel some tension if you have never setup in this way before. But, that will subside. Yes, the trail shoulder blade will help pull the hips as you feel when making sure you don't consciously (rotate the hips) of the ball. When shifting in the downswing you will feel the weight shift and glutes engage. Not overly tense.
March 15, 2016
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Lance
Hi Craig In your reply before last you ended with a reference to the feeling of sitting into the glute on the trail side as the backswing begins. Does this sitting happen as a result of additional knee flex? I know there is a video about sitting into the lead side to start the downswing. Do you recommend any videos for the trail side sitting feeling? Thanks
March 17, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Lance. Take a look at the Weight Shift Part 2 and the Load the Right Glute for Stability and Safety. Unless you really struggle with engaging the glute. You shouldn't have much of an increase in additional flexion.
March 17, 2016
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Yuefeng
In setting up, you talked about axis tilt but I noticed in shifting weight to the right (stamping into the right) that tilt angle seems to be lost, so what's the point of having the tilt at setup then subsequently losing it? Thanks.
March 7, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Yuefeng. If you are losing tilt as you shift, then something is moving incorrectly. The tilt will be maintained as you shift into the trail glute. Take a look at the Weight Shift Video Part 2 to help. Also, RST Necktie Drill to maintain all the way to the top.
March 7, 2016
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Yuefeng
Thanks Craig. Please correct me if I'm wrong. The reason why I made such comment was that I noted in the video, Chuck slided the hips to the left to get the tilt and then during weight shift his hips moved a bit to the right. I reckon the tilt angle would change if his head stays put during weight shift. It seems to me the only way to maintain the initial tilt angle is for the head and upper body to make the same shift to the right as the hips.
March 7, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Yuefeng. When you add axis tilt (it is a bump of the hip towards the target and slight increase in axis away from the target). The head will move slightly when shifting into the trail side. The move is very small to load the trail glute properly. You don't want to try and glue your head to a fixed position. When you shift the whole body will go with it. The rotation of the trail hip will help you stay away from sway or excessive head movement.
March 7, 2016
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Yuefeng
This is very clear. Thank you.
March 7, 2016
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Yuefeng
In the setup, people talked about the Y position of the arms and club. I was always wondering if this is meant for a big "Y" or a small "y" where the left arm is more in line with the club? Also, at setup do we need to decrease the loft by moving the hands closer to the left leg? Thanks.
March 7, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Yuefeng. There are different ways of deciphering the proper "y" at setup. I would prefer the lead arm not be in perfect alignment with the club. Take a look at the Grip Tips Video to help with arm positioning. There is no need to add excessive forward press at setup.
March 7, 2016
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Yuefeng
Noted. So it's ok to have some natural forward press so the arm-club position is closer to being a small "y" as opposed to an evenly distributed big "Y", correct?
March 7, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Yuefeng. I prefer the "Y". But, when you add tilt and put the trail hand lower on the club. You can have some natural "y" or forward lean.
March 8, 2016
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Robin
these videos are great! could you please explain what effect proper axis tilt has on your position at impact.
February 7, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Robin. Take a look at the Importance of Axis Tilt Video. Without proper tilt it will affect your launch angle and capability of being in NJA at impact.
February 7, 2016
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Robin
Thanks Craig, I'll haveto work on this. It seams to make it tougher to shift to the left.
February 8, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Robin. Take a look at the Perfecting Impact Bonus Video and the How to Swing from the Ground Up to help with the shift while maintaing tilt.
February 8, 2016
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Jerome
Hello RST teal , before I join RST members, a few weeks ago and work 5 mn setup and takeaway and now this video i used to try not to move, or move very little my hips knees and legs trying to be very stable, Why , if not i was not turning relay my upper body and doing what i think you call sway instead at the downswing. Now after trying your drills for 2/3 weeks I understand much better but it has a side effect : i am moving too much my head to the left and then back. Any idea how to minimize this which is new for me ?
January 9, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jerome. Take a look at the Level Shoulders Drill. (If Right Handed Swinger). When you are shifting. You might be adding a little push/slide with the hips increasing the secondary axis tilt into impact. Causing the head to fall back more at impact.
January 9, 2016
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William
Good Evening all @ Team RST! The video and Chuck are, as always, top quality. Without coming across a tad too pedantic - what weight of Medicine Ball do you recommend for RST excercises? William
December 20, 2015
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Steven (Certified RST Instructor)
William- I wouldn't use that heavy of a weight, otherwise you could lose balance, injure yourself and or just perform the drill incorrectly. Use a light-medium weight enough where you can feel the weight shift and be able to perform the drills correctly without feeling like its out of control.
December 21, 2015
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William
Cheers Steven - exactly what I was thinking, but just in case! William
December 21, 2015
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Steven (Certified RST Instructor)
Any time William. It's about control.
December 21, 2015
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Daniel
does the axis tilt that causes my hands to go forward , doesn't that cause my club face to change also from square to face pointing to the right? Dan
December 20, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Daniel. The trail hand will be lower on the club. When you add a little of the tilt. Don't think about it as adding forward press, but balancing the fact that the trail hand will be lower than the lead hand. The hands should be vertical at setup. Take a look at the Fixing Your Setup Video.
December 21, 2015
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Edward
Hi. I'd love some advice to clear up a question on axis tilt and how it works through the backswing. It is subtle, but I think important so here goes... If I axis tilt at set up my right (trail) shoulder is below my left shoulder. On the conclusion of the backswing I presume I need to end up with my left shoulder below my right? If so, is this achieved by 1) tilting just my upper body (left shoulder) towards the ball during the backswing whilst keeping the set up tilt in my lower spine, 2) reversing the entire axis tilt that i had at set up or 3) by a dropping of the left hip and raising of the right hip as the left knee goes out and the right leg straightens on the backswing, whilst the actual axis tilt stays constant (although in the videos it actually looks like the left hip stays level or even higher than the right through the backswing). or 4) something else I am missing! Thanks so much for any guidance anyone can offer.
December 8, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Edward. I think you are making it a little more complicated than need be. We all do . The spine angle at address and forward hinge from the hips will determine the shoulder plane. The axis tilt allows us to rotate around the spine properly. Proper rotation around the spine from a hinged forward position makes the shoulder plane a touch flatter, but the left will still a little below the right.
December 8, 2015
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Colin
I think I have a problem when shifting my weight in that I feel that the natural way to shift my weight to the right seems to be to move my hip to the right (which I have just bumped to the left). If I try to maintain my hip position so that I have axis tilt I don't feel that my weight is transferred. I suppose I'm asking how to properly transfer without losing axis tilt (without stomping)?
December 2, 2015
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Colin
Thank you!
December 3, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Colin. Stand straight up and down in golf stance width. If you were to rock back and forth between your right foot and left foot you would be transferring your weight. Do that while not picking up either foot and try to accomplish 80-90% of your weight on either side. You should see that you don't have to move very far to place the weight on one leg or the other. All we are looking for is to have the weight transfer. Your whole body moved to shift the weight without bumping of the hip. Don't over complicate it by trying to place the hip perfectly. The weight goes to the right and back to the left with ease.
December 2, 2015
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Colin
Thank you!
December 3, 2015
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Johan
This is a really nice video, and has helped me a lot with the start of my backswing. I have a technical question in regards to it. In the beginning you create a "reverse K" position, for lack of a better expression. Then the first thing that happens as you stomp down your foot is that your (right) knee moves an inch or two to the right. I understand that the right knee is supposed to be quiet in the backswing (laser beam drill) but here it starts with a move and then from there stays quiet? Can you expand on this a little bit?
November 30, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Johan. The external rotation of the trail knee is more a movement from the lifted or prepped position for the stomp. In the real swing you won't need to externally rotate the trail leg to get stacked.
November 30, 2015
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Johan
I kind of enjoy doing the little move with the trail knee, i find it a nice starter to my thing. I saw the '5 Minute Golf Setup w/ Weight Shift' video in which the phenomena of moving the knee is explained as ok/proper. So I'm a little confused. Can I do it or will it affect my swing somehow down the line? On another note, thank you for your swift and accurate responses Craig!
November 30, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Johan. Thanks for the compliment on our turn around. Using the weight shift or a touch of the trail knee movement will not inhibit your progress at all. Your goal will be to maintain the knee flexion and load the trail glute. There are tour players that use the little shift or movement to help trigger the swing and stay tension free.
November 30, 2015
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Craig
Do you have a recommendation for the weight of a medicine ball? Also I have been thinking that Jordan Speith has a forward press but it after looking at this video may be his lateral weight shift forward before back swing. Great starter motion I think so you are not totally static.
November 29, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Craig. You don't want something you feel you have to heave to get to the trail side. 5-10-15 pounds should be sufficient. There are lots of tour players that use their weight shift as the overall trigger to start the swing.
November 30, 2015
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Craig
Thanks. Thought they were all doing a forward press but it's a lateral shift. There is definitely a difference. Set up training video put it together for me.
November 30, 2015
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Johan
25 times a day. Should I redo the whole setup over and over again 25 times. Or should I simply stand straight on both legs, do the hip bump and add the trailing hand, then go back to neutral and repeat 25 times?
November 27, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Johan. If you have mastered a good part of the setup. You don't need to redo the entire sequence.
November 27, 2015
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Johan
Cool, is it advisable to stick to doing this drill with just one iron, or move through the bag adressing all clubs?
November 27, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
You could do a few with a driver. But, I wouldn't worry about working through the entire bag. Your brain will start to gather the motion you are trying to ingrain.
November 27, 2015
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gordon
This winter video has given me new impetus to work on axis tilt and the hip-and -hands shift at address simplify the implementation. With the driver axis tilt is greater, and of even more importance. Can you explain for me what should happen to the driver club face when making the hip-and-hands shift? To date I have preferred keeping the driver head mid-stance at address, which means either club face will rotate open or, if kept perpendicular to the target line, will deloft. Which result is correct? Or is it advisable to move the driver head up towards the teed-up ball at address to counteract this face realignment problem? Best regards, Gordon.
November 26, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gordon. I would move it more towards the teed-up ball at address. The face will always be rotating. You don't want to cause any delay in the reaction.
November 27, 2015
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Jason
regarding the trail elbow pit at address: I've noticed if I make sure it is pointed away from me at address, the club tends to be straight down the line on my end takeaway position. on the other hand, if the elbow pit points 45 degrees forward of me or generally less than straight away from me, the end takeaway has the club behind me from down the line. Am I correctly identifying cause and effect?
November 22, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jason. You don't want to force or lock the trail elbow in the setup, but the pit needs to be pointed away from the body. Yes, it sounds like the proper diagnosis. Take a look at the Right Elbow Pit Video.
November 23, 2015
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Philip
Hi Rotary Swing, I've been working away at the setup drill. Playing recently one of my partners noticed I tended to get shut at address after hip bump/axis tilt. Any thoughts on how to avoid this (when practicing I use a tour stick for alignment so not so much of a problem)? Thanks
November 18, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Philip. It sounds like you are rotating when adding hip bump/tilt. Make sure you don't over due the move and rotate when adding tilt. Or, hold a club vertical down the chest. You can see this in the Importance of Axis Tilt Video.
November 18, 2015
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Ralph
Thanks for all the great training videos. On this first winter drill, once you do the trail heel stomp, what percentage of weight would now be on the trail foot (I know we do 50-50 percent at setup) and would that percentage remain or increase as you get to the top of the backswing. Thanks again.
November 16, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ralph. 80% of the weight should be shifted into the trail leg by the end of the takeaway. There shouldn't be much more load bearing added after that to the top.
November 16, 2015
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michael
hi, thanks for this strainig program, it sounds great; one question: should'nt i keep the spinangle (from the setup position) during the backswing; i'm not quite clear about it, when i look at the video, especially down the line - it would bring the club further back, increase, the way to the impact position und keeping the back towards the aim during the weight transfer would be easier, best michael
November 16, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Michael. You want to maintain the spine angle. Adding Axis Tilt shouldn't inhibit this. Importance of Axis Tilt Video.
November 16, 2015
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Justin
Hey Guys, Looking forward to this series of videos and working on my swing over the winter! It seems like axis tilt continues to creep away from me, so this is a great place to revisit. I've been working on the drills that Chuck outlined above. However, my right side lower back and upper hip both feel strained (painful) when performing the takeaway with proper axis tilt. Could I be doing something wrong? Thanks again for your help.
November 15, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Justin. You might be over doing the move. Make sure you are starting 50/50 weight distribution and not forcing the shift too much. You want to maintain the tilt and load the glute. Make the transition to the trail side a little softer and stay relatively relaxed with the other muscles.
November 15, 2015
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Justin
Thanks Craig. This was a big help. I started working on keeping my weight distributed 50/50. However, after a few practice rounds, I subconsciously started adding more weight to my front foot and keeping it there with my foot firmly planted - with very little weight transfer. I started compressing the ball much better with great ball flight. I know weight transfer is a good thing, but has always been my crutch. Is it bad to keep more weight on your front foot? Similar to S&T? I'd hate to change gears now, but this move seems to really work for me. I can send you a video if it helps? thanks
January 22, 2016
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Justin. It would be best to check in a review. However, you can stay a little stacked on the front foot. We allow some older players to do so. The limiting factor is weight transfer helps with lag due to momentum change and some power.
January 22, 2016
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Jason
I think the takeaway weight shift is something I've been missing. I'm worried about causing my head to move too far off of the ball or creating too much body swaying. when I stand at address and move the weight over alone, I notice the club moving back a little from behind the ball: is that supposed to happen? Can I just do that? move the weight to my right heel first for a second or two, and then start rotating? I feel that way I can contain the sway a little.
November 15, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jason. You can use the shift as the trigger to your swing.
November 15, 2015
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thomas
When I do the reverse K setup I find it actually harder to rotate my shoulders. If I rotate my shoulders with a tilted spine - my left shoulder is "moving" more down towards my right leg (instead of a horisontal shoulder rotation with a straight spine). This makes it almost impossible for me to do a full shoulder rotation and this make me wonder if I do something wrong since you say it should be easiar to rotate with a tilted spine?
November 12, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Thomas. It sounds like you are doing something incorrect. Are you pulling with the trail shoulder to rotate and not pushing with the lead? Take a look at the Importance of Axis Tilt to make sure the setup is correct. If you continue to struggle. Upload a swing for review and one of our instructors will be happy to take a look.
November 12, 2015
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James
I did this drill today and then went to the range to hit a few balls with it. Getting awesome compression and fizz off the clubface. One big problem though is that everything was going in pull draw fashion from 8 to 7 to 4 iron. Regards James
November 12, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello James. Make sure you shift back to the lead side properly. Don't hang back on the trail side and let the trail arm start controlling to much face rotation.
November 12, 2015
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Andrew
If I am in the perfect setup position with the proper axis tilt then it feels to me that I already have a lot of weight on the trail side. If I maintain axis tilt during backswing I can really feel glutes load without any hip bump as I am already stacked over trail side. Hip bump really throws off my timing - is it really necessary if I am getting the proper load without doing it?
November 11, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Andrew. The goal is to load the trail glute while maintaining proper axis tilt. At setup I still want the weight 50/50 in distribution. If you don't require the stomp or bump into the glute to start loading it and you can achieve with just a subtle shift. That is okay.
November 12, 2015
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Nigel
I too have difficulty with the "axis tilt". it appears to disappear when you move to the right!
November 11, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Nigel. If you are losing axis tilt when you move to the right, then you are bumping the hips backwards and not weight shifting. The whole body will shift and load into the trail glute. The hip bump from setup position doesn't bump back to neutral. Take a look at the Weight Shift Video Part 2.
November 11, 2015
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Jian
Hi, thank you for this winter series video programme, it is a great that we can practice and improve without have to stand at North Pole. My question is relating to the shoulder tilt during the backswing. During the takeaway/shoulder rotation, how much the left shoulder should tilt towards the ground ( right shoulder upward to sky)? I know this is linked to the spine angle, but I guess not completely. Thanks. Jian
November 11, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Jian. It is linked to spine angle. Even though the trail blade is moving down and in towards the spine. The spine angle and tilt won't change. You aren't trying to level out the shoulders going back. The down and in motion is just the actual move the blade has to perform to rotate and pull the shoulder back (create rotation). Take a look at Chri's Latest Video Russell Knox Setup and Rotate.
November 11, 2015
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Thomas
When I do the hip bump, I find that I have very little room left to make a shift to the right without going past my hip line at address. Am I not balanced at address?
November 10, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Tom. You might be over doing the bump/tilt. Take a look at the Importance on Axis Tilt. The bump isn't a big shift weight or body movement.
November 11, 2015
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terry
An instructor I once worked with suggested that I hit balls by lifting my right heel before I started my turn, since getting turned into my ride side was a problem. I was amazed at how effective the drill was in getting me into the ride side and hitting more solid shots. Great drill Chuck is suggesting that can be taken to the range.
November 10, 2015
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Terry. Thanks for the post! Glad you like the drill.
November 10, 2015

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