Patrick Reed - Right Foot Brake

Congrats to the young and always exciting Patrick Reed, for winning the 2015 Hyundai Tournament of Champions. In this new video, I will show you a great way to get over those hip spinning problems that have left you frustrated round after round. I will also show a couple of great checkpoints to help you maintain your spine angle through the entire golf swing and get you back to playing consistent golf. I'll show how to use the lower body properly in your downswing and then control it during the release by using your trail foot as a brake!

  • Sit into the trail side glute when working into the top of the backswing to help maintain spine angle. 
  • Shift the hips to the lead side and post up. 
  • Use the trail foot as a brake for the hips so that cannot spin open in the hitting area. 
  • Release the club

64x64
T David
Great video. I have been focusing on my right foot and knee position through the downswing. As the ground force is applied to the right foot at the top of the swing, at what point does this pressure move to left side?
June 8, 2017
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Dave. You will still have some glute engagement in the trail side when shifting to help stabilize the hips. But, as you get into the release position is when you will feel the vast majority on the lead side.
June 8, 2017
64x64
Brian
While working on the belt buckle drill, I started noticing something in my swing that appears to be similar to what Patrick Reed does. It's not quite as obvious in this video, but watch his hip rotation during the backswing and transition. I notice that he restricts the hip rotation almost at the completion of the backswing, but then there is one extra bit of hip rotation that triggers the downswing. I noticed this very subtle move in my swing when working on the belt buckle concept of trying to point the buckle back behind the ball when starting the downswing.
August 20, 2015
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Brian. I don't think you need to manually train a move like this, but I see what you are saying relative to Patrick's swing.
August 20, 2015
64x64
Anthony
Chris, in the video pratice points you use the term "post up". Can you explain what that means, thanks
March 9, 2015
64x64
Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Anthony, posting up is just an expression for creating max stability in the lead leg in a neutral joint alignment fashion. It also relates to once you have shifted the weight to the lead side and stabilized it, you are pushing the lead ankle into the ground and clearing the lead hip, thus giving you the term posting up. Hope that helps.
March 9, 2015
64x64
Christian
guilty hip spinner. I just finished getting to the top correctly and now (with this video) I should be able to squat and keep my spin angle. I am looking forward to uploading a video with my improvements.
January 23, 2015
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Christian. We look forward to taking a look. Use that trail foot and squat correctly. Start getting good snap at the ball!
January 23, 2015
64x64
Peter
I like this guy! He's not a lanky, willowy McElroy. He looks like me! A little tank. Your description of his stability, the use of his big hip/gluteal muscles is made more apparent by your attention to his right foot. I'd decided that stabilizing the right heel,with a little squat, was a great way for me to slow the hips. For now, however, I'm sitting on my gluteals, and drooling over your continued study of the Rotary Tour. I'm slow, but not stupid. I'll catch up...just as soon as I get these damned braces off (not the teeth kind). pk
January 21, 2015
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Peter. Apologize for the later reply. It's nice to see someone of "typical" build using good fundamentals for us normal folks. No need to be Arnold to have a good golf swing.
February 17, 2015
64x64
Maciej
Patrick strange business with the left foot is because of his left knee which he has bent in impact. And his body instead on rotating on pelvis joint is trying to rotate on knee. That is what I see.
January 15, 2015
64x64
Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Maciej -- His left foot his strange for sure. His weight does move to the lead side pretty drastically in the downward move. He is leveraging the ground which is pushing the left foot so hard into the ground that it becomes almost weightless in the hitting area. The point of the video was to see how he uses the trail foot to stall the hips. Sorry I did not make that more clear. Look at how Bubba Watson hits his driver. He is up on his toes and almost airborne at times. Does this mean he has not shifted his weight to the lead side? Just trying to give a good comparison here for further clarification.
January 16, 2015
64x64
Don
Bye the way.........I was a big hip spinner!
January 15, 2015
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Gotcha. We all were at one point in time!
January 16, 2015
64x64
Don
I have self-critiqued myself to others by saying that part of my problem is that I have two swings and I tend to switch back and forth if my timing is off on a certain day. (Usually when I haven't been playing much and try to come back out after a long layoff.) The one swing I use is almost identical to Reed's swing. At address I put 90% of my weight on the right foot and try to keep it there as long as possible. As my hips rotate to start the swing my weight just naturally shifts to the left side, but it only feels like I have a 50/50 weight distribution at impact and only completely shifts to the left side after my follow through passes the 90 degree point on my release. To me the total swing feels more "armsy" but my results, as long as I don't try to swing too hard, is unbelievably straight and long. Many times I have demoed the two shots for my sons-in-laws while playing a practice round by hitting two balls off of the tee. On the first shot I use the Reed swing and swing smooth and easy. On the second shot I shift my weight early and totally swing almost as hard as possible. When I connect on both, the second swing goes twice as high and stays in the air much longer, but the distance between the two distances are usually within 3 yards of each other unless I have a strong tailwind or headwind. I have this "hit it as hard as I can mentality" as long as I can control it so I don't play the Reed-type shot very often, unless my timing gets off during a round when I am swinging harder. I agree with the previous comments that Reed cannot pick up his left foot if he has his weight fully shifted left! So which should I play?
January 15, 2015
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Don. I don't want you presetting the weight on the trail side and then starting the swing. Nevertheless, have no issue with using you weight transfer to the trail glute as a trigger. If you want to start the swing by shifting into the trail glute to get a little momentum going I would go with that one. It seems to give you a little more flow in the swing according to the notes. Freeing items up and allowing for more efficiency.
January 16, 2015
64x64
Braden
Sorry I didn't see the other comments.
January 15, 2015
64x64
Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
No problem at all. I am here to help and trying to further clarify what is going on with reeds swing.
January 16, 2015
64x64
Braden
Chris, I wish I could see front on view because it looks like in down the line view he is keeping a lot of weight on his right side. If he transfer his weight onto the left side he should not be able to spin his left foot out the way he does. What do you see with his foot spinning out?
January 15, 2015
64x64
Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Braden -- His weight does move to the lead side pretty drastically in the downward move. He is leveraging the ground which is pushing the left foot so hard into the ground that it becomes almost weightless in the hitting area. The point of the video was to see how he uses the trail foot to stall the hips. Sorry I did not make that more clear. Look at how Bubba Watson hits his driver. He is up on his toes and almost airborne at times. Does this mean he has not shifted his weight to the lead side? Just trying to give a good comparison here for further clarification.
January 16, 2015
64x64
Ian
I have to agree with Dan and Pavel. He lifts his left foot completely off the ground through release. At 3:35 his right heel goes back down onto the ground and his left foot (3:37) comes right off the ground (and at the end of the full swing ends up well behind his original stance). Now I fully understand the importance of keeping your right foot from lifting too early as you, Chris, and Chuck (in his video) explain. No problem with that. But I'm surprised you make no comment on this strange business with the left foot. It looks like a recipe for disaster for someone like myself or anyone with less talent than Patrick Reed.
January 15, 2015
64x64
Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Ian -- His left foot actually stays down on the ground. His left foot slides back and externally rotates in the hitting area from all of the ground force he uses. You will see a lot of tour players come up onto their toes or even off the ground with all of the leverage they are trying to get from the ground. That is certainly not something we can teach to golfers. The point of the video, is to see how his hips are stalled at impact regardless of what his lead foot is doing. If you can stall the body properly in the hitting area then you can release the golf club with max speed at impact. Again, the point of the video was to watch how he used the right foot to stall the hips out regardless of what his left foot was doing.
January 15, 2015
64x64
Pavel
Have you look at the left feet movement? It looks like there is no weight.
January 15, 2015
64x64
Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
His weight does move to the lead side pretty drastically in the downward move. He is leveraging the ground which is pushing the left foot so hard into the ground that it becomes almost weightless in the hitting area. The point of the video was to see how he uses the trail foot to stall the hips. Sorry I did not make that more clear. Look at how Bubba Watson hits his driver. He is up on his toes and almost airborne at times. Does this mean he has not shifted his weight to the lead side? Just trying to give a good comparison here for further clarification.
January 16, 2015
64x64
bradford
no sound on this video. sound is good on all the others
January 15, 2015
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Bradford. Try clearing your cache or browser history. It is playing fine on my end. Are you using Chrome or Firefox as your browser? If you are and everything is status quo. Please use the Contact Us Link at the bottom of the page and Customer Support will help you fix the issue.
January 15, 2015
64x64
alex
same issue.....no audio...tried chrome,firefox and IE.......others video are fine......
January 15, 2015
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Alex. I will notify Customer Support. I apologize for your issue.
January 15, 2015
64x64
Todd
I also have no audio. I have also tried IE, firefox and Chrome. I get the RST intro theme at full volume but only barely perceptible audio during the video itself.
January 15, 2015
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Todd. Amy with Customer Service should be contacting you shortly.
January 15, 2015
64x64
grant
I saw a DVD by Manuel De La Torrey who says, "The body should get its timing going back and forward from the swinging of the arms.' The arms initiate the forward swing and almost simultaneously bring the body along with it to the finish.' With the arm swing giving you the timing & leading the way there is no need to concern yourself about how you get to your left foot finish. It just happens without all the concerns about how the move is made i.e. turn; slide and turn; how far do you slide before you turn etc.
January 14, 2015
64x64
Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Grant. I am unfamiliar with Manuael De LA Torrey's teaching, but you notes are suggesting the the arms move the body. You would be letting the outside control the inside versus opposite. You don't want momentum to be flinging the club and body around. You want to dictate the motion by controlling the swing with the bigger muscles and moving in towards the body. There is a 3 inch weight shift into the lead glute before any active turning should happen. Take a look at the Sitting Into the Left Side Video in the Downswing Section.
January 15, 2015
64x64
dan
im confused??? braking? he spins his hips so hard on this video that his left foot rotates to point toward the target? his right heel lifts early and lands again late for what looks like to regain balance. am i seeing something wrong?
January 14, 2015
64x64
Chris (Certified RST Instructor)
Hey Dan -- He unwinds the hips hard, and then stalls them at the release point of the swing. If he were to stand up on the right foot while he was released it would spin he body including the hips through the hitting area while he is releasing the club.
January 14, 2015

We're after one thing: Real Results - Real Fast. And that's exactly what our members achieve. And that's why they say the AXIOM is: Mind-blowing. Game changing. Revolutionary.

Check it out ...

Here at RotarySwing, talk is cheap and the proof is always in the pudding. Come see the massive transformations we can achieve together in your swing.

See for yourself ...

From beginner to pro, we have what you need to get you where you want to go.

See how inside ...

RotarySwing was founded out of frustration with the current state of golf instruction. Quinton knew a better way had to exist to learn this game we all love.

Learn more ...