Day 7: High and Low Draw

Rory Mcilroy's go to shot is the high draw with any club in the bag. I'm going to show you how to put it into your arsenal.

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Gary C
Is it true that to hit a draw you must setup with a slightly closed stance with your feet but club face square to your target versus the squared up stance that the RST fundamentals discuss as the basic stock straight shot setup?
May 11, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gary. You don't necessarily have to close the stance to hit a draw. If the chest is quieter coming down the club will square up sooner regardless of the stance.
May 11, 2021
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Gary C
By quieter do you mean more relaxed upper body and proper downswing sequence with arms and chest getting moved by the lower body in the downswing.
May 11, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gary. Yes. But, actually staying a few degrees closed at impact versus being square.
May 11, 2021
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Gary C
That clarifies things a bit. I was noticing that my club face was slightly closed at impact when I would pause at 9ish and then letting the club fall to impact. Seems that with my setup square, easy tempo and relaxed grip that the club comes down on plane and the face rotates a bit closed by 3:00 so I could only assume that what I was seeing when I pause was also happening at full speed. I thought that was incorrect... If plane is square and club face is still closed I will hit a draw and not pull it?
May 11, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gary. The pull would usually happen with the release and the shoulders open(pointed left) or coming in steeply.
May 11, 2021
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Gary C
So square shoulders and slightly closed club face is good. Is that better than square shoulders and a square club face? What should my ultimate goal be? Is it easier or more preferable to hit a draw versus dead straight?
May 11, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gary. Zeroed out on everything would be machine like. Coaches and engineers vary on this topic. Some like to have a few degree in to out and some with open face/closed etc because they feel a player needs to miss in some sort of direction. The goal is to zero out the plane and path as much as possible with square shoulders to eliminate variables.
May 11, 2021
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Gary C
I am feeling as though I am getting to a point where more and more the drills are feeling solid and the questions I have seem like they will be easier to answer on the range, observing ball flight. Is this something I will be better able to zero in on the range at this point? Once on the range should my goal be to try to hit shots that are a straight as possible or would it be beneficial to pick my desired stock shot and try to get consistent hitting that shot and then possibly proceed to experimenting trying to hit other shapes both to learn how to do that but also to increase confidence by understanding different shot shapes and being less afraid to hit a bad shot because I would know how each “miss” happens? I’ve always wanted to be able to hit a baby draw as my stock shot. Would that be an acceptable stock shot or is straight better?
May 11, 2021
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Gary. The typical stock rotary shot will be a slight draw, or draw bias. Once at the range you will be able to see more of what your swing is producing flight wise. The more the swing is dialed in the straighter the shot will be, but with lead release and good sequence a draw bias will be there.
May 12, 2021
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Veronica
I think Craig referred this video after my review but he did say a baby draw but the link he gave me points to a fade. Which is the correct one?
August 15, 2018
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Veronica
This was the end part of the link Craig referred to under the review 9-days-to-amazing-ball-striking/day-7-fine-tuning-your-fade. As you see it says fade there but think he wants me to look at the draw version.
August 15, 2018
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Ron A. Sr.
When you were setting up for the Draw Shot, did you remain Square to the target line?
April 6, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ron. When trying to hit a draw you shouldn't need much of a stance change.
April 6, 2018
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Ron A. Sr.
Well, what change should I make?
April 7, 2018
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Ron. The stance should stay the same. What you are trying to achieve with the draw is a slowing down of the chest/body. This will allow the arms/hands to work through sooner to start closing the face. If you start changing you stance alignment and playing off target you are introducing new variables that can change path/starting line location.
April 7, 2018
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Ron A. Sr.
Thanks, that what I wanted to know.
April 7, 2018
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timothy
Hi, Thanks for this great series of videos. I've been on rst now for a year, an hitting it way better, have seen my scores come down and this series really gives me the tools I need to progress further. So a big thank you. One thing I notice though is despite me hitting the ball much better with a better connection and flight. I don't take a diving hardly at all. Is this correct? Are there a series of videos I can watch about fivots and when to take on etc? They seem to always take one on tv from the fairway. Thanks
September 17, 2017
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Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
Hi Tim, I'm glad you enjoyed the ball striking video series. The divots should be very shallow. In fact, I've got a brand new series starting next week coming out that covers divots and the angle of attack specifically, so stay tuned!
September 18, 2017
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Terry
Chuck do you change your alignment for the high draw when moving the ball slightly forward as in the "bomb your driver" video? thanks Terry
September 10, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Terry. When trying to hit a high soft draw you shouldn't need much of a stance change.
September 11, 2017
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Wyatt
I struggle whenever I consciously rotate or turn my arms/hands over. I invariably come over the top and lose a lot of distance; I find if I ignore my hands and let the club naturally release I hit it quite a bit further. Are there any swing thoughts to deal with this?
September 3, 2017
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Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
Wyatt, please go back and watch the release videos, you never try and consciously rotate your hand over.
September 4, 2017
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Matt
I'm only in the early stages in my RST journey, but these videos have been great for me, thanks Chuck. They've answered so many questions I've had about these different types of shots, and really made me see the importance of the release. Game changer. Thanks!
September 3, 2017
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Chuck (Certified RST Instructor)
You're welcome!
September 4, 2017
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Marcel
Hello Craig, Do you hit the high draw the same with your driver?
September 3, 2017
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Craig (Certified RST Instructor)
Hello Marcel. Yes, any club in the bag.
September 3, 2017

All right, guys. It's graduation day. You've made it this far. You've learned a ton about how the pros learn how to manipulate ball flight while still giving themselves the biggest margin of error. It's not just a ton of talent and hand-eye coordination out there, building in things that are going to make it easier to repeat the shots consistently. In today's final video about this, we're going to talk about how to hit the high and low draw.

                                Yesterday, I talked about high and low fades and we talked about the wrist positions and ball positions and all those things. Today, the good thing about hitting a draw is it's very natural with RST. There's a couple things I want to point out that are going to make this shot more repeatable, more consistent for you.

                                Number one, the biggest thing that I think about, I don't really talk about what I think about or what I feel on my swing, I like to be very objective, but shaping shots is more of an art form than just science. It's a combination of the two, of course. The ball's not going to defy the laws of physics. But some things that you learn over years of practice and playing is certain things that feel consistent across the board for most golfers. The one thing that I've found when I'm going to hit a draw and I want to hit it high is that the more I slow down, the more consistent I can hit that shot. When I say slow down, I mean everything but particularly my chest rotation. If I'm really aggressive with my hips, it's going to pull my chest around, it's going to be very hard for me to get that club face to rotate and release. Because now, as we're trying hit not only a draw but we're trying to hit it up in the air, I need that club face to get back close to in line with my hands, depending on the trajectory that I want to hit. I can't my hands way leading, so if I'm real aggressive with my chest and shoulders, my hands are going to be really ahead of the ball and club facing going to intend to stay open. That's how you hit the cut.

                                Now, what I want to do when I hit this high draw, is I want to be syrupy smooth and nice and relaxed. Understand that the worst thing you can try and do with a draw, especially a high draw, is try and hit it hard. The ball's going to go further anyway, because you're delofting the club face and hitting a draw with hook spin on it, the ball's going to already going to go further. Don't try and make it go further. If anything, try and hit it less. You're going to hit it more consistent, more pure when you do that anyway. Try to take a little bit out of it and let the club face, the mechanics of how the ball is going to be compressed a little bit more, it's going to have a little more spin on it, hook spin on it, that's going to help it bite through the air, is going to get you the extra distance.

                                Slow it down a little bit. Get that feeling of being really nice and smooth and release, let that club face release. That's the critical thing. When we're doing this, we're trying to get the club face to release but also rotate. We've got to get that toe pointed over, even though we're rehinging. It's really important that you slow everything down to buy time for that to happen with the club. When I try to hit a high draw, I try to picture Ernie Els in my head. Just nice and buttery smooth to buy time for that to release.

                                The ball positive for the high draw, as you might have guessed, can be up in your stance just a little bit, because what's that going to do? It's going to allow the club a little bit more time to get the shaft more vertical and the club face more closed. Those are the two prerequisites for hitting a high draw, right? It's not rocket science. So if I move the ball up a half a ball width or maybe a full width, that's pushing it but, how about half a ball width, I'm just buying myself a couple extra degrees of rotation, which is all I need.

                                Now, when I go to hit the low draw, now's where things get a little bit tricky. That's why I started with the high draw first. That one's pretty simple. The low draw, the tendency is for people to put the ball way back in their stance. In this case, to some degree it's okay, believe it or not. There's a couple things I'm going to do and it depends on the severity of the low draw. Typically, a low draw tends to be more of an exaggeration shot because it's not very often that you're going to hit this as just a standard golf shot. Typically, when I think of hitting a low draw, I'm thinking about taking a longer iron, a three-iron or even a two-iron, moving it back in my stance and really hitting a low runner that's going to only fly half the normal distance but it's going to roll an extra 100 yards. It's typically where this shot is used in real life. Now, it doesn't mean you can't hit seven-irons that fly 125 yards in the air and fly really low, but not very often that you do that. This is more of a tee-off shot. Think of Tiger Woods' old stinger shot.

                                In that case, as we move the ball back in our stance, what's going to happen to our path? I want you to think about this. If the club is coming in still from the inside, like it normally should be, it's going to be working out to the right. So as it's working out to the right, the tendency is going to be for the ball to want to start right and you're going to have to hit a huge draw to get it to come back, and that's a lot of work. But we do need the ball to be back a little bit in order to deloft the club face enough to really get any value out of this shot.

                                Now, of course, there are varying degrees, here. If you're just trying to bring your trajectory down a little bit, then the low draw is a pretty simple, straightforward shot. You keep the ball in the same spot as normal and move it back maybe a full ball width and then just bow your wrist and really release it. That's where you're going to be looking like this in your follow through like we did in our first day drills. That's where this shot really comes in. But I'm really going to talk about this again as more of a tee shot kind of weapon that you can put in a windy condition to get the ball to roll a lot, so this one's a little bit different.

                                I'm moving the ball back moreso than I normally would, and here's where things are going to get a little bit interesting. I'm going to change the way that I take the club back. Now, again, if you're hitting a seven-iron normal shot, you don't have to change [inaudible 00:05:17]. You're taking a two-iron, three-iron, four-iron, even a three-wood and trying to do this shot, things need to change a little bit. So here's what happens. As I have the ball further back in my stance, I have less time and space for the club to square up.

                                What do you think I should do in order for to get all this stuff to work? Well, here's a secret. As I move the ball back in my stance, I'm going to take the club face back a little bit more closed. So as I get to the top of my swing, I'm going to have this wrist already pre-bowed slightly so that as I come down, even though the club is traveling more from the inside than normal, it's severely delofting. This coming from the inside makes it easier to draw the ball because the toe's going to want to naturally rotate over. Then, taking the club face back a little more shut allows me to really hood it coming down and get my wrist really bowed. Again, this is a severe specialty shot. You're trying to hook a five-iron under the woods, it's got to fly very far, fly very low, those types of things.

                                So that's where this shot really comes in handy. Move the ball back in your stance a little bit. You can play with this, that's what I want you to do, so you may go out and practice moving it back quite a bit. This is back of center. Take it back a little shut, and that ball was super low and a little bit left. It's going to draw quite a bit. As you start adding speed to this, you'll start finding the balance of how to put the ball in just the right spot, to how much to take it back closed, and how to find that perfect little sweet two-iron stinger out there.

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